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Guest PurpleNose

Is John Henry pretending not to sack Hodgson?

 

We'll get someone in to do the tactics next week.

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Totally underwhelmed by Commoli being appointed as Director of strategy.

There is nothing striking about his record at Spurs apart from some of the medicore signings. The players that have been a success were well known anyway by majority of teams.

 

There is nothing that suggests he will do exceptionally better than the previous managers appointed.

 

I guess the only benefit is that Roy isnt being trusted with the transfer funds in january on his own and his time at the club looks like it is going to be cut short.

 

The main part of success enjoyed by Arsenal is due to Arsene Wenger. Unless we can find a manager that is similar i dont think we are going to be successful going down this route.

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Totally underwhelmed by Commoli being appointed as Director of strategy.

There is nothing striking about his record at Spurs apart from some of the medicore signings. The players that have been a success were well known anyway by majority of teams.

 

There is nothing that suggests he will do exceptionally better than the previous managers appointed.

 

I guess the only benefit is that Roy isnt being trusted with the transfer funds in january on his own and his time at the club looks like it is going to be cut short.

 

The main part of success enjoyed by Arsenal is due to Arsene Wenger. Unless we can find a manager that is similar i dont think we are going to be successful going down this route.

 

Arsene Wenger is a superb manager and i would love someone with that kind of philosphy at Liverpool.

 

However good a manager he is though he is nothing without his scouting network and if this Comolli played a major part in that then so be it.

 

People should realise that Arsenal do pay a price for some of their youngsters but they tend not to splash out on the more expensive seasoned pro.

 

This appears to be the model we are striving towards and in all fairness im all for it.

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I see what your saying but it seems to work on the continent, Rafa wont be signing players at Inter for example, which is Ironic given the battles he had for control of transfers here, without getting into the whole shit again, I've no doubt he'd have refused this system if he was still here, when he arrived maybe but from 2007 onwards no chance.

 

One of the much loved repeated myths about Rafa is that he was a control freak (Even Graham Smith used that term yesterday) and that he wanted to control transfers.

 

Its not true.

 

At Valencia he did not control transfers nor does he at Inter Milan. In fact, in both those cases, there are strong executives. If he was a control freak he would not have taken either job. The same was true at LFC - where Parry controlled transfers to the extent he negotiated them. Parry would take the lead from the manager but he would also impose his own views.

 

Rafa said many times during his time at LFC that he did not care how many executives there were above him, he would work with anyone. But his beef was that time and again his transfer targets were missed - after Parry had agreed to them - because of the slow decision-making process or for penny-pinching reasons that did not make sense. The transfer budget was constantly offered and withdrawn making nonsense of his strategy.

 

When Parry went there was nobody in an executive role with any experience of the transfer market or of judging players. Instead we got a leverage buy out snake oil salesman in the form of Purslow. His ambition to be manager or football director, or whatever it was he thought he was doing, was to talk to Carragher and Gerrard and the media and eventually to Marcia.

 

In that situation Rafa could see, as could any intelligent person, that he must assert himself. He was, after all, the manager, and he would be held accountable for the management of the club.

 

He got the control in his contract, but Purslow, Broughton and the two cowboys ignored the contract and allowed Purslow to play his silly games.

 

At Inter Milan Rafa makes suggestions and submits his requests and they are taken seriously by experienced footballing people including the owner and President. But the final decision is made by the executives.

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I think its now essential we bring in a young upcoming manager that sees things in the same way Cammoli does, lets be honest he's been brought up on Wengers philosiphy of actually playing football to try and attack first and foremost so Roy is'nt gona fit in with that, TBH I think they have a target already and it may be a case of waiting till the end of season to get him. Another thing I know it might sound trivial, but Cammoli is 25 years younger than Hodgson, that relationship is not likely to be good.

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I think its now essential we bring in a young upcoming manager that sees things in the same way Cammoli does, lets be honest he's been brought up on Wengers philosiphy of actually playing football to try and attack first and foremost so Roy is'nt gona fit in with that, TBH I think they have a target already and it may be a case of waiting till the end of season to get him. Another thing I know it might sound trivial, but Cammoli is 25 years younger than Hodgson, that relationship is not likely to be good.

 

How about Deschamps.

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Perfect, but as I said it would be end of season at best, even then we'd do well to get him, he's a God over there.

 

Sure i read somewhere in the summer about him having a fall out with his club so you never know.

 

It also depends on the project he is offered at Liverpool.

 

Lets be honest we are still a massive club and that will appeal to many managers and if NESV are going to be true to their word and back the manager financially then again this makes us a tempting proposition.

