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Shooter in the Motor

Sharks (and all things oceany)

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5 minutes ago, Lee909 said:

Bull sharks are worse

From Wiki on Bull Sharks:

 

Since bull sharks often dwell in very shallow waters, are found in many types of habitats, are territorial by nature, and have virtually no tolerance for provocation, they may be more dangerous to humans than any other species of shark and along with the tiger shark and great white shark, are among the three shark species most likely to bite humans.

 

One or several bull sharks may have been responsible for the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916, which were the inspiration for Peter Benchley's novel Jaws. The speculation of bull sharks possibly being responsible is based on two fatal bites occurring in brackish and fresh water.

 

The bull shark is responsible for biting swimmers around the Sydney Harbour inlets. Most of these bites were previously attributed to Great White sharks. In India, bull sharks swim up the Ganges River and have bitten bathers. Many of these bite incidents were attributed to the Ganges shark, Glyphis gangeticus, a critically endangered river shark species, although the sand tiger shark was also blamed during the 1960s and 1970s.

 

The bull shark prefers coastal water, which is less than 100 feet in depth. This is mostly due to their feeding patterns, since they prefer murky waters. This is also a problem, since this gives them the most interaction with humans. It is known that bull sharks inhabit areas off the coast of Florida, and there have been reports of bull sharks getting close enough to the coast to bite humans, since the bull shark is a territorial animal, which encourages aggressive behavior.

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Great White,Tigers and Bull Sharks(Zambezi Sharks as they are also called) are the three man eaters and the Bull Sharks are probably the worst due to hunting in the shallows and even lakes. Crocs and Bull Sharks sometimes cross paths too.

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2 minutes ago, Shooter in the Motor said:

From Wiki on Bull Sharks:

 

Since bull sharks often dwell in very shallow waters, are found in many types of habitats, are territorial by nature, and have virtually no tolerance for provocation, they may be more dangerous to humans than any other species of shark and along with the tiger shark and great white shark, are among the three shark species most likely to bite humans.

 

One or several bull sharks may have been responsible for the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916, which were the inspiration for Peter Benchley's novel Jaws. The speculation of bull sharks possibly being responsible is based on two fatal bites occurring in brackish and fresh water.

 

The bull shark is responsible for biting swimmers around the Sydney Harbour inlets. Most of these bites were previously attributed to Great White sharks. In India, bull sharks swim up the Ganges River and have bitten bathers. Many of these bite incidents were attributed to the Ganges shark, Glyphis gangeticus, a critically endangered river shark species, although the sand tiger shark was also blamed during the 1960s and 1970s.

 

The bull shark prefers coastal water, which is less than 100 feet in depth. This is mostly due to their feeding patterns, since they prefer murky waters. This is also a problem, since this gives them the most interaction with humans. It is known that bull sharks inhabit areas off the coast of Florida, and there have been reports of bull sharks getting close enough to the coast to bite humans, since the bull shark is a territorial animal, which encourages aggressive behavior.

You just beat me to it.

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3 minutes ago, VladimirIlyich said:

You just beat me to it.

If I'm honest, I'd never really heard of the Bull Shark. To think it could be considered the most dangerous to humans is very surprising as it gets very little attention. You could be walking on shallow waters on beaches and have this shark come and try you with beans. Fuck.

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Bull sharks look very similar to great whites and are often mistaken for them. It's the fact they can live in fresh water too that makes them so dangerous. 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Lee909 said:

Bull sharks look very similar to great whites and are often mistaken for them. It's the fact they can live in fresh water too that makes them so dangerous. 

 

 

I saw that, that must be quite rare for fish to be able to switch between salt water and fresh water. 

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Not sure about smaller fish but for a apex predator yeah. Can only think of a few reptiles that can do it. 

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I love the clean and pretty much all marine life but Squids and Jellyfish are fucking horrible. Went to one of the nicest beaches I've ever been on in Queensland and couldn't even swim in the sea because of the box jellyfish cunts. 

