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The Coalition

Will the coalition last the full 5 years?  

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  1. 1. Will the coalition last the full 5 years?



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When the Lib Dems entered the coalition I would say the most prominent members were Nick Clegg obviously, Vince Cable, David Laws, Chris Huhne and Danny Alexander. ( I know there are others like Burstow and Browne but I never see them mentioned as much ).

 

Now, a year later, Laws has resigned over his expenses, Cable has been caught out with the Murdoch comments, Huhne may fall on his sword ( no idea if the allegations against him have any truth to them, just going off what the press says ) and Clegg is at rock bottom. If it carries on this way they will be decimated at the next election.

 

The tories have played a blinder with them taking a lot of the blame for the cuts, and whenever one of them, like Huhne, speaks out against them the right wing press are all over them. Surely this can't go on much longer.

 

So, will the coalition last the full 5 years?

 

Poll to follow

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To be fair to Huhne who hasn't passed points on?

 

I know he is in a position of responsibility and if he does get caught out he'll have to go for lying, not trying to get the wife to take his points .

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I voted no but i reckon it will probably last 5 years. The libdems have nowhere to go. They're getting all the perks of being in government at the moment and know they're going to get destroyed in the next election so why change anything?

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I voted no, but I reckon that was mostly just wishful thinking.

 

Either way, the Lib Dems - the lying bunch of shithouse coward fucks - are completely finished as a serious political party.

 

If they're getting fucked by the Tories, well then that just serves them right and I think it's fucking hilarious, frankly.

 

If you get in to bed with a total arsehole then don't be surprised when he fucks you like you owe him money and then pisses on you and kicks you to the kerb. It's not like you didn't know who he was, you fucking whores.

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Lend me your crystal ball, I want to find out next week's lottery results.

 

You don't need a crystal ball to see what's going on right this very minute - ie: There's barely anybody who would now consider the Lib Dems as a serious alternative for their vote.

 

If they don't get a pasting at the next general election then I'd be less surprised if I woke up tomorrow morning with seven dicks.

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There's barely anybody who would now consider the Lib Dems as a serious alternative for their vote.

 

 

And you're making this claim barely a fortnight after 15% of the country voted for us in an election.

 

People are jumping the gun if they think they can predict the results of the 2015 general election with any accuracy.

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The coalition will last until the tories think they can get a majority outright.

 

Majority outright?

 

Ever see David Cameron campaign, up close? He'll go into those high school gymnasiums in Edinburgh and Manchester and blow no-one away. He'll shake every wealthy hand in the joint, ignore every baby, condemn every widow on benefits and sound dumber and less honest than any Conservative they've ever seen. Because he is.

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And you're making this claim barely a fortnight after 15% of the country voted for us in an election.

 

People are jumping the gun if they think they can predict the results of the 2015 general election with any accuracy.

 

you might be right, and I'd kind of like to hope you are, as we need credible alternatives.

And I guess you're right in that you never know what the next few years holds in store in terms of the topics of the day etc.

 

But going as a snap shot of today, there isn't a day passes when the Lib Dems aren't losing more of that dwindling credibility, and that doesn't bode well. Not well at all.

 

I admire your optimism for your party old bean, but I fear it is just that; optimism. The reality is that things looks pretty bleak, you have to admit...

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The bit in bold below from Kevin Maguires column in todays Mirror would be fantastic if it got released.

 

Kevin Maguire - News Columnists - Mirror.co.uk

 

CAMERON could prove he believes Chris Huhne by presenting him a peaked cap and appointing the Cabinet Minister his chauffeur.

 

The Lib Dem is in a political car crash, scrapped ex-wife Vicky Pryce enjoying bitter revenge after he dumped her for a younger model.

 

It’d be the end of the road for a Con if cops probed a Tory Minister whose wife claimed he unlawfully dodged points to avoid a driving ban.

 

A No 10 snout muttered hearing Huhne’s wriggling reminded him of Arthur Daley’s slippery spiel.

 

The PM, I was told, is relaxed because he’s got all five Cabinet Lib Dems exactly where he wants them.

 

Huhne’s no longer a threat, a mumbling fugitive shorn of the authority to confront Tories. Vince Cable was defused by mouthing off in a honeytrap.

 

Nick Clegg’s gone from nodding dog to hangdog since that referendum crushing.

 

Danny Alexander fears total humiliation if a TV tape of him farting loudly is broadcast.

 

And Michael Moore lost his sporran in the great Scottish slaughter of May 5.

 

Liberal Democrats are wrecked while propping up the *Conservatives.

 

Cameron speeds right-wards, car sick Lib Dem passengers powerless to stop him.

 

No wonder the PM savours his allies’ discomfort.

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AV referendum: Not much tension but plenty of hot air | Politics | The Guardian

 

In the Platinum Suite of the cavernous ExCeL Centre in London's East End, David Dimbleby's election panel discussion was the high point of a sleepy afternoon. Outside in the sunshine, young men in shorts nursed pints of chilled lager in tall glasses. Inside the centre, young men in dark suits nursed chilled ambitions to be the best spin doctor in the press room when the results of the referendum on the alternative vote finally started coming in.

 

It was a long wait during which tension stubbornly refused to mount.

