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*Shakes head* Everton again.

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1 hour ago, Einch said:

Northcroft in the Times today has laid out a  few home truths. Less than flattering about Silva. 

 

No doubt he will be a red shite cunt for stating what everyone else sees. 

 

On an unusually balmy March evening in 2002, David Moyes drove to Goodison Park for his unveiling as Everton manager. The kids were out playing in the parks and streets and so many were wearing Everton shirts.

 

At his press conference, unrehearsed, Moyes said his feeling was of joining a “people’s football club” and a nickname, “The People’s Club”, was born. Once, identity at Everton sprang as organically as that. Now you look at them: almost a nothing club in terms of strong figureheads, philosophy and style of play. What are Everton in 2019? Who leads them? What is their football supposed to look like? The people are still behind them, but what do they represent? The Moyes Everton were the team with the history but not the resources to match the big boys. So they turned that into a cause: an upcoming, firebrand manager marshalling players with the underdog spirit, all feeding off the hard footballing intensity of that deep-rooted fanbase. No side enjoyed a visit to Goodison. Everton were gnarly, robust and organised yet — from Wayne Rooney to Mikel Arteta to Leighton Baines to John Stones — sprinkled with talent, dogs of war who could play.

 

One problem these days is that so many other teams outside the Big Six (think Wolves, Burnley, Crystal Palace or Bournemouth at their best) have adopted similar traits that even if Everton could return to what once defined them, they would no longer be unique. Another is the existential crisis caused by the gap between their pretensions and realities on the pitch.

 

Their owner, Farhad Moshiri, cannot be faulted for ambition and backing, having started on a new £500m stadium and spent £470m on players — more than anyone bar the Manchester clubs and Chelsea — since assuming control in 2016. His target this season is Europe. Instead, for a second campaign in three, relegation is the worry.

 The 

The European data site transfermarkt.com puts together tables trying to quantify value for money. One shows where a club ranks when comparing its expenditure to its Premier League position, another when placing that league position against the market value of its squad. Everton are bottom of both. Then there is Marco Silva’s record — the worst points per game of any Everton manager since Walter Smith. Then, the alarming fine details, such as Everton failing to bounce back and win in the 24 league games under Silva in which they have fallen behind. Or like Everton collecting the lowest percentage of away points of any team in England’s top four tiers. Or, before yesterday, conceding the most set-piece goals in the top flight (26) since Silva’s arrival in summer 2018.

 

All this points to a side with a marshmallow centre and the inability of Silva and Moshiri’s recruiters, led by director of football Marcel Brands, to invest in character when they are lavishing millions on players. Silva’s established deficiencies have followed him to Merseyside (his set-piece and away records were also poor at Watford and Hull) while he is struggling to impose his known strengths. Those are — according to three footballers who have worked with him — one-to-one man-management, tactical detail and an eye for attacking combinations, but at Everton he seems uncertain which players to trust and which to blend together. In 48 league games he has used as many as 28 players, yet only six (Jordan Pickford, Seamus Coleman, Lucas Digne, Michael Keane, Richarlison and Gylfi Sigurdsson) have started more than two matches in three.

Having seemingly found a winning combination when he saved his job last season with a late run that included victories over Chelsea, Arsenal and Manchester United, Silva changed it and began 2019-20 prioritising experience and possession but has recently sidelined older players, such as Sigurdsson, Coleman and Fabian Delph, to inject more aggression, youth and pace. Luck has undoubtedly been lousy — witness Jean-Philippe Gbamin’s injury, or Brighton’s risible VAR penalty in last weekend’s 3-2 defeat — and Silva is thought to have been dismayed by a transfer summer where the pivotal Idrissa Gueye departed and no additional centre-back arrived, despite losing Kurt Zouma, and where yet another window passed without Romelu Lukaku being adequately replaced.

 

After so much previous spending, Financial Fair Play is influencing a retrenchment and Brands favours buying younger talent whereas Silva wanted proven players, leading to disconnect. At the rear, where ebbing pace has blunted Coleman, England criticism appears to have punctured Keane, and Pickford seems in regression. Problems mount. Yerry Mina, having suffered significant injury absences in each of his last three seasons, is now nursing knee trouble.

