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Denny Crane

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About Denny Crane

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  1. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    I mean that sounds an awful lot like - we won the possession.
  2. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    I agree it isn't a principled stance just commentating on how Labour view it. Maybe when the Greens wipe your lot out we can go for it.
  3. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    Despite all the talk of disastrous defeats they don't seem open to more debate - the last time they they lent votes to widen the debate Corbyn won is what a few are thinking. With Clive Lewis he is rightfully proposing open selection but MPs don't want to nominate a person who challenges the legtimacy of their position. I'm sceptical of PR but after four election defeats and a change in demographics it is hard to ignore the case for at least being much more open and receptive. I doubt Labour would be interested in PR until they lost even more seats though. If they get enough seats and are in power you ignore PR if you have fewer seats you want it.
  4. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    Sounds like Liverpool council were prosecuting too many slum landlords. The council has carried out over 37,000 compliance actions, issued more than 2,500 legal and fixed penalty notices and prosecuted almost 250 landlords. The impact has meant that Liverpool alone has been responsible for 389% of the 460% national rise in prosecutions between 2012 and 2018.
  5. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    I didn’t think you held strong views on income tax as running a small business your tax arrangements would be different to a straight employee. I do recall you holding firm views on Corporation Tax that inferred they should be low. I know Labour and the Lib Dems had proposals on Capital Gains Tax but Labour had some additional tweaks that you had an issue with.
  6. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    Not sure where you are going with this. The primary argument for opposition to tax rises were it’s my money I will lose out.
  7. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    I don’t keep a list but last time I checked modest increases proposed by Labour to Income tax and Corporation tax were a redline for some on here. It was as much an observation on the IMF and where they are now as those defending that position.
  8. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    Here is a link mentioned above to the chief of the IMF.
  9. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    In other news Rachel Reeves has put herself forward to be shadow chancellor.
  10. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    Well well even the IMF are calling for taxing the rich and greater spending on social programs. They acknowledge higher taxes at the top end don't damage the economy. Puts some posters on here and some Labour MPs to the right of the IMF.
  11. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    How are they going to pay for it.
  12. Denny Crane

    Monarchy

    Prince of woke and rogue royals made me laugh - and the first 17 pages dedicated to them in the Daily Mail apparently.
  13. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    With the focus rightly on Labour due to the size of the defeat but this is an interesting piece. Maybe the seats the Tory party won in old Labour areas will stop the Singapore model being implemented. But with the likes of Raab, Javid, Fox, Mogg and the rest all having the ear of Johnson it is hard to see it as anything other than a race to the bottom. It wasn’t just the Labour party that took a beating in last month’s general election. So too, but much less remarked, did right-libertarianism. The Tories won on policies that repudiated many of their professed beliefs: a higher minimum wage; increased public spending; and the manpower planning that is a points-based immigration policy. And the manifesto (pdf) promise to “ensure that there is a proper balance between the rights of individuals, our vital national security and effective government” should also alarm libertarians. John Harris quotes an anonymous minister as saying that the libertarianism of Britannia Unchained is “all off the agenda” and that “some of the things we’ve celebrated have led us astray.” Tories are not out of step with public opinion here. If anything, it is even more antipathetic to right-libertarianism than are Tories. Most voters support higher income taxes on the rich, a wealth tax, and nationalizing the railways, for example. Rick was right months ago to say: A bit of me sympathizes with right-libertarians here. I suspect that one reason for public antipathy to free markets is that people under-appreciate the virtue of spontaneous order – that emergent processes can sometimes deliver better outcomes than state direction. Nevertheless, all this raises a question: why are we not seeing more opposition to Johnsonian Toryism from right-libertarians? You might think its because right-libertarianism has morphed into support for Brexit. Whilst I don’t wish to deny there is some link between the two, many Brexiter MPs have failed a basic test of libertarianism. In 2018 the likes of Bridgen, Cash, Duncan-Smith, Rees-Mogg and Francois all voted against legalizing cannabis. One possibility is that they regard him as the lesser of two evils – they are supporting him with a heavy heart. A second possibility has been described by Tyler Cowen. Intelligent right-libs have realized that free markets are not the panacea they thought and have shifted their priorities towards improving state capacity. Examples of this might – in different ways – be Dominic Cummings or Sam Bowman. Perhaps relatedly, right-libertarianism has lost its material constituency. It once appealed to people by offering tax cuts. Today, however, many of the sort of businessmen who in the 80s wanted lower taxes now want other things, such as better infrastructure. If these are respectable reasons for the decline of right-libertarianism, I suspect there are less reputable ones. One is that we have lost the cast of mind which underpins right-libertarianism – that of an awareness of the limits of one’s knowledge. We need freedom, thought Hayek, because we cannot fully understand or predict society: We live, however, in an age of narcissistic blowhards who are overconfident about everything. This is a climate which undervalues freedom. Worse still, I suspect that some right-libertarians were never really sincere anyway. They professed a love of freedom only as a stick with which to beat the old Soviet Union. Liberty was only ever a poor second to shilling for the rich. And their antipathy to Gordon Brown was founded not upon a rightful distaste for the authoritarian streak in his thinking but upon simple tribalism. Maybe Corey Robin was right: This isn't just a UK phenomenon, illustrated by Paul Staines: some (not all) US libertarians found it easy to throw in their lot with Trump. Whatever the reason for the demise of right-libertarianism, however, there is perhaps another lesson to be taken from it – that you cannot nowadays achieve much political change via thinktanks alone. https://stumblingandmumbling.typepad.com/stumbling_and_mumbling/2020/01/the-strange-death-of-libertarian-england.html
  14. Denny Crane

    Monarchy

    Jan window who's available. Kim and Kanye, could be good for the ratings.
  15. Denny Crane

    The New Leader of the Labour Party

    With the guido stuff and now the comments about McClusky there does seem quite a bit of misinformation being directed towards RLB.
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