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Showing content with the highest reputation on 20/01/19 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    This from Bascombe made me laugh Roy Hodgson has never had a side play so well at Anfield, which is some achievement given that he once was the manager here.
  2. 6 points
    Never met my Dad's father. I literally know nothing about him. My Dad told me more about Bill Shankly than my own grandad. My mum had two dad's. Her biological dad who died before I was born was shot in the war and only had one lung. He was sent to a recovery hospital in Hoylake and died when my Mum was young. My Nan remarried to a fella who ran his own transport company and was quite well off. He was also in the war in numerous places. My dad told me that they were in a pub in Blackpool once and this fella with a false leg marched over to him and hugged him. My grandad looked at him and asked him what he was doing. The fella said "i was on the beach in Dunkirk and had my leg blown off, you picked me up and carried me off the beach when bullets were flying everywhere". My grandad asked him how he knew it was him. He said "your nose mate, your nose is fucking massive and it's the one thing I remembered before I passed out in agonising pain". Apparently this fella had been trying to trace him for years. He was a harsh fella though and the tightest cunt you could have ever met. Probably where my ma gets it from. When he died and his house got sold I got £500. Me and my mate decided to go to Munich for a beer and footy weekend. My ma called me disrespectful by spending his money going to Germany as he'd nearly died countless times fighting them!
  3. 5 points
    Rooney held Ferguson over the barrel at least twice -- mooting moves to City in 2010 & 2013. What did Ferguson do? Absolutely nothing -- other than to sign Rooney up to a bumper contract because United knew that in that moment, with Ronaldo recently departed and City/Chelsea lurking, Rooney had the power. And speaking of Ronaldo - he spent years being indulged & having his ego massaged at United until he finally got the move to Madrid he'd agonised for. It was well-known under Ferguson that the really great players at that club got different treatment to the rest (see: kung-fu kicking liability but genius-on-the-pitch Eric Cantona). So this "Ferguson would never have allowed that" is a tired analogy that doesn't chime with reality. And closer to home, how long did we play to the whims of Suarez and then Coutinho while both were verging on kicking & screaming to get out of the club? The Pogba-phenomenon is nothing new at all: there's been a Paul Pogba-esque character at many of the most successful club sides in history & its down to the manager how they handle it. Mourinho fucked it up big time -- as he's fucked up the relationships with many of the players across numerous clubs during the latter part of his career. When you take some of the finest technical footballers in the world (talking top 100, 200 players here) and try to shape them into the grotesque tactics Mourinho was adopting its little wonder that some of them will rebel. Mourinho is the anti-Klopp: whereas Klopp has always worked by unifying clubs & fanbases behind the team, Mourinho has thrived on summoning hate and bile. He's the Donald Trump of football, pursuing a boom-and-bust cycle of success with a neverending stream of convenient reasons as to why it all went tits up. This narrative of players downing tools is a really convenient way of disguising a simple truth - Mourinho bought shit players and employed shit tactics which bore fruit of shit results.
  4. 5 points
    The thing for me is that I'm so desperate for us to win it, I genuinely can't enjoy it and I really really want to. I went to my first match in 1977 so I've seen some of the greatest Liverpool sides to ever grace a pitch, but if we win it this year it will be up there with the best of them. Reason being, in times of financial doping, to do what we've done when we've had to sell to buy is nothing short of remarkable. We are in a great position and looking at the remaining fixtures, City have it all to do. 2014 was soul destroying but this would hurt so much more. No doubt City have the better individuals but we have the better team. It's the sum of the parts etc etc. I really do need to stop drinking.