It is a squad put together by five managers, two directors of football, two owners (Bill Kenwright and Moshiri) and — they say — with a fair input from agents. In terms of identity, Coleman is the last regular carrying the torch from the Moyes days. Beyond him and Baines, the longest-serving player — and this says much — is Oumar Niasse. Losing to Spurs would leave Everton dangerously placed and looming is a brutal December, which begins with away games v Leicester and Liverpool three days apart before continuing via meetings with Chelsea, United and Arsenal. Silva’s position is understood to be precarious. But the spotlight might soon turn on Brands, who was pilloried by former Holland star Wim Kieft last week. Questioning his compatriot’s recruitment at Everton and PSV Eindhoven, Kieft wrote: “Brands is better looking in the mirror instead of covering up his mistakes and blaming others.”

 

Brands, in fairness, has played an important role in bringing stability to Everton’s football operation after Moshiri’s impulsive first two years of ownership. But you go back to a confused identity and leadership. Brands is by no means the only significant influence over buying and selling. Indeed this once slim club, after quick growth thanks to Moshiri’s money, now feels top-heavy: Everton’s website lists 35 department heads. That early spring sunshine of 17 years ago belongs to a different era but the point of identity is having firm ground to cling to when the winds of change blow. Everton are into the Carabao Cup last eight so that’s something. But the Premier League will punish a nothing club.

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1 hour ago, Anubis said:

I have a feeling that for some logical reason Diego Simeone doesn’t want to do it either. 
 

 

Yakinblue

Yakinblue

Player Valuation: £2.5m
Lose to spurs and it's 6 points off seventh, and 2 points off the drop zone.Surely to god the board, are looking at potential replacements.Losing to an out of form Spurs side, will be the straw that breaks the camels back imo.
We could go to Madrid right now and Diego Simeone on board for Christmas but for some unlogical reason we don't want to do it.

I know it's crazy but just slap the money on the table,  money talks in this game hahahahaha 

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1 hour ago, Anubis said:
 

On an unusually balmy March evening in 2002, David Moyes drove to Goodison Park for his unveiling as Everton manager. The kids were out playing in the parks and streets and so many were wearing Everton shirts.

 

At his press conference, unrehearsed, Moyes said his feeling was of joining a “people’s football club” and a nickname, “The People’s Club”, was born. Once, identity at Everton sprang as organically as that. Now you look at them: almost a nothing club in terms of strong figureheads, philosophy and style of play. What are Everton in 2019? Who leads them? What is their football supposed to look like? The people are still behind them, but what do they represent? The Moyes Everton were the team with the history but not the resources to match the big boys. So they turned that into a cause: an upcoming, firebrand manager marshalling players with the underdog spirit, all feeding off the hard footballing intensity of that deep-rooted fanbase. No side enjoyed a visit to Goodison. Everton were gnarly, robust and organised yet — from Wayne Rooney to Mikel Arteta to Leighton Baines to John Stones — sprinkled with talent, dogs of war who could play.

 

One problem these days is that so many other teams outside the Big Six (think Wolves, Burnley, Crystal Palace or Bournemouth at their best) have adopted similar traits that even if Everton could return to what once defined them, they would no longer be unique. Another is the existential crisis caused by the gap between their pretensions and realities on the pitch.

 

Their owner, Farhad Moshiri, cannot be faulted for ambition and backing, having started on a new £500m stadium and spent £470m on players — more than anyone bar the Manchester clubs and Chelsea — since assuming control in 2016. His target this season is Europe. Instead, for a second campaign in three, relegation is the worry.

 The 

The European data site transfermarkt.com puts together tables trying to quantify value for money. One shows where a club ranks when comparing its expenditure to its Premier League position, another when placing that league position against the market value of its squad. Everton are bottom of both. Then there is Marco Silva’s record — the worst points per game of any Everton manager since Walter Smith. Then, the alarming fine details, such as Everton failing to bounce back and win in the 24 league games under Silva in which they have fallen behind. Or like Everton collecting the lowest percentage of away points of any team in England’s top four tiers. Or, before yesterday, conceding the most set-piece goals in the top flight (26) since Silva’s arrival in summer 2018.

 

All this points to a side with a marshmallow centre and the inability of Silva and Moshiri’s recruiters, led by director of football Marcel Brands, to invest in character when they are lavishing millions on players. Silva’s established deficiencies have followed him to Merseyside (his set-piece and away records were also poor at Watford and Hull) while he is struggling to impose his known strengths. Those are — according to three footballers who have worked with him — one-to-one man-management, tactical detail and an eye for attacking combinations, but at Everton he seems uncertain which players to trust and which to blend together. In 48 league games he has used as many as 28 players, yet only six (Jordan Pickford, Seamus Coleman, Lucas Digne, Michael Keane, Richarlison and Gylfi Sigurdsson) have started more than two matches in three.

