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Don't worry, this isn't a "He's past it thread". The guy is still the best defender we have.

 

However he's got to remember that defending isn't his only responsibility. He's also partly responsible for us keeping hold of the ball and he failed massively in the part of the game today. Far too many hopeful balls. If there is no option ahead of you, then go back to the keeper and start again.

 

I know he's never going to be Beckenbauer but he just needs to make sure he doesn't cost us possession too much in these games.

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Agree, him a few others were disappointing in their distribution today. I think Carragher have also been influenced by Kenny. Against Chelsea I think he kept it more on the deck than before. But he also saved us today on a couple of occasions, just as he did last week. Carragher and Agger are clearly our best option at the back. Kyrgiakos as backup if you ask me, in my opinion Skrtel simply isn't premiership quality.

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I think it is just part of his dna. At one point late in the game you could hear him shrieking "AWAY, AWAY" as Lucas and Kelly played it out of a tight spot in our right corner.

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I like the way he stops still and stands there winding up his leg prepping for the punt.

 

The one legged hokey cokey Carra shuffle i like to call it.

 

How about the one-legged pivot when passing back to Pepe? Always followed by a crab-like shuffle backwards and out wide, while at the same time shouting at whichever one of our full-backs is on the opposite side to get in position to receive the ball, and also pointing to one of our central midfielders to shift back and cover the middle of defence. Once the ball is cleared upfield, he will then clear his nose, take a deep breath and dredge up a docker's oyster, before commencing with more pointing and shouting.

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How about the one-legged pivot when passing back to Pepe? Always followed by a crab-like shuffle backwards and out wide, while at the same time shouting at whichever one of our full-backs is on the opposite side to get in position to receive the ball, .

 

Made me chuckle, it is funny that backwards run to the touchline

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Made me chuckle, it is funny that backwards run to the touchline

 

Not as funny as him finally deigning to pass to Lucas, who of course then seems to make a point of getting put under pressure and almost losing the ball. Repeatedly.

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Heh... We were without Meireles(for half the game), Gerrard, and Agger from our first team. Of course we looked a bit clueless at times, that's a lot of quality passers of the football out of the squad.

 

Add in Kuyt's nightmare of a performance.

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Once the ball is cleared upfield, he will then clear his nose, take a deep breath and dredge up a docker's oyster, before commencing with more pointing and shouting.

 

:lol: Great Liverpool expressions like this should be listed and not forgotten ! Also known as a snarlie I believe or would you say there is a subtle difference?!

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How about the one-legged pivot when passing back to Pepe? Always followed by a crab-like shuffle backwards and out wide, while at the same time shouting at whichever one of our full-backs is on the opposite side to get in position to receive the ball, and also pointing to one of our central midfielders to shift back and cover the middle of defence. Once the ball is cleared upfield, he will then clear his nose, take a deep breath and dredge up a docker's oyster, before commencing with more pointing and shouting.

 

 

He's one of the best defenders to ever play for Liverpool.

 

Show some respect.

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He's one of the best defenders to ever play for Liverpool.

 

Show some respect.

 

Fuck off you mong. I wasn't taking the piss. This is something he's actually does, and I'm not slagging him off for it.

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We have a big problem when Agger's not in the team.

 

None of Carra, Skrtel and Kyrgiakos are comfortable bringing the ball out of defense. Lucas is usually the one dropping deep to show for it, but if there's a man on him (as Anelka was in the first half vs. Chelsea), Skrtel or Carra will tend to hit the ball long rather than taking it out of defense. As we aren't currently playing with a target man, we usually cede possession using this tactic.

 

Bit different when Daniel plays because he isn't afraid of venturing into the opponents half, which means that just putting a man on Lucas doesn't necessarily work as Agger is comfortable bringing the ball forward himself, and we still have a route out without resorting to smashing it up in the air.

 

It's no slight on Carra or Skrtel as they simply aren't that sort of player, but it makes us fucking easy to play against when we are trying to bring the ball out without a technical centre back.

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Guest ShoePiss

Pulled this from rawk, great interview.

 

 

The invisible demon driving on a Liverpool hero

 

 

 

Matthew Syed Updated 44 minutes ago

 

Jamie Carragher’s need to be Mr Perfect may not sit well at home at times, but he wouldn’t have it any other way, as Matthew Syed hears

 

It is the Monday after Liverpool’s victory against Bolton Wanderers last month. The Anfield club are third in the Barclays Premier League, riding high after two straight wins, and Jamie Carragher has an additional reason to be cheerful. He has just checked into the refurbished Savoy Hotel in London, a special treat for his wife Nicola, to celebrate the couple’s wedding anniversary.