 

He is a god over there but just look at how the managers are idolised at Liverpool especially when they bring success.

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Dutch Football - Capello’s just a start – England must go Dutch to become world beaters

 

 

Capello’s just a start – England must go Dutch to become world beaters

John Dickens

Sports news and Sports Headlines | Sports Site | Latest Sports Views from Real Fans - Sportingo

Saturday' date=' May 4 2008

It's all right having an Italian coach but the FA must look further abroad and start developing young players along the lines of France and the Netherlands.

 

The debate over whether the FA were right to look abroad and appoint another foreign coach is still fresh on the lips of many England fans – but the answer to England’s problems could lie in applying foreign influences at a different level.

Fabio Capello cannot guarantee England future success – but implementing the foreign approach into the English youth development set-up can.

 

Last year UNICEF produced a league table of child well-being in rich countries. Focusing on 21 industrialised countries, UNICEF looked at 40 indicators including poverty, family relationships and health. The UK was bottom. Sitting at the top of the league was the Netherlands.

[b']“In terms of what Holland does better than us in developing their youngsters, it’s not just about football,” said Paul Cooper, of the English based DutchUK football school.[/b] “England’s problem lies deeper than just football – it’s our society and culture.”

 

Cooper set up the DutchUK football school alongside colleague Bert-Jan Heijmans. Every year the pair take around 30-40 English football coaches to witness the different culture and structure of youth development in the Netherlands.

Cooper added: “The child is always the centre of their football – not the coaching. Their whole attitude is based on a child and community-based culture.

 

“From travelling to Holland with the football school, I visited a club and saw a boy playing in the under-6 team. His dad played for the second team and his granddad was in the 10th team. They have true community clubs.”

In terms of coaching, England has also fallen behind the rest of Europe. The Premier League only signed up to UEFA's coaching rules in 2003, resulting in all the major European footballing nations having more coaches with the ‘A’ Licence and Pro Licence than in England.

 

Sir Trevor Brooking, the Football Association’s Director of Football Development, emphasises the need for much better quality coaches working in the younger age groups. He said: “At the moment anyone who’s any good quickly goes through the system and is coaching 16-plus because that’s the only place he’s going to get any money, whereas in other countries they pay quality people to stay in the five to 11s and to stay in the 11 to 16s.”

 

Brooking also views the proposed national football centre in Burton as a key change in how England produces its footballers.

The NFC was intended to be a training camp for all England teams as well as act as a focal point for the FA’s coaching and development work – similar to French football’s Clairefontaine centre.

 

Helene Schrub, head of communications of the FC Metz academy, said: “Would the English national team benefit from a structure like Clairefontaine? I am not too sure. The national school is important in France because one fifth of our population is concentrated in the Paris region – where there is only the single professional club, Paris Saint Germain.

“A Clairefontaine in England would perhaps be less effective because the English population is not particularly concentrated in a single region. The training centres of the professional clubs should answer for the needs of the population.”

Metz, along with many of the French football academies, has an impressive list of recent graduates, most notably Emmanuel Adebayor, Robert Pires and Louis Saha.

 

The European Champions League provides strong evidence of France’s dominating influence in producing quality players. There are more French players in the Champions League than any other European country – only Brazil produces more footballers.

As Aime Jacquet testifies, the continued success of France in churning out young stars is the result of a long, painstaking, carefully planned process to organise and teach football in an entirely new way.

Jacquet managed the France's World Cup winners of 1998 before moving into directing the national coaching and development programme. The on-off Burton National Football Centre is only a small step towards following the French example.

Tottenham’s sporting director, Damien Comolli, has told BBC Sport: “For me, the difference is the quantity of training in England and France. Over four years, between the ages of 12 and 16, a French boy would receive 2,304 hours of training. That is twice as much as in England – where you would be given 1,152 hours.

“Those four years are crucial – it is difficult to catch up when you are 17 or 18.”

 

Watford are the first English club to re-work their academy – geared towards the European way. The school, based on a Dutch system, provides youngsters with football training fitted around their education, which results in the boys participating in three times the amount of coaching of 12 to 16-year-olds that is standard in most of the English academies.

Paul Cooper believes that although the English culture and mentality to “win at all costs” is proving detrimental to developing our youngsters, but with a little foreign influence, it could give England the edge on other countries.

“When I go to Holland, they say, ‘teach us about your country’s passion and about your commitment’. They don’t naturally have it in their make-up whereas England does.

 

“Holland makes this up with their education and development. If we could just say to ourselves, we’ve got this passion for the game and will to win - we would always start one up on virtually any other nation.