Having seemingly found a winning combination when he saved his job last season with a late run that included victories over Chelsea, Arsenal and Manchester United, Silva changed it and began 2019-20 prioritising experience and possession but has recently sidelined older players, such as Sigurdsson, Coleman and Fabian Delph, to inject more aggression, youth and pace. Luck has undoubtedly been lousy — witness Jean-Philippe Gbamin’s injury, or Brighton’s risible VAR penalty in last weekend’s 3-2 defeat — and Silva is thought to have been dismayed by a transfer summer where the pivotal Idrissa Gueye departed and no additional centre-back arrived, despite losing Kurt Zouma, and where yet another window passed without Romelu Lukaku being adequately replaced.

 

After so much previous spending, Financial Fair Play is influencing a retrenchment and Brands favours buying younger talent whereas Silva wanted proven players, leading to disconnect. At the rear, where ebbing pace has blunted Coleman, England criticism appears to have punctured Keane, and Pickford seems in regression. Problems mount. Yerry Mina, having suffered significant injury absences in each of his last three seasons, is now nursing knee trouble.

It is a squad put together by five managers, two directors of football, two owners (Bill Kenwright and Moshiri) and — they say — with a fair input from agents. In terms of identity, Coleman is the last regular carrying the torch from the Moyes days. Beyond him and Baines, the longest-serving player — and this says much — is Oumar Niasse. Losing to Spurs would leave Everton dangerously placed and looming is a brutal December, which begins with away games v Leicester and Liverpool three days apart before continuing via meetings with Chelsea, United and Arsenal. Silva’s position is understood to be precarious. But the spotlight might soon turn on Brands, who was pilloried by former Holland star Wim Kieft last week. Questioning his compatriot’s recruitment at Everton and PSV Eindhoven, Kieft wrote: “Brands is better looking in the mirror instead of covering up his mistakes and blaming others.”

 

Brands, in fairness, has played an important role in bringing stability to Everton’s football operation after Moshiri’s impulsive first two years of ownership. But you go back to a confused identity and leadership. Brands is by no means the only significant influence over buying and selling. Indeed this once slim club, after quick growth thanks to Moshiri’s money, now feels top-heavy: Everton’s website lists 35 department heads. That early spring sunshine of 17 years ago belongs to a different era but the point of identity is having firm ground to cling to when the winds of change blow. Everton are into the Carabao Cup last eight so that’s something. But the Premier League will punish a nothing club.

That will not go down well at woodison. I hope for his sake northcroft isn't going to the game today. 

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2 hours ago, Anubis said:
 

On an unusually balmy March evening in 2002, David Moyes drove to Goodison Park for his unveiling as Everton manager. The kids were out playing in the parks and streets and so many were wearing Everton shirts.

 

At his press conference, unrehearsed, Moyes said his feeling was of joining a “people’s football club” and a nickname, “The People’s Club”, was born. Once, identity at Everton sprang as organically as that. Now you look at them: almost a nothing club in terms of strong figureheads, philosophy and style of play. What are Everton in 2019? Who leads them? What is their football supposed to look like? The people are still behind them, but what do they represent? The Moyes Everton were the team with the history but not the resources to match the big boys. So they turned that into a cause: an upcoming, firebrand manager marshalling players with the underdog spirit, all feeding off the hard footballing intensity of that deep-rooted fanbase. No side enjoyed a visit to Goodison. Everton were gnarly, robust and organised yet — from Wayne Rooney to Mikel Arteta to Leighton Baines to John Stones — sprinkled with talent, dogs of war who could play.

 

One problem these days is that so many other teams outside the Big Six (think Wolves, Burnley, Crystal Palace or Bournemouth at their best) have adopted similar traits that even if Everton could return to what once defined them, they would no longer be unique. Another is the existential crisis caused by the gap between their pretensions and realities on the pitch.

 

Their owner, Farhad Moshiri, cannot be faulted for ambition and backing, having started on a new £500m stadium and spent £470m on players — more than anyone bar the Manchester clubs and Chelsea — since assuming control in 2016. His target this season is Europe. Instead, for a second campaign in three, relegation is the worry.

