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The Truth is Out There - The Dim in Beirut

 

City Fans: Here's Evidence Of The United Referee Conspiracy - Sabotage Times

 

 

These articles about referees and man yoo. I've just been talking about it with a manc at work (who's otherwise a nice guy). He raised the question about how the figures in the article stack up against averages and he's probably got a point. There's not a lot in these articles about average games reffed per team per ref per year, the bloke who wrote them tends to use extremes like Clattenburg v Webb.

 

I'm convinced Ferguson has undue influence on the game and match officials

For instance, last night he was fuming at the officials at full time about Carroll's human missile launch on Evra and DeGea (good work Andy). Lo and behold in the second half they're handed a second half equaliser from a blatantly offside Van Persie strike.

 

However, I'm wondering if anyone has any averages on referees, how often they ref other teams and how ref selection works. Is there an elite group of "top" referees who are picked for bigger games for example?

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The Truth is Out There - The Dim in Beirut

 

City Fans: Here's Evidence Of The United Referee Conspiracy - Sabotage Times

 

I'm convinced Ferguson has undue influence on the game and match officials

For instance, last night he was fuming at the officials at full time about Carroll's human missile launch on Evra and DeGea (good work Andy). Lo and behold in the second half they're handed a second half equaliser from a blatantly offside Van Persie strike.

 

It wasn't the offside goal, it was the way Carroll got booked for fuck all at the start of the second half. To be fair, he should have been booked for the way he jumped into De Gea, I do understand why Ginbeak was raging to be fair, but that's not the point. The point is, lo and behold, he then gets a soft booking for fuck all.

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Hmmm.

 

There seems to a common opinion that the bacon faced cunt can influence a result. How fucking dare people write that. Every one knows its just coincidence.

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What really rags on me is the way refs in their games will try and duke the stats. For 80 mins the other team will get nothing their way.

 

Then when United are 2-0 up and coasting the ref will start booking United players, giving away ridiculous freekicks against them and generally doing his utmost to make sure when the stats are tallied at the end of the game he looks like he did a fair job.

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One thing which riles me. I mean really fucking riles me. Is the way everyone tip-toes around him. Watching SSN this morning nearly made me sick.

 

Fit Slag with ace tits presenting the broadcast :

 

"Sir Alex was not happy with the refereeing decisions during the game"

 

Sir Alex? Fuck off tidy slut. This isn't MUFC. His name is fucking Ferguson.

 

_______________________________________________

 

Pussy prick interviewer straight after the match : (First question this - nothing about the score!)

 

Well, Sir Alex - shall we start with a certain incident at the end of the first half?

 

What the actual fuck?! Are you fucking joking you soft cunt? Ask the alcoholic wanker if he feels a 2-2 draw is a fair reflection, like you would every other fucking manager.

 

 

AAAAAAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

 

 

 

 

 

Rant over

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One thing which riles me. I mean really fucking riles me. Is the way everyone tip-toes around him. Watching SSN this morning nearly made me sick.

 

Watched that interview yesterday and thought the same, thought I couldn't be arsed posting about it.

 

You could fucking hear the trepidation in the interviewer's voice when he attempted to bring up the offside goal. "What do you think about your second goal? It seems like Van Persie was slightly offside..." - met with silence from SAF (as he's probably just realised hes made a cunt out of himself for calling the refereeing shit) - "...anyway! Another great result and a step closer to being champions again!".

 

Why don't you all just suck him off.

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One thing which riles me. I mean really fucking riles me. Is the way everyone tip-toes around him. Watching SSN this morning nearly made me sick.

 

Fit Slag with ace tits presenting the broadcast :

 

 

 

Sir Alex? Fuck off tidy slut. This isn't MUFC. His name is fucking Ferguson.

 

_______________________________________________

 

Pussy prick interviewer straight after the match : (First question this - nothing about the score!)

 

 

 

What the actual fuck?! Are you fucking joking you soft cunt? Ask the alcoholic wanker if he feels a 2-2 draw is a fair reflection, like you would every other fucking manager.

 

 

AAAAAAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

 

 

 

 

 

Rant over

 

I was listening to FiveLive a few months back, right at the end of the Jan transfer window, and Mark Chapman - who's usually excellent, I think - was personally interviewing managers following their midweek game that evening.

 

Each time, after asking each manager about their game that evening, he'd finish the interview with something like:

 

"So then Chris/Brian/Alan/Andre, any last-minute dealings in the transfer window?"