“The trouble is that’s all we ever concentrate on.

 

 

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I'm not saying it's definitely this guy, but his background in youth coaching would point to it being him. I also note that Comoli is quoted in this piece as well, so there appears to be a connection.

 

I wonder if "going dutch" means the owners have identified a dutchman as Roy's possible replacement? most successful dutch clubs have DOF's at the clubs (i mean successful compaired to the stature of their league/financess ect.)dont forget aswell some really good players from south america started of in the dutch leagues so lets hope our new DOF has contacts globaly rather than just in one country which seems to be the trend when new managers come to clubs.

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Interesting move. Will have to sit back and watch this unfold as I don't know what to think about it.

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Arsene Wenger is a superb manager and i would love someone with that kind of philosphy at Liverpool.

 

However good a manager he is though he is nothing without his scouting network and if this Comolli played a major part in that then so be it.

 

People should realise that Arsenal do pay a price for some of their youngsters but they tend not to splash out on the more expensive seasoned pro.

 

This appears to be the model we are striving towards and in all fairness im all for it.

 

Yes so would I. But he was a scout at Arsenal nothing more. His link to Arsenals success is exaggerated more than a bit.

 

although scouts are important in that model..the main man is Wenger himself.

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One factor to consider for the player (besides a lucrative contract) is how easy it would be for them to settle. It's understandable that players from abroad may find London more to their liking because they won't really be too far from their home comforts. You can go overboard and not integrate a la Reyes, who lived with his family and hung around with London's Andalucian communities, thus never adapted to British life.

 

Spurs' advantage over Liverpool when signing some of these players was that there was a greater chance of first team football at Spurs, less pressure, as well as the London factor for settling in. Although Liverpool does have some cosmopolitan-ness, it's still very much a Scouse identity so some players might struggle to adapt. Struggling to settle and not being able to deal with the heightened expectations at Anfield could break a player.

 

Also in London there's a LOT more to fill your spare time with.

 

The other thing to consider is that Spurs had much better negotiators than Liverpool during Comolli's time. Our lot sold the family silver once, after not doing their homework.

 

Top post.

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I'm not sure whether I'm convinced about a DOF as I can see valid arguments on both sides. But I am impressed by the fact the new owners clearly have a strategy and a plan in place and that it is already beginning to take shape.

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I wonder if "going dutch" means the owners have identified a dutchman as Roy's possible replacement? most successful dutch clubs have DOF's at the clubs (i mean successful compaired to the stature of their league/financess ect.)dont forget aswell some really good players from south america started of in the dutch leagues so lets hope our new DOF has contacts globaly rather than just in one country which seems to be the trend when new managers come to clubs.

 

Im sure...thats we replciated the dutch way in terms of academy. But changed it in the Rafa years to concentrate more on the football (which it should be from my point of view)

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Do you know what, i think we could have a foriegn manager lined up here. Someone like Rijkaard/Pellegrini who have worked under DOF's before and just manage the the players they have been given.

 

or how about a cockney approaching retirement age who has worked abroad, is comfortable with the DoF system, is current manager of the year and got to last seasons uefa cup final ... oh hang on .... :whistle:

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Perfect, but as I said it would be end of season at best, even then we'd do well to get him, he's a God over there.

 

Quique Flores would be on the radar as well along with Di Matteo both of those would jump ship no problems.

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Totally underwhelmed by Commoli being appointed as Director of strategy.

There is nothing striking about his record at Spurs apart from some of the medicore signings. The players that have been a success were well known anyway by majority of teams.

 

There is nothing that suggests he will do exceptionally better than the previous managers appointed.

 

I guess the only benefit is that Roy isnt being trusted with the transfer funds in january on his own and his time at the club looks like it is going to be cut short.

 

The main part of success enjoyed by Arsenal is due to Arsene Wenger. Unless we can find a manager that is similar i dont think we are going to be successful going down this route.

 

Yes but they didn't sign them. He contributed or was instrumental for them signing for spurs. You know what if we had his success rate here for the last 6 years then I wonder how differently things would be now? I am envious with some of their players. Ones that others deemed too much of a risk or not value for money.

 

How much money have Spurs lost during his tenure? Would be interesting to see there perceived failure rate compared to ours. I wonder who's is worse?

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The players that have been a success were well known anyway by majority of teams.

 

Still one of the most ridiculous arguments in football*.

 

*no doubt used it myself at some point though.

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Still one of the most ridiculous arguments in football.

 

Yep.

 

Everyone had heard of Torres so why didn't they take the chance on him then.

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