 The 

The European data site transfermarkt.com puts together tables trying to quantify value for money. One shows where a club ranks when comparing its expenditure to its Premier League position, another when placing that league position against the market value of its squad. Everton are bottom of both. Then there is Marco Silva’s record — the worst points per game of any Everton manager since Walter Smith. Then, the alarming fine details, such as Everton failing to bounce back and win in the 24 league games under Silva in which they have fallen behind. Or like Everton collecting the lowest percentage of away points of any team in England’s top four tiers. Or, before yesterday, conceding the most set-piece goals in the top flight (26) since Silva’s arrival in summer 2018.

 

All this points to a side with a marshmallow centre and the inability of Silva and Moshiri’s recruiters, led by director of football Marcel Brands, to invest in character when they are lavishing millions on players. Silva’s established deficiencies have followed him to Merseyside (his set-piece and away records were also poor at Watford and Hull) while he is struggling to impose his known strengths. Those are — according to three footballers who have worked with him — one-to-one man-management, tactical detail and an eye for attacking combinations, but at Everton he seems uncertain which players to trust and which to blend together. In 48 league games he has used as many as 28 players, yet only six (Jordan Pickford, Seamus Coleman, Lucas Digne, Michael Keane, Richarlison and Gylfi Sigurdsson) have started more than two matches in three.

Having seemingly found a winning combination when he saved his job last season with a late run that included victories over Chelsea, Arsenal and Manchester United, Silva changed it and began 2019-20 prioritising experience and possession but has recently sidelined older players, such as Sigurdsson, Coleman and Fabian Delph, to inject more aggression, youth and pace. Luck has undoubtedly been lousy — witness Jean-Philippe Gbamin’s injury, or Brighton’s risible VAR penalty in last weekend’s 3-2 defeat — and Silva is thought to have been dismayed by a transfer summer where the pivotal Idrissa Gueye departed and no additional centre-back arrived, despite losing Kurt Zouma, and where yet another window passed without Romelu Lukaku being adequately replaced.

 

After so much previous spending, Financial Fair Play is influencing a retrenchment and Brands favours buying younger talent whereas Silva wanted proven players, leading to disconnect. At the rear, where ebbing pace has blunted Coleman, England criticism appears to have punctured Keane, and Pickford seems in regression. Problems mount. Yerry Mina, having suffered significant injury absences in each of his last three seasons, is now nursing knee trouble.

It is a squad put together by five managers, two directors of football, two owners (Bill Kenwright and Moshiri) and — they say — with a fair input from agents. In terms of identity, Coleman is the last regular carrying the torch from the Moyes days. Beyond him and Baines, the longest-serving player — and this says much — is Oumar Niasse. Losing to Spurs would leave Everton dangerously placed and looming is a brutal December, which begins with away games v Leicester and Liverpool three days apart before continuing via meetings with Chelsea, United and Arsenal. Silva’s position is understood to be precarious. But the spotlight might soon turn on Brands, who was pilloried by former Holland star Wim Kieft last week. Questioning his compatriot’s recruitment at Everton and PSV Eindhoven, Kieft wrote: “Brands is better looking in the mirror instead of covering up his mistakes and blaming others.”

 

Brands, in fairness, has played an important role in bringing stability to Everton’s football operation after Moshiri’s impulsive first two years of ownership. But you go back to a confused identity and leadership. Brands is by no means the only significant influence over buying and selling. Indeed this once slim club, after quick growth thanks to Moshiri’s money, now feels top-heavy: Everton’s website lists 35 department heads. That early spring sunshine of 17 years ago belongs to a different era but the point of identity is having firm ground to cling to when the winds of change blow. Everton are into the Carabao Cup last eight so that’s something. But the Premier League will punish a nothing club.

 

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“.....Everton are into the Carabao Cup last eight so that’s something. But the Premier League will punish a nothing club.” 


“Not my words Marco, the words of the Sunday Times!”

 

CD56C112-3E7D-4432-9453-DE4339B193B3.jpeg

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49 minutes ago, Toxteth O'Grady said:

Wasn't it only a couple of months ago that Keane was definitely the best Centre Half on Merseyside? 


Even the greats need an occasional rest.

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Can see them getting a win here to be fair. Spurs are fucking shite. If Richardson had half a brain they would be ahead. 

 

Tom Davies has turned these around a bit in the last few weeks. I called it ages ago and got laughed at. Have that Pidge you country bumpkin. 

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