 

But here’s the thing: Carragher is anxious. He cannot settle. A scene is being played out in his mind, over and over. A small mistake in the 90th minute of the match, which had no bearing on the result, is nagging away at him — and he cannot let it go. It is not only taking the edge off the day, it threatens to overshadow the international break.

 

“You could call it obsessive, but I have always agonised over my errors,” the 33-year-old says, sipping a glass of water in the lobby of the Savoy. “It’s strange, isn’t it? I have come down to London with my missus, have gone to watch a great show, Ghost, but I honestly feel that I don’t deserve it. My face hit the floor when the slip-up happened — and my wife immediately knew that our break wouldn’t be the same.

 

“I have been like that ever since I was a schoolboy. I remember playing a youth match at Anfield and, even though we won, I couldn’t celebrate because my performance was below-par. I have always wanted to play to absolute best, error-free. It is like an invisible demon, driving me to train harder, to go the extra mile, in practice sessions and in matches. That is just the way I am.”

 

Jonny Wilkinson has spoken of perfectionism as a blessing and curse, as have Sir Steve Redgrave and Martina Navratilova. They would doubtless relate to Carragher and his lifelong battle to reconcile his impossibly high standards with his own fallibility.

 

“Young players at the club say, ‘I have to be like Carra in training’ because they can see that I put in a shift in every session,” he says. “But why should I rest on my laurels just because I have been in the top flight for so long?

 

“I am always looking to up my game because I feel that I still have something to prove. Even today some Liverpool fans are asking questions about my age and how long I will last. The club has just signed a new centre back [sebastián Coates], who will be knocking at the door. There is no room for complacency.”

 

There can be few more honest or eloquent footballers than Carragher. As the interview progresses, he discusses football in all its intricacy — tactics, statistics, training methods — as well as the players he has played with and against. But it is when probing his psyche, the mechanisms that make him tick, that he is at his most compelling.

 

When I approach the question of why he retired from international football he hardly breaks stride. “Being a squad player is not enough,” he says. “I live for the fight. That is why I got tired of going to World Cups and qualifying games without being a part of the team.

 

“I did an interview the other day because it was the ten-year anniversary of the 5-1 defeat of Germany and the journalist asked if it was the greatest game I had ever played for England. But how could it be when I only played for ten minutes as a sub? I am not going to take credit for that.”

 

He also pinpoints another reason for his ambivalence. “It is a funny thing, but playing for Liverpool has always meant more to me than playing for England,” he says. “That does not mean I am unpatriotic or do not care about my country. It just means that, when it comes to football, my pride in Liverpool exceeds my pride in England. It is not a conscious preference, but it does say a lot about me as a person.

 

“I was brought up in Bootle and my mum still lives in the same house. This is where I learnt to play football and learnt about life. The connection with my roots is not about location, it is about culture and values and millions of other things that are difficult to define. People sometimes wonder why I am quite a modest person, but the reason is simple. If you are flash and arrogant in Liverpool, you are quickly brought back down to earth. That is the way it is.”

 

Carragher’s umbilical link with Liverpool makes it unthinkable that he would leave the club he joined as a schoolboy (he had initially supported Everton when growing up before slowly and painfully switching allegiance). “My contract is up for renewal in two years, but I would not want to play for any other club,” he says. “Life is not just about money. There are other things, important things, that have a different kind of value. Anyone from Liverpool could tell you that.”

 

Although Carragher is fixated upon football, it would be unfair to characterise him as a one-dimensional person. Quite the reverse. When we discuss politics he offers a nuanced left-of-centre analysis of social problems (the conversation takes place three weeks after the riots). When we talk about family — he has two young children — he talks passionately about parenthood. To put it simply, he is absorbing company.

 

I ask Carragher what his plans are for when he does retire from football. “I sometimes fantasise about leaving the game altogether, just to get away from my obsession, but to be honest I love the game too much,” he says. “Management would be a great option, or possibly the media. I read things in the papers or see things on TV and the analysis is sometimes not strong enough.

 

“An article will say that a certain player or team is underperforming, but there is not enough depth to the argument. They don’t ask why a player is below-par or don’t analyse where a team is going wrong, tactically or psychologically. That is where an ex-player with a bit of nous could add something.”

 

One of the most striking things about Carragher is that, although he has played at the highest level for many years, his thirst to learn is insatiable. Indeed, this interview came about because Carragher had read my book Bounce, called The Times to obtain my number and phoned out of the blue to discuss its ideas. Needless to say, the conversation was long and probing.

