Quantcast
Depression - Page 2 - GF - General Forum - The Liverpool Way Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Guest LFD
I honestly think depression and most conditions are something you can be talked into. When I fell off my bike I was nearly sectioned.

 

Mental lllness is a mile away.

 

It probably can be talked into.

 

But then again it can also not be underestimated how serious it can be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had very sever postnatal depression, resulted in social services involvement for the younger kids and them being put on the register due to the risk of emotional harm on their development ect...

 

I was proper nuts, mind. I couldn't utter a sentence without counting every letter in every word and it ending on an even numbered letter, if it didn't i would keep talking until it did. Sleep just wasn't happening. I was suicidal, it was going to happen by either me throwing myself down the stairs onto the slate floor, or crashing into a wall. It had to look like an accident, for the kids sake. There was never more then a pack of paracetamol in the house and we had no knives at the time either. I self harmed, not in the usual cutting like most do, i would bang the back of my head (hair would cover any bruising) against the slate wall, loved the hot warming sensation if provided when i'd bashed it hard enough, the pain would stop me thinking momentarily.

 

I went on trycyclics, old school but it wasn't so much a mood stabilising drug i needed, it was something to stop the thought patterns from firing at the speed they were at and allowing me time to just stop and not think so to speak.

 

Sleep and actually getting some made a difference for me along with the meds, the days between the 'dark' days increased, and when i did have down days i recognised it for what it was, just a day and tomorrow may be better. I still have shit days, we all have shit days, i know they're not depression, they're just shit days. If things are taking too long to pick back up i'll stop and examine why. I find if i can pin point a reason it stops things spiraling out of control.

 

Chin up lovely, you'll get there. x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I honestly think depression and most conditions are something you can be talked into. When I fell off my bike I was nearly sectioned.

 

Mental lllness is a mile away.

Not in my experience...and I say that as a qualified Mental Health Officer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloody hell, has everyone on here had depression? Should I be surprised that the denizens of an internet forum suffer from depression.

 

I've never had it because I'm a bit of self absorbed cunt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That last post of mine was very Silverlining-esque. I dedicate it to his memory.

 

Surely SL would have called everyone else self absorbed cunts not referred to himself as one?

 

Cath I've sent you a pm in lieu of posting on here as we've spoken about my issues before and I don't really want to go on about it on here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Surely SL would have called everyone else self absorbed cunts not referred to himself as one?

 

Cath I've sent you a pm in lieu of posting on here as we've spoken about my issues before and I don't really want to go on about it on here.

 

You may be right. I'll still dedicate it to him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reportedly its 1:4, but that's only reported, some stats reckon its as high 1:2.

 

And when it's people who spend a lot of time on an internet forum it seems it's something like 75%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And when it's people who spend a lot of time on an internet forum it seems it's something like 75%.

 

I doubt 75% of forumites will post in here, but should it really surprise you if most of the ones who do have some kind of interest in the subject?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I doubt 75% of forumites will post in here, but should it really surprise you if most of the ones who do have some kind of interest in the subject?

 

I'll be honest, it's blown me away how many have already said they've had(have) it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest LFD
I doubt 75% of forumites will post in here, but should it really surprise you if most of the ones who do have some kind of interest in the subject?

 

Indeed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I share Jules's surprise at so many having felt it. Very surprised with Cath as she always seems so upbeat and happy, which in itself is a lesson in how easily it can be concealed to those of us who haven't suffered.

 

I've got no words of wisdom to offer anyone, except 44 years has told me it's better to share your problems (of any type) with others rather than to bottle them up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll be honest, it's blown me away how many have already said they've had(have) it.

 

It's a very common thing to fall into at some period in a lifetime, but very rarely talked about, although that's changing.

 

When I had what I can only term a nervous breakdown, I spent a month or more making up different excuses to have time off work, until it got to the point where I had to go and see the doctor or lose my job, and they signed me off work immediately, but it took me six weeks before I could tell my partner because I was embarrassed about it, didn't really understand it or believe it could affect me, and didn't feel like it was something I could admit to. I was getting up in the morning, pretending to go to work, and then coming home.

 

It took six months to tell anyone else in my family, and I was signed off work with it for over a year before finally losing my job, then it took another eighteen months to get to the point now where I think I can say with some confidence that I'm over it, but still most of my family have no idea about it.