  5. 5 points
  6. 4 points
    I only meant to type something brief. I've put it behind NSFW tags for those who don't want sentimentalist clap-trap forced on them... Warning! The following content is NOT WORK SAFE. Click the Show button to reveal. This is how I remember it. Maybe it didn't happen exactky like this. But this is how I remember it. My dad isn't in to footy. He's a quiet guy. Enjoys having his family around him. Likes a bit of gardening. I was like him in a lot of ways, but in others I was very different. I supported Liverpool. I loved footy. We weren't skint but we weren't loaded. I had a red and white hat and scarf - and my pride and joy a leather Liverpool football with red and white hexagons. An actual casey. I had seen the games on Telly and I had decided that I wanted to be part of it. The swaying crowd. The singing. However those crowds were my dad's nightmare. It just wasn't his thing. Maybe a bit out of his comfort zone. He wasn't keen. Dad guessed the fad would pass and I would move onto something else. But I didn't. I pestered him relentlessly to take me to a game. I had no idea that it wasn't really his thing. I just wasn't aware enough to sense it. One day he came home from work with two tickets. I couldn't believe it. I was actually going to a game. I remember looking at them so often that I know every inch of them. We did a dry run over to Liverpool a week or two before the game. Dad wanted to be sure he knew where he was going. To be honest I just thought it was day out. I didn't realise it was a dry run over so dad knew where he was going. I just thought it was a great day trip. Walking aaround an empty Anfield was different in them days. The houses came right up to the ground. No superstore trying to get your cash. In fact the shop was just a tiny corner shop type of thing. It was shut and had grill shutters down, but I still remember a Ray Clemence book on display in the window. I wondered if the shop was open would Dad get it for me? Eventually, the night of the match came around. It was cold. I had put on my hat and scarf a long time before dad got home from the factory. I had a pot noodle for tea. They were pretty new to the market. It tasted nice but I couldn't eat it. I was too excited. Mum insisted I took something to eat and made me a sandwich, but I didn't touch it. We were going to Liverpool!! I don't remember much else about the journey. My next memory is inside the ground. Walking up the steps of the Kemlyn Road stand. I remember going towards our entrance to our seats. All that stood in our way was a friendly looking steward shuffling foot-to-foot to keep warm. He spoke to my dad. "You can come in mate, but he'll have to stay here. He looks like one of them football hooligans." Dad laughed. I smiled although my mind was elsewhere. I was thinking the view was like from beyond that entrance. As we entered my senses were in overload. The grass was so green. Unbelievably bright green. The best grass I had ever seen in my life. The noise. The grass. The sounds. Unbelievable. Flags were waving. Red and white checkered flags. I struggled to take it all in as we took our seats. I can't remember much about the game, but I remember my dad saying "That's Cally. You're privileged to have seen him play, you know!". Maybe he did know something about footy after all. In my study there is some stuff hanging on the wall. My guitar. Some fancy love hearts the missus has hung up. And of course the ticket stubs from my first game. Dad kept them. He framed them and gave them to me a few years back. Bit faded, but they look great! Was it really 40-odd years ago? Dad's got Parkinson's now. Pretty much housebound. The most altruistic bloke I have ever met in my life. Would love to go one more game with him.
  7. 3 points
    My maternal grandfather died years before I was born and the only thing I have of his is his name. My paternal grandfather died when I was four but I still have vivid memories of him. He was typical of most Irishmen of his generation; hard working and tough as nails. He got a year long ban from attending GAA matches for hopping the fence to go join in on a fight. When we went to visit every second Sunday, my dad would buy a box of fags and give them to me to pass them on to him. When we got to house, I would give him the pack of ciggies, he would rub my hair and say "the blessings of God be on you." Apparently, my granny hated to see him smoking, so he would be delighted when one of his kids would sneak him a pack. Good thing he sired eleven of them, eight daughters and three sons. They lived a hard but happy life. My dad lived in house with a mud floor until he was five and still vividly remembers when they got their first telly. Sometimes, it's hard to believe, with all the modern comforts I and my peers enjoy, that I am only generation away from a life that hard. I was at my aunt's 70th birthday party last night and they had all eleven lined up for a photo. It was an amazing sight to behold in and of itself.