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5 minutes ago, Bjornebye said:

I love the clean and pretty much all marine life but Squids and Jellyfish are fucking horrible. Went to one of the nicest beaches I've ever been on in Queensland and couldn't even swim in the sea because of the box jellyfish cunts. 

Jellyfish are the Sergio Ramos of the oceans. Right dirty twats who cause lots of damage. Australia's oceans seem to be the place where all the killers of the oceans thrive.

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-45967535

 

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Imagine befriending an octopus, swimming alongside the much-feared great white shark, having your face stroked by a rarely seen clawless otter and cradling a wild rock fish in your hands.

 

These fascinating, life changing experiences have been documented by South Africans Craig Foster and Ross Frylinck in a newly released book entitled Sea Change - Primal Joy and the Art of Underwater Tracking following eight years of diving without wetsuits and scuba gear in the icy waters of Cape Town.

 

Mr Foster said he developed an amazing relationship with an octopus during the course of his daily dives into what he described as the "golden" underwater kelp forest outside Simon's Town, which lies on the Atlantic side of the Cape peninsula.

 

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"I had the privilege of visiting this incredible animal for almost a year. It totally trusted me, lost all fear, it would take me on hunting expeditions and let me into its secret world.

 

"Octopuses have different personalities, some are quite bold, others very shy, she was in between," Mr Foster told the BBC, describing how she would come over and greet him when she became accustomed to his visits.

 

"It is a great privilege to step into that world to learn - not like a mammal - but like a fellow spineless creature in her invertebrate world," he said.

 

Her den was mainly a hole she had dug in the ocean floor, which the diver described as a "proper home".

"She hunts over 50 species but you can only find that out when you're allowed into her den and can pick up the bones of the animals she has eaten," he said, referring to the lobster and crab shells he saw.

 

"You realise, my goodness, her life is so detailed and crazily connected to everything around her."


The diver has also had amazing encounters with great white sharks, possibly some of the ones that have been responsible for attacks on surfers and bathers on surfers and bathers in nearby False Bay over the years.

 

Unlike the aggressive hunters of human flesh they are often portrayed to be, he paints a totally different picture of a magnificent serene animal.

 

_104026528_120531f7-e20c-48f7-bf5b-c02ed

 

"When the great white sees a human it scans us, its search image is picking up something that's not prey. They are not sure what we are, they may be curious but it's not something that's good for them to eat and they know that.

 

"They aren't animals that are after us, if they were, there would be attacks every day. If they see a seal, a fish or some of the other prey that's a different story but humans are not on their menu.

 

"The one attack a year is an aberration. There's something in that person they attack that's triggering a response in that shark, it's incredibly rare. Maybe it's the muscle tension that's high, maybe the shark is in a bad mood.

 

"I have made eye contact with them. I once had five great whites circling me in open water and I could see no aggression towards me whatsoever," Mr Foster said.

 

"I've had a couple of close meetings with Tiger Sharks but they're also very gentle if you're relaxed. These animals are not the killers they're made out to be."

 

Mr Frylinck, despite a scary maiden encounter with a big shark, has also become more comfortable with the much-feared animal.

 

"White sharks very rarely enter the kelp forest, they patrol the fringes. They swim around this bay which has one of the highest concentrations of white sharks in the world.

 

"One day we were swimming around the edge of the forest and Craig's friend Danny, who was with us, told me a white shark had just swum three to four metres away from my shoulder and had watched me quite intently. He described it as an absolute monster - between four and five metres," Mr Frylinck said.

Underwater tracks


Mr Foster, an award-wining film-maker of natural history, managed to adapt to the underwater world the tracking techniques he learnt in the Kalahari desert from the San people, widely regarded as being the best trackers in the world.

 

_104026527_bc2fb97f-df35-42a0-bfea-b1f92

 

"It involves a number of things like looking at subtle changes in sand and sand texture to see what animals have been around, looking to see if, for example, there's been a kill, if a worm has been digging, slime trails, egg casings - there are a multitude of signs underwater.

 

"Initially I thought it would be impossible to try and track underwater but I was desperate to try and break into this very cryptic world," he said.