 

It's only with reluctance that I'm even posting this now, but I think it's something that should and has to be talked about for people to understand it, so I'm trying to overcome my natural reticence on the subject to do so.

 

Depression is different for every single person who experiences it, but if you've never experienced it, you can't know how debilitating it is for those who do. I would compare my experience with it to badly breaking both my legs, it had that much of an effect on my life, although with broken legs you can still use a wheelchair.

 

In the worst grip of it, I couldn't even get out of bed most days, let alone eat, shower, take any interest in anything, or do any of the things which might have helped me to slowly rebuild my life. People talk about exercise, and it's true that it helps massively, but the problem with depression, I found, was that you just can't motivate yourself to go and do exercise. Strangely enough I did keep going on the internet and playing computer games and shit, but that's a trick of distraction. It was either that or stare at the ceiling.

 

In the end, I tried over two years of seeing therapists and taking fucking horrible medication which made me insomniac at times, hypersomniac at others, dried up my mouth all the time, made me clench my jaws all day and night, and made me nauseous, and none of that really worked all that much, although it probably all had a cumulative effect, and I would say it was all worthwhile to some degree.

 

I think what finally sorted me out in the end though was just finding enough energy to go out and do some voluntary work, which started to make me feel good about myself again, to the point where I did some more of it, and that had a snowball effect on me. It probably helped that the voluntary work I liked most was doing hard physical work delivering second hand furniture to people who had fuck all.

 

It's a funny thing though; I wouldn't change what happened to me, because having gone through it, I've learned a lot about myself, and I'm not going to settle any more for things in my life which I don't want in it. I don't know exactly what made me the person I used to be, but I'm a massively changed person now as a result of that breakdown, and a much, much better one. I liken it personally to a steam valve that maybe stopped the engine from blowing up.

 

I don't think I will fall into it again, but if I do I know how to get out, not that what I learned could help anyone else necessarily, because at the end of the day you can only really support someone with depression; they have to take the road out of it themselves.

 

If there is some simple advice I could give to anyone it would be don't be afraid to ask for help, ask for what you want in life, and that things will generally get better at some point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I share Jules's surprise at so many having felt it. Very surprised with Cath as she always seems so upbeat and happy, which in itself is a lesson in how easily it can be concealed to those of us who haven't suffered.

 

I've got no words of wisdom to offer anyone, except 44 years has told me it's better to share your problems (of any type) with others rather than to bottle them up.

 

Which is in part why (a) I am posting now, but also (b) why I delayed posting because I have felt like such a fraud being able to post as I have on here when feeling like shit and in answer to (b) for fear that people might dismiss what I was saying and by association may others who may disclose to them similar previously hidden feelings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest LFD
It's a very common thing to fall into at some period in a lifetime, but very rarely talked about, although that's changing.

 

When I had what I can only term a nervous breakdown, I spent a month or more making up different excuses to have time off work, until it got to the point where I had to go and see the doctor or lose my job, and they signed me off work immediately, but it took me six weeks before I could tell my partner because I was embarrassed about it, didn't really understand it or believe it could affect me, and didn't feel like it was something I could admit to. I was getting up in the morning, pretending to go to work, and then coming home.

 

It took six months to tell anyone else in my family, and I was signed off work with it for over a year before finally losing my job, then it took another eighteen months to get to the point now where I think I can say with some confidence that I'm over it, but still most of my family have no idea about it.

 

It's only with reluctance that I'm even posting this now, but I think it's something that should and has to be talked about for people to understand it, so I'm trying to overcome my natural reticence on the subject to do so.

 

Depression is different for every single person who experiences it, but if you've never experienced it, you can't know how debilitating it is for those who do. I would compare my experience with it to badly breaking both my legs, it had that much of an effect on my life, although with broken legs you can still use a wheelchair.

 

In the worst grip of it, I couldn't even get out of bed most days, let alone eat, shower, take any interest in anything, or do any of the things which might have helped me to slowly rebuild my life. People talk about exercise, and it's true that it helps massively, but the problem with depression, I found, was that you just can't motivate yourself to go and do exercise. Strangely enough I did keep going on the internet and playing computer games and shit, but that's a trick of distraction. It was either that or stare at the ceiling.

 

In the end, I tried over two years of seeing therapists and taking fucking horrible medication which made me insomniac at times, hypersomniac at others, dried up my mouth all the time, made me clench my jaws all day and night, and made me nauseous, and none of that really worked all that much, although it probably all had a cumulative effect, and I would say it was all worthwhile to some degree.