  8. 3 points
  9. 3 points
  10. 3 points
    *unfolds paper to reveal Dignitas form*
  11. 3 points
    My Paternal Grandad died sadly a few years before I was born but I've heard a lot told to me about him over the years. A republican who fought in the war of independence. He later became a founding member of Fianna Fail where I grew up and a foreman for the County Council and would cycle everyday to work. Managed to woo and marry my nan (also sadly long departed) at 44 despite being 20 years older than her and spent 20 happy years together before his death. Apparently a lovely kind man who sadly died from a brain tumour when he was 64. My dad to this day still chokes up when talking about him. My maternal Dad was a hardy little Welshman from Pontypool, worked down the mines until he joined the air force and became a navigator in WW2. His plane was shot down flying from France to England and they crash landed killing 3 of his party. He was in hospital for 2 years after. He was also a beautiful kind soul and I fondly remember him with his arms outstretched to meet me with this beaming smile whenever he called to our house. I moved to Ireland when I was very young and sadly didn't get to see much more of him before he died.
  12. 2 points
    It absolutely doesn’t auto-correct to that as a rule. Auto-correct also has an algorithm that will change a word to a similar word you regularly use, therefore exposing this lad’s level of obsession with us even further.
  13. 2 points
    Sack Rafa Benitez. Ignore Kenny. Give the job to this absolute fraud. A lot of water under the bridge since, but still infuriating.
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    Credit where it's due but Henderson is never a worry against low quality sides, it's against the top ones that he's completely outgunned. It's not his fault, it's just top trumps.
  17. 2 points
    Food science researchers at King's college in London have been able to genetically modify an onion so that it can make a human cry for almost 35 years. It's called an Evertonion.
  18. 2 points
    Ultimately it's his hard work to create the fourth goal which has won the 3 points for us today.
  19. 2 points
    I can't get to all the games at the moment and my mates nephew is using my ST when I can't go. So I had to watch on the telly today on tsn a Canadian station. The commentator said something like "there's plenty of tension on Merseyside about Liverpool's title challenge, but it's not from the red half, it's from the blue half". It just shows how mental they are when commentators are taking the piss out of them.
  20. 2 points
    We will score four Edit: there's the first!
  21. 2 points
    Just watched Tina Weymouth on Bass from BBC4 last night. Inevitably boss. Loved learning about Bernard Edwards’ unique playing style, Robbie Shakespeare playing Slave To The Rhythm on one string and Hooky ripping off Ennio Morricone for Blue Monday. Also, Bootsy laughing at James Brown appropriating everyone else’s ideas as his own and the old session dude who wrote the bass line on Walk On The Wildside clearly a little hurt that he never got a credit but far too nice to say so. Loads of great stuff here. Check it out.
  22. 2 points
  23. 2 points
    Easier to post this. He was an Evertonian and took me to my first match at Goodison 4 - 4 against Newcastle, just didn't seem right to me. Didn't really know my Mums Dad. I know he used to drive trains.
  24. 2 points
    Both died a long time ago. My maternal grandfather survived a political assassination attempt after the WWII in ex-Yu when grandma had to take one for the team. The assassin fired through the bedroom window but had wrong information about the sleeping arrangement so he hit grandma instead. Fortunately she survived, full of shot. They had two elderly spinsters living with them in the cottage and one of them, while they all panicked, on being yelled at "do something, she is bleeding", grabbed some kind of a washbowl and put it under the bed so the floor wouldn't get dirty. They lived like characters in some dark comedy.
  25. 2 points
    Think I’ve posted this before. My Grampher was a local labour councillor for decades and he and my Nan were invited to a garden party at Buckingham Palace. As a proud Cork man and a republican he initially refused to go until my Nan made him. My Nan and Grampher are in line to meet the queen, just as she’s approaching my Nan looks to her side to find my Grampher had done a runner. As she’s meeting the queen she can see my Grampher stealing cuttings from one of the queens rose bushes.



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