Jump to content
Guest Ulysses Everett McGill

The Godfather

Recommended Posts

Been meaning to read the book for years, and only just got around to it.

 

I don't think there's a single aspect that isn't infinitely improved by Coppola. Puzo really does ramble, the dialogue is frequently hammy, the wandering side stories about sex are weird, and the big reveal of Barzini as the main antagonist is fluffed.

 

I didn't think I could hold the film in any higher esteem, but it now ranks as the best cinema adaptation in my mind, bar none.

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Babb'sBurstNad said:

Been meaning to read the book for years, and only just got around to it.

 

I don't think there's a single aspect that isn't infinitely improved by Coppola. Puzo really does ramble, the dialogue is frequently hammy, the wandering side stories about sex are weird, and the big reveal of Barzini as the main antagonist is fluffed.

 

I didn't think I could hold the film in any higher esteem, but it now ranks as the best cinema adaptation in my mind, bar none.

Never read it but that's an interesting critique.

 

I really enjoyed Nikos Kazantzakis' Last Temptation of Christ but Scorcese's filmed adaptation is even better. Sensational film which trims all the unnecessary flab away from the source material.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Carvalho Diablo said:

Never read it but that's an interesting critique.

 

I really enjoyed Nikos Kazantzakis' Last Temptation of Christ but Scorcese's filmed adaptation is even better. Sensational film which trims all the unnecessary flab away from the source material.

That's another one I'd like to read one day. Always find it fascinating reading the source material for adaptations, as they either eclipse the film (like The Name of the Rose), or give you a new found respect for the skill of the filmmakers. Trimming the fat, reordering scenes, finding that key moment that lends itself to a visual medium.

 

Still can't believe nobody said to Puzo "Maybe leave out the 15 page substory about that girl's cavernous vagina?"

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Babb'sBurstNad said:

That's another one I'd like to read one day. Always find it fascinating reading the source material for adaptations, as they either eclipse the film (like The Name of the Rose), or give you a new found respect for the skill of the filmmakers. Trimming the fat, reordering scenes, finding that key moment that lends itself to a visual medium.

 

Still can't believe nobody said to Puzo "Maybe leave out the 15 page substory about that girl's cavernous vagina?"

You ever read Alien? That is exactly the same as the film, and I mean exactly. Shot for shot, 100%

 

Probably my favourite horror film of all time but perhaps Ridley Scott doesn't deserve the credit after reading the book. On the other hand he deserves huge credit for recognising a great script and storyboard right within the pages of the novel and not deviating, at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Carvalho Diablo said:

You ever read Alien? That is exactly the same as the film, and I mean exactly. Shot for shot, 100%

 

Probably my favourite horror film of all time but perhaps Ridley Scott doesn't deserve the credit after reading the book. On the other hand he deserves huge credit for recognising a great script and storyboard right within the pages of the novel and not deviating, at all.

Never read it. Was the film based on it, or was it a novelization? I seem to recall with 2001 it was kind of a joint thing, book and film being made in conjunction, perhaps it was the same with Alien. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Babb'sBurstNad said:

Never read it. Was the film based on it, or was it a novelization? I seem to recall with 2001 it was kind of a joint thing, book and film being made in conjunction, perhaps it was the same with Alien. 

Ah, didn't realize that mate. It would explain much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/07/2021 at 14:19, Babb'sBurstNad said:

Been meaning to read the book for years, and only just got around to it.

 

I don't think there's a single aspect that isn't infinitely improved by Coppola. Puzo really does ramble, the dialogue is frequently hammy, the wandering side stories about sex are weird, and the big reveal of Barzini as the main antagonist is fluffed.

 

I didn't think I could hold the film in any higher esteem, but it now ranks as the best cinema adaptation in my mind, bar none.

 

As life changing as the movie is, I don't think they pull off the Barzini reveal, either.

 

He has like 3 lines over this great sprawling masterpiece with dozens of characters, before we find out what he's been up to. Not criticism, by the way, it was just really hard to pull off, as there a million other things going on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Kevin D said:

 

As life changing as the movie is, I don't think they pull off the Barzini reveal, either.

 

He has like 3 lines over this great sprawling masterpiece with dozens of characters, before we find out what he's been up to. Not criticism, by the way, it was just really hard to pull off, as there a million other things going on.

Fair point. I think it would've been hard