 

I think what finally sorted me out in the end though was just finding enough energy to go out and do some voluntary work, which started to make me feel good about myself again, to the point where I did some more of it, and that had a snowball effect on me. It probably helped that the voluntary work I liked most was doing hard physical work delivering second hand furniture to people who had fuck all.

 

It's a funny thing though; I wouldn't change what happened to me, because having gone through it, I've learned a lot about myself, and I'm not going to settle any more for things in my life which I don't want in it. I don't know exactly what made me the person I used to be, but I'm a massively changed person now as a result of that breakdown, and a much, much better one. I liken it personally to a steam valve that maybe stopped the engine from blowing up.

 

I don't think I will fall into it again, but if I do I know how to get out, not that what I learned could help anyone else necessarily, because at the end of the day you can only really support someone with depression; they have to take the road out of it themselves.

 

If there is some simple advice I could give to anyone it would be don't be afraid to ask for help, ask for what you want in life, and that things will generally get better at some point.

 

Would rep that if I could.

 

Great post and totally agree with all of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So what sparked it? If you don't want to tell that's fine by the way.

 

It's hard to say. I don't think there was a specific thing which sparked it off.

 

Looking back on it, I had probably been putting it off for twenty years with drugs and alcohol though. I was one of these people that manage to function in life and hold down a job whilst not really being very happy I suppose, although you wouldn't have known that about me.

 

I can point to some things in my youth that definitely contributed, but mostly I think I just never learned to deal with my emotions properly, and that all added up on me to the point where it eventually stopped me in my tracks.

 

At the heart of it was a lot of self-hatred though. There's a saying that depression is anger turned inwards, which might seem counter-intuitive, but in my case there's a lot of truth to it.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some superbly written descriptions in this thread. Like others have said I'm shocked by the sheer number of people who have experienced it in some shape or form. Thankfully I've no experience of it but talking, even among strangers on here can only be a good thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one here, don't really have time to post about it in detail. Kicked off by the death of my mother, but was always underlying from an unhappy childhood. Like Zig, I put it off via a cocktail of booze, nights out and gear. On top of a hugely stressful workplace. In the end caught up with me.

 

Small course of therapy, 5 x 1 sessions. Found it really good just to talk meaningfully with a professional. Also short course of drugs I took the very minimum, 6 months and wanted off. Loads of exercise helped too.

 

5 years on, healther than ever, fitter than ever, got a Masters in that time, quit bifters, drink less, found the missus, promotion and at peace with myself. I have the odd low day, but usually blitz 5 or 10k to balance me up.

 

As Bob Hoskins once said its good to talk. Although the other stuff was good too.

 

It's really more common than you think. You're in good company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's good to talk about it even if it just helps someone who hasn't experienced it to understand what it is. I was probably a bit disparaging of it before I went through it to be honest. I'm from a generation where people were supposed to get on with stuff and pull themselves together. An awful lot of people never let on about it until the point where suddenly they commit suicide and it seems like it's out of the blue. You can't always tell someone is suffering from depression unless they do have a breakdown of some sort.

 

If you do manage to talk about it and get help, you're on the right track though.

 

Except in very, very few cases, where it's a permanent medical condition, you will get over it eventually. More so with help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest LFD
I think it's good to talk about it even if it just helps someone who hasn't experienced it to understand what it is. I was probably a bit disparaging of it before I went through it to be honest. I'm from a generation where people were supposed to get on with stuff and pull themselves together. An awful lot of people never let on about it until the point where suddenly they commit suicide and it seems like it's out of the blue. You can't always tell someone is suffering from depression unless they do have a breakdown of some sort.

 

Yes again I agree.

 

None of my family or friends had a clue.

 

I was extremely sociable (still am), played loads of sport, always out laughing and partying.

 

But I was hiding the problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. My childhood was boss, I've never smoked and taken drugs and rarely gamble or drink. Life could be better but I've always been thankful for the many good things that have happened in my life whenever something bad has happened. Life isn't perfect and it never will be.

 

That's one reason why I'll never join Facebook. Just a collection of people saying how great their life is when reality is it's all front.