 

“To understand high-level performance, it is no good just assuming that your own personal journey is the last word on the matter,” he says. “You need to look at the science, read about the experiences of other people and look at the statistics. I try to read as much as possible to get a stronger handle on the science of performance. It doesn’t just help you as a player, it also helps you as a leader in the dressing room.”

 

Liverpool’s performances have improved considerably since Kenny Dalglish took over as manager in January, something that has not merely had an impact upon Carragher’s hopes of finally claiming an elusive Premier League winner’s medal, but also his sense of self-worth.

 

“The team has definitely grown in confidence and that makes life, and not just football, a lot brighter,” he says. “When things are going badly, as they sometimes have at Liverpool in recent years, you just want to hide behind corners. You don’t want to see the fans because you know how important it is to them. You almost feel responsible for their happiness.

 

“People look to players like me and Stevie [Gerrard] to sort any problems out. I love the responsibility, and I would never hide from it, but it can sometimes weigh heavily.”

 

As Carragher gets up to leave with a firm handshake, it suddenly occurs to me of whom he reminds me. It is a grandiose comparison, perhaps, but, given his authenticity, passion, depth and, above all, his defining belief in football as an extension of community, it is a comparison that Liverpool fans would instantly recognise. “Carra” is a latter-day Shankly. There is no greater compliment.

 

Highs and lows of a legend

 

A boyhood Evertonian, Jamie Carragher was part of Liverpool’s 1996 FA Youth Cup-winning side along with Michael Owen — Rio Ferdinand and Frank Lampard lined up against him for West Ham United.

 

• Scored on his league debut in a 3-0 win over Aston Villa the next year.

 

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/sport/football/clubs/liverpool/article3160316.ece

 

 

Club will make room when he hangs up boots

 

Analysis Tony Evans Updated 41 minutes ago

 

Of all the myths that surround Anfield, few have the evocative potency of the Boot Room. From the heyday of Bill Shankly until it was dismantled — metaphorically and physically — during the Graeme Souness era, the untidy cubbyhole assumed the status of a university of football. The messy storage room produced a flow of great Liverpool managers.

 

A new book on one of its graduates, Joe Fagan: Reluctant Champion by Andrew Fagan and Mark Platt, charts its accidental genesis. It was a place to store, and consume, beer. The football talk came as a happy consequence of conviviality.

 

Things have never been the same since Souness’s mid-1990s act of philosophical vandalism. The succession was broken and Roy Evans’s best efforts at restoration failed to recover the lost ethos.

 

Yet the last great product of the golden era has been reinstalled at Anfield and for Kenny Dalglish, legacy is as important as results — and that includes a new Boot Room. The 60-year-old wants to create a club that will function successfully ten years and more down the line.

 

Jamie Carragher has to be a candidate to move behind the scenes once his playing days are over. He is a student of football who would not be out of place debating with Bob Paisley, Fagan or Shankly himself.

 

He hoovers up football knowledge. Even at the height of his powers, Carragher asked an Italian football expert for videos of Franco Baresi. The boy from Bootle wanted to watch the great Italian growing old and see if there were any lessons that could be applied to his own career.

 

Two years ago, Carragher seemed to indicate where his ambitions lay. He was pictured alongside a portrait of Shankly, assuming an identical pose. With the club in turmoil and Rafael Benítez undermined from boardroom to dressing-room, the image sparked a clamour among some supporters. The phrase “The Scouse Guardiola” was bandied round. It was a dangerous exercise in wishful thinking, because — as Roy Hodgson proved — even the most experienced manager would have struggled to cope with such a dysfunctional club.

 

Yet the landscape has changed. Liverpool have stable owners and an iconic manager. Dalglish’s brains trust will not be fuelled by ale and suffer crates for seats. But there will be a place at Anfield where Carragher will have room to grow when he hangs up his boots.

 

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/sport/football/clubs/liverpool/article3160324.ece

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When I think of Carra, I warmly reflect on that great night in May 2005. His legs were cramping up and causing him agony, yet he still put in leg stretching game-saving tackles, and constantly drove other players on to give the same commitment.

 

When Dudek made the match winning save, Carra - despite the leg cramp, led the celebratory charge towards the heroic keeper - only he didn't stop when he got to him. He continued his sprint straight to the fans.

 

Ledge.

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When I think of Carra, I warmly reflect on that great night in May 2005. His legs were cramping up and causing him agony, yet he still put in leg stretching game-saving tackles, and constantly drove other players on to give the same commitment.

 

When Dudek made the match winning save, Carra - despite the leg cramp, led the celebratory charge towards the heroic keeper - only he didn't stop when he got to him. He continued his sprint straight to the fans.

 

Ledge.

 

 

Absolutely right.

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