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14 minutes ago, TheHowieLama said:

Wait - Stronts lives in St Helens?

Wallasey. Granted its only slightly better than St Helens but its a bit like saying "Hey fuck you man I shag cats not dogs, I have standards" 

 

SD can spell as well so it's defo not him. 

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The chances of dying from COVID-19 have fallen precipitously since the pandemic began, according to two new peer-reviewed studies.

One study, from researchers at New York University's Grossman School of Medicine, found that the death rate has gone down substantially among all age groups.

Patients treated by NYU's health system had a 25.6% chance of dying when the pandemic began but that number has fallen to 7.6% in recent weeks, according to the study, which will be published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine next week.

The researchers identified multiple reasons for the drop, including increased experience with the virus among health workers, lower hospital capacity, the availability of new treatments, earlier intervention, higher community awareness, and "lower viral load exposure from increasing mask wearing and social distancing." The researchers added that it is also possible that "earlier periods had a more virulent circulating strain."

"Our findings suggest that while COVID-19 remains a terrible disease, our efforts to improve treatment are probably working," co-author Leora Horwitz said in a statement. "Even in the absence of a silver-bullet treatment or vaccine, we are protecting more of our patients through a host of small changes."

While the NYU study only looked at about 5,000 cases in a single health system in New York, another analysis by Bilal Mateen, a researcher at the Alan Turing Institute in the United Kingdom similarly found that the death rate has fallen about 20 percentage points since the pandemic began.

Khalilah Gates, a critical care pulmonologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, told NPR that patients in the early days of the pandemic were put on ventilators and breathing machines and perhaps offered enrollment into critical trials but "six-plus months into this, we kind of have a rhythm, and so it has become an everyday standard patient for us at this point in time."

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‘White House chief of staff Mark Meadows has just made one of the most revealing comments to emerge from Trump’s inner circle about the president’s historic mishandling of the coronavirus crisis. On a Sunday political talk show, Meadows admitted that the federal government was not focusing on trying to control the pandemic.

 

“We’re not going to control the pandemic,” he told Jake Tapper on CNN’s State of the Union. “We are going to control the fact that we get a vaccine, therapeutics and other mitigation.”’

 

Looks like Yankeedoodleland has given up.

 

Bold.

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There was a bit of optimism from Anthony Fauci this morning on Marr about the beginning of a vaccine rollout for healthcare workers before Christmas (at least in the US).

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Just now, Jenson said:

There was a bit of optimism from Anthony Fauci this morning on Marr about the beginning of a vaccine rollout for healthcare workers before Christmas (at least in the US).

Supposed to be the same here for NHS staff.

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28 minutes ago, Section_31 said:

Supposed to be the same here for NHS staff.

Then all we need to do is skill up the nation's bar staff to give the vaccine and invite us all back to the pub for a pint and a jab. 

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40 minutes ago, Jenson said:

There was a bit of optimism from Anthony Fauci this morning on Marr about the beginning of a vaccine rollout for healthcare workers before Christmas (at least in the US).

I seen that and got the feeling he wasn't exactly exactly being honest. Don't know why but something just didn't feel right about him.

 

Time will tell I suppose.

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6 minutes ago, Dougie Do'ins said:

I seen that and got the feeling he wasn't exactly exactly being honest. Don't know why but something just didn't feel right about him.

 

Time will tell I suppose.

I think he was in a tough position. Not sure why he took the interview. He was relentlessly asked is trump a cunt and he did his best to say yes without saying yes. Equally where a vaccine is concerned he doesn't want to say anything that might help trump get re-elected. 

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2 minutes ago, Barrington Womble said:

I think he was in a tough position. Not sure why he took the interview. He was relentlessly asked is trump a cunt and he did his best to say yes without saying yes. Equally where a vaccine is concerned he doesn't want to say anything that might help trump get re-elected. 

Yep. Best thing to have done would have been to just not do it.

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22 minutes ago, Dougie Do'ins said:

I seen that and got the feeling he wasn't exactly exactly being honest. Don't know why but something just didn't feel right about him.

 

Time will tell I suppose.

Thats how I feel about Andy Burnham. He feels like an opportunist, something about him feels insincere.

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52 minutes ago, Strontium Dog™ said:

 

It varies from year to year. Last year it was a shade under 7%.

You are going to have to show your work here pal - about 35 million people just in the US a year get the flu.