 

Misanthrope me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

In the worst grip of it, I couldn't even get out of bed most days, let alone eat, shower, take any interest in anything, or do any of the things which might have helped me to slowly rebuild my life. People talk about exercise, and it's true that it helps massively, but the problem with depression, I found, was that you just can't motivate yourself to go and do exercise. Strangely enough I did keep going on the internet and playing computer games and shit, but that's a trick of distraction. It was either that or stare at the ceiling.

 

 

It's a funny thing though; I wouldn't change what happened to me, because having gone through it, I've learned a lot about myself, and I'm not going to settle any more for things in my life which I don't want in it. I don't know exactly what made me the person I used to be, but I'm a massively changed person now as a result of that breakdown, and a much, much better one. I liken it personally to a steam valve that maybe stopped the engine from blowing up.

 

My 'strangely enough' has/was been getting out on my bike, and why its been so galling coming off it and not being able to get out.....even at my lowest, points, when I could barely get out of bed, I could get up to go out on my bike...another thing that made me feel like a fraud....'if she can get up and got out and cycle for miles, there cant be that much wrong' I sort of believed that myself but, besides the endorphin boost which I discovered only had short lived effects once I'd finished my ride, I rationalised it in times of when I was out on my bike no-one could ask anything of me....I could just sort of disappear

 

And the other bit, awful as it is and upset as I am at the thought of slipping back there now I absolutely agree with you that I wouldnt change what has happened as it has probably saved my marriage and brought me closer to my brother (and his wife) in a way that I dont know could have been achieved in any other way. It was him confiding in me that gave me permission to acknowledge my own feelings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My 'strangely enough' has/was been getting out on my bike, and why its been so galling coming off it and not being able to get out.....even at my lowest, points, when I could barely get out of bed, I could get up to go out on my bike...another thing that made me feel like a fraud....'if she can get up and got out and cycle for miles, there cant be that much wrong' I sort of believed that myself but, besides the endorphin boost which I discovered only had short lived effects once I'd finished my ride, I rationalised it in times of when I was out on my bike no-one could ask anything of me....I could just sort of disappear

 

And the other bit, awful as it is and upset as I am at the thought of slipping back there now I absolutely agree with you that I wouldnt change what has happened as it has probably saved my marriage and brought me closer to my brother (and his wife) in a way that I dont know could have been achieved in any other way. It was him confiding in me that gave me permission to acknowledge my own feelings

 

It must actually be very difficult that the thing which gave you some relief from it ended up hurting you. I'm not surprised you're feeling low at the moment Cath. You'll get better and get out there on the bike again though, just keep hanging in there and take the support that comes your way. Seeing a professional about it will help. It gives you a lot of perspective just to articulate your feelings to someone else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Available Subscriptions

  • Last Match Report

  • Latest Posts

    • Spurs seem to be having a defensive clearout. Aside from the fact that it's about time some of their better players (like Eriksen) get linked elsewhere they way all our better players always seemed to until recently, they'd have to spend big on a number of defenders. £30m seems to be the going rate for potential, rising to about £50m for English players thanks to the English tax, and since the likes of Trippier, Alderweireld and Rose have all been linked with moves away, that's probably £100m minimum just to stand still.   I'm surprised that Atletico are pushing for Trippier at £20m when Dani Alves (although older and probably wanting more money) is still available for free.
    • Didn't that 'esk' fella say they've spent £1m a month so far on plans for the stadium, if I was Meis I'd have all that too and be laughing all the way to the bank.    Why don't they also claim that the new stadium will also solve world hunger, cause world peace and bring in an era of complete nuclear disarmament, doesn't sound so far fetched when you see what bitters think.    So a stadium by a sewerage works, a team that is mainly mid-table, who will use that stadium probably 20 out of 365 days will solve all of Liverpool's problems in that area. What of the new issues that taking that stadium away from Goodison might cause?   Actually, I don't buy into their begging tactics. The area around Anfield (including around their wooden hut) benefits more from us than them right now. We (according to them) bring in far more visitors to the city and generally a lot more often than them. Costco probably has more visitors in a year than Everton would at the dock, and they'd spend more and they'd undoubtedly leave happier.      Admit it, they pick up that massive Main Stand that winds you up so much you blocked off part of your ground so your fans wouldn't have to look at it. They wouldn't want them waking up, realising that they are being taken for mugs.             
    • He’s married to Steph Houghton, who captained England in the World Cup. She plays for Man City. She only has a younger brother so I’ve no idea who CD is talking about.
    • Good chunk of wages saved also
  • Latest Round Up

  • Popular Contributors

×