 

To which they'd squirm, give a non-commital response and then sign-off the interview. But the tone in which he asked the question was firm and decisive. He was asking the question whether they liked it or not.

 

And then came to Ferguson's interview, and the way he asked the question just spoke volumes:

 

"And sorry Sir Alex, I have to ask this, but any signings before the deadline closes?"

 

It was apologetic, deferential, and in that small snapshot you got an insight into just how terrified all these broadcasters/journalists are of him.

 

It's actually pretty pathetic.

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I was listening to FiveLive a few months back, right at the end of the Jan transfer window, and Mark Chapman - who's usually excellent, I think - was personally interviewing managers following their midweek game that evening.

 

Each time, after asking each manager about their game that evening, he'd finish the interview with something like:

 

"So then Chris/Brian/Alan/Andre, any last-minute dealings in the transfer window?"

 

To which they'd squirm, give a non-commital response and then sign-off the interview. But the tone in which he asked the question was firm and decisive. He was asking the question whether they liked it or not.

 

And then came to Ferguson's interview, and the way he asked the question just spoke volumes:

 

"And sorry Sir Alex, I have to ask this, but any signings before the deadline closes?"

 

It was apologetic, deferential, and in that small snapshot you got an insight into just how terrified all these broadcasters/journalists are of him.

 

It's actually pretty pathetic.

 

I'm not sure if the Journo's will ever change because mass media itself has changed so much in so many negative ways they're beyond help.

 

But Football itself in England will benefit a bit from when he finally fucks off. I don't expect a new era of sunshine and lollipops but there will be a few less useless pricks shitting themselves everytime he barks.

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They havent had a penalty or a red card given against them this season apparently.

 

Coincidence again.

 

They have been trained to not foul opponents.

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I was listening to FiveLive a few months back, right at the end of the Jan transfer window, and Mark Chapman - who's usually excellent, I think - was personally interviewing managers following their midweek game that evening.

 

Each time, after asking each manager about their game that evening, he'd finish the interview with something like:

 

"So then Chris/Brian/Alan/Andre, any last-minute dealings in the transfer window?"

 

To which they'd squirm, give a non-commital response and then sign-off the interview. But the tone in which he asked the question was firm and decisive. He was asking the question whether they liked it or not.

 

And then came to Ferguson's interview, and the way he asked the question just spoke volumes:

 

"And sorry Sir Alex, I have to ask this, but any signings before the deadline closes?"

 

It was apologetic, deferential, and in that small snapshot you got an insight into just how terrified all these broadcasters/journalists are of him.

 

It's actually pretty pathetic.

 

 

 

"Chappers" is a manc fan

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The Truth is Out There - The Dim in Beirut

 

City Fans: Here's Evidence Of The United Referee Conspiracy - Sabotage Times

 

 

These articles about referees and man yoo. I've just been talking about it with a manc at work (who's otherwise a nice guy). He raised the question about how the figures in the article stack up against averages and he's probably got a point. There's not a lot in these articles about average games reffed per team per ref per year, the bloke who wrote them tends to use extremes like Clattenburg v Webb.

 

I'm convinced Ferguson has undue influence on the game and match officials

For instance, last night he was fuming at the officials at full time about Carroll's human missile launch on Evra and DeGea (good work Andy). Lo and behold in the second half they're handed a second half equaliser from a blatantly offside Van Persie strike.

 

However, I'm wondering if anyone has any averages on referees, how often they ref other teams and how ref selection works. Is there an elite group of "top" referees who are picked for bigger games for example?

 

Usual small minded, small time, slightly paranoid, mostly ignorant Lurtz.

 

Take a bow.

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The best is how Everton are praised for their tough play at Arsenal - the usual hacking, kicking, tugging shite we know well. Moyes even made some remark about how football is played in the North.

 

Now slur is screaming about rough play from WHU and...? Fecking joke.

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No, let's not lose sight of the fact that he was right to be annoyed at the "challenge" Carroll made for the ball at the end of the first half. It was outrageous.

 

However, the referee obviously felt that he had to then book him for nothing at the first opportunity in the second half, which is another matter altogether and points to something more disturbing.

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Usual small minded, small time, slightly paranoid, mostly ignorant Lurtz.

 

Take a bow.

 

If you red the post properly you crackhead you'd have noticed that I'm asking questions about stats and about those articles.

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