 

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33 minutes ago, TheHowieLama said:

You are going to have to show your work here pal - about 35 million people just in the US a year get the flu.

 

Right, but we're talking about those who are hospitalised here.

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45 minutes ago, Strontium Dog™ said:

 

Right, but we're talking about those who are hospitalised here.

Good point man - wonder how that stacks up since the majority of Covid deaths have been out of hospital.

 

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9 hours ago, littletedwest said:

A girl i know shared this on Facebook " what is happening in are country "she lives in st helens

The biggest complainers about this on the Twitter that I can see are... the English.

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I think the only concern from those papers about the reduced mortality is that is also correlated with a significant reduction in the numbers of patients coming through the hospitals and the average age being lower. There are some indications within the UK that areas which are seeing large surges of new patients are not achieving the same levels of reduced mortality due to work load pressure on staff and organisational through put of the pathways set-up. However I wait to see if this is confirmed in the ICNARC data.

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(Reuters) - Early results from tests for a coronavirus vaccine being developed by the University of Oxford, in collaboration with AstraZeneca Plc AZN.L, show it produces a robust immune response in elderly people, the group at highest risk, the Financial Times reported on Monday.

 

It has been discovered that the vaccine triggers protective antibodies and T-cells in older age groups, the newspaper said on.ft.com/3kxKyJI, citing two people familiar with the finding, encouraging researchers as they seek evidence that it will spare those in later life from serious illness or death from the virus.

 

The findings echo data released in July which showed the vaccine generated “robust immune responses” in a group of healthy adults aged between 18 and 55, the newspaper reported, citing people aware of the results from so-called immunogenicity blood tests.

 

But the FT cautioned that positive immunogenicity tests do not guarantee that the vaccine will ultimately prove safe and effective in older people.

 

AstraZeneca, which is developing the vaccine with Oxford University researchers, is seen as a frontrunner in the race to produce a vaccine to protect against COVID-19.

 

Details of the finding are expected to be published shortly in a clinical journal, the FT said, without naming a journal.

 

Oxford and AstraZeneca did not immediately respond to Reuters’ request for comments.

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4 hours ago, niallers said:

Spain going to impose a curfew from 11pm to 6 am for the entire country FOR 6 MONTHS! That's an eye opener and no mistake

My Mrs has been trying to introduce that for 15 years

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20 minutes ago, Section_31 said:

(Reuters) - Early results from tests for a coronavirus vaccine being developed by the University of Oxford, in collaboration with AstraZeneca Plc AZN.L, show it produces a robust immune response in elderly people, the group at highest risk, the Financial Times reported on Monday.

 

It has been discovered that the vaccine triggers protective antibodies and T-cells in older age groups, the newspaper said on.ft.com/3kxKyJI, citing two people familiar with the finding, encouraging researchers as they seek evidence that it will spare those in later life from serious illness or death from the virus.

 

The findings echo data released in July which showed the vaccine generated “robust immune responses” in a group of healthy adults aged between 18 and 55, the newspaper reported, citing people aware of the results from so-called immunogenicity blood tests.

 

But the FT cautioned that positive immunogenicity tests do not guarantee that the vaccine will ultimately prove safe and effective in older people.

 

AstraZeneca, which is developing the vaccine with Oxford University researchers, is seen as a frontrunner in the race to produce a vaccine to protect against COVID-19.

 

Details of the finding are expected to be published shortly in a clinical journal, the FT said, without naming a journal.

 

Oxford and AstraZeneca did not immediately respond to Reuters’ request for comments.

Sounds like good positive news. 

 

Hopefully it remains positive and we can start jabbing people and get back to normal. 

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3 minutes ago, chrisbonnie said:

Sounds like good positive news. 

 

Hopefully it remains positive and we can start jabbing people and get back to normal. 

Sounds harsh to legalise punching people but I'm in. 

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Just now, chrisbonnie said:

Sounds like good positive news. 

 

Hopefully it remains positive and we can start jabbing people and get back to normal. 

The vibe around the vaccine has changed massively as the year has progressed, even those experts who've understandably urged caution seem to be optimistic that something is on the cards.

 

It will probably take a while to get everyone covered, especially due to the private sector clusterfuck that will undoubtedly unfold when they're brought in to distribute and administer it, but it is still positive news. 

 

When the warmer weather comes in spring, and with a vaccine gradually being rolled out around that time, fingers crossed the end will be nigh, in a good way.

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