 

At 4pm Jenny Watson, chair of the Electoral Commission – the referendum's equivalent of the US Navy Seals – announced that counting had just started in the 440 local counting offices throughout the country. Hurrah! It would all be over by 8pm, pundits told each other. Or possibly by 10pm.

 

On the telly, Caroline Lucas, the Green leader and sole Green MP, was celebrating the news that Brighton and Hove council would now be Green-led, another first for the party. Home Counties Tories shuddered. They'd always suspected that the Germans planned to establish a bridgehead somewhere on the Sussex coast – and here they were, disguised as Greens.

 

For a proponent of the new politics Lucas was sounding disconcertingly like an old-politics talker, scoring points off the Lib Dems for not insisting on real electoral reform instead of that AV rubbish. No, she wouldn't reveal Green plans for Brighton either.

 

"Come on," said Dimbleby Senior, bursting playfully into life. "We're talking privately on the BBC news channel, it's not as if we're broadcasting to Brighton or the world." Cheeky. That'll teach the BBC suits to break with protocol and let a commoner like Huw Edwards do last week's royal wedding.

 

In the Platinum Suite press room younger reporters hunted for wet paint which they could watch drying. A trickle of politicians started arriving to do their soundbites for the cameras, Labour's John Reid for the no voters, the Lib Dem Treasury minister, Danny Alexander, for the yes camp. On telly, the SNP leader, Alex Salmond, could be seen grinning as if he'd broken into the Bank of England vaults (which, in a way, he has).

 

Then, at 4.52pm, a result! Admittedly it was from the Scilly Isles, where 288 people had voted yes and 542 had voted no, 65% to 35%. It was followed from the other watery end of the kingdom by Orkney. In Britain's only other nationwide referendum, on Europe in 1975, Orkney was almost alone in rejecting the EU. This time oil-rich Orcadians conformed: 3,817 yes votes to 4,829 no votes, 60.24% to 39.76%.

 

And that was it really. The rolling tally on the Electoral Commission's screen at the ExCeL started moving more quickly, though not as fast as the TV networks. The first million no votes (to 421,857 saying yes) were reached shortly before 6pm, but there was no sign of a late upset – apart from progressive ghettoes such as Islington, Camden and Cambridge. The spin doctors were left with little or nothing to do but plot. When Jenny Watson officially announced the first regional result from the north-east – 212,951 votes to 546,138 – they managed a feeble partisan cheer.

 

Time for an early bath? Of course not. In huddled corners and on ITN, Sky and the Beeb, Lord Reid warned anyone who'd listen that the yes camp must not try to sneak electoral reform into Westminster via the back door, such as an amendment in the Lords. Thrusting apparatchik Tory MP Matt Hancock insisted that the result "puts off electoral reform for a generation".

 

Not at all, countered Lord Rennard, the Lib Dems' election strategist. Labour had introduced PR voting for Wales and Scotland. The Tories had conceded the principle for a reformed House of Lords. It will be back, he predicted.

 

Yet it was his coalition colleague, Danny Alexander, who may well have spoken most eloquently for the mood of Britain. Waiting to be interviewed at Sky's Millbank studios just after dawn he eased off the most enormous fart heard in those parts since the Blitz – unaware that he was being recorded on 100 monitor screens by startled Sky staff. It may prove to be the election's Facebook moment

 

I trust Sky will wait for the appropriate moment to ' find ' and release the footage.

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Guest Numero Veinticinco

It almost certainly won't last right the way through 'til the next election, the Lib Dems have pretty much said that (Vince Cable, on Question Time), but it remains to be seen how early it breaks.

 

I wasn't certain it would last this long, I'm even less certain that it'll last more than 3 years. I guess a lot depends on what's going on behind the scenes. As I said in the other thread, I think it'll be the Conservatives who break it off, rather than the LDs who look to miss out.

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Guest Numero Veinticinco
if it breaks up, will there have to be another general election immediately?

 

Not immediately, but pretty soon. The Conservatives will still have a minority government, but will probably call an election pretty quickly as they'll expect a vote of no confidence pretty quickly after the coalition splits.

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And you're making this claim barely a fortnight after 15% of the country voted for us in an election.

 

People are jumping the gun if they think they can predict the results of the 2015 general election with any accuracy.

 

15% of the country?! Have you been sniffing glue? Thats roughly 9 million people!

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15% of the country?! Have you been sniffing glue? Thats roughly 9 million people!

 

Thats a lot of straws he's clutching, nar I think he means 15% of the overall voters, not sure how many that was, probably not a lot.

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Thats a lot of straws he's clutching, nar I think he means 15% of the overall voters, not sure how many that was, probably not a lot.

 

I think hes fully aware of the facts and figures and is attempting to mislead people.

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I think hes fully aware of the facts and figures and is attempting to mislead people.

 

Like any politician, he's interested in self perpetuation and self survival, NOT the truth of reality. The truth of reality will not sustain you in a false system, to be correct in the false system is to bark up the tree of delusion while idiots applaud.

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Like any politician, he's interested in self perpetuation and self survival, NOT the truth of reality. The truth of reality will not sustain you in a false system, to be correct in the false system is to bark up the tree of delusion while idiots applaud.

 

Dennis, you ever consider writing the messages inside fortune cookies for a living?

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I'd like to think not but I reckon it deffo will. Politicians will do anything to retain power - including staying in bed with people they're fundamentally opposed to.

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