 

"This crazy idea was in my mind for a long time and then eventually I started seeing the first underwater tracks, that's when I first thought it could work but I had no idea that I could develop it into such a detailed way understanding of animals underwater."

 


It was this understanding that led to Mr Foster uncovering eight new species of shrimp, one of which - Heteromysis Fosteri - has been named after him.

 

The three new species, mostly bright red to orange in colour with series of either spots or stripes, belong to the genus Heteromysis and differ from previously known species by colour pattern, eye shape and the patterns of spines on their legs and tails.

 

_104026530_95f7ff13-934d-4d65-a222-8ccfd

 

Having managed to meet his commitment to do 365 dives a year, he said his interaction with sea life has made him realise the importance of changing the way he lives.

 

"The whole way I've been taught by other humans to live on this planet is completely unsustainable and I've also realised that these animals, particularly the phytoplankton, provide the oxygen for every breath I take. They provide the basis for every meal I have.

 

"They have taught me that all the financial, political and other issues we hear about in the news are inconsequential compared to that natural foundation that holds everything up and we're chipping away at it," Mr Foster said.

 

"We need to nurture it rather than doing the opposite."

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3 hours ago, Shooter in the Motor said:

If I'm honest, I'd never really heard of the Bull Shark. To think it could be considered the most dangerous to humans is very surprising as it gets very little attention. You could be walking on shallow waters on beaches and have this shark come and try you with beans. Fuck.

Even Bull Sharks would never touch beans.

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23 minutes ago, VladimirIlyich said:

Even Bull Sharks would never touch beans.

Heard they'll eat the tin but only without the beans inside

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Met a boatie Aussie dude when I was in Queensland and he said he'd seen a ruck between a Croc and a Shark in a river his boat was on. He said the Croc won and he wasn't surprised because it was much bigger.

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1 minute ago, Remmie said:

Met a boatie Aussie dude when I was in Queensland and he said he'd seen a ruck between a Croc and a Shark in a river his boat was on. He said the Croc won and he wasn't surprised because it was much bigger.

Went on a crocodile cruise down the Daintree River over there. Saw a croc on the shoreline and it was fucking gigantic. 

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Yeah big Salt Water crocs are a third of the size bigger than bull sharks and add that to the armoured back its no surprise. Out in bay though be a bit different than river

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2 minutes ago, Lee909 said:

Yeah big Salt Water crocs are a third of the size bigger than bull sharks and add that to the armoured back its no surprise. Out in bay though be a bit different than river

Yeah home advantage definitely counts with them cunts. 

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Y'all know me.  Know what I do for a living.  Well, chief, I value my neck a lot more than three thousand bucks. I will find him for three, but I'll catch him, and kill him, for ten.

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There is a fella,maybe called Mark Marks(Not to be confused with the underwear singer Marky Mark as he would soil his underwear) who swims outside a cage with great whites. Fascinating stuff but not for the faint hearted.

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16 minutes ago, VladimirIlyich said:

There is a fella,maybe called Mark Marks(Not to be confused with the underwear singer Marky Mark as he would soil his underwear) who swims outside a cage with great whites. Fascinating stuff but not for the faint hearted.

That kind of thing is all dead clever until one of them great whites thinks "I wonder what this pink bendy fucker tastes like?", then its game over. 

 

Like that smartarse that thought he was right in with them bears. Until they scoffed him.

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Still the only scene in any movie that gave me nightmares.

I remember seeing it at the movies knowing it was coming and yet is still made me jump back into my seat terrified

I must have kipped with the light on for about a fortnight.

 

That was till my wife got pissed off and told me to pull myself together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Stickman said:

Still the only scene in any movie that gave me nightmares.

I remember seeing it at the movies knowing it was coming and yet is still made me jump back into my seat terrified

I must have kipped with the light on for about a fortnight.

 

That was till my wife got pissed off and told me to pull myself together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scared the shit out of me too and I was only a kid at the time. Started my fascination with sharks though,and crocodiles became part of that interest. They should be respected and feared too. Never ever share the same bath tub as them no matter how big that bath is!

 

PS,The Alligator River is not full of cowardly alligators,those explorers made a very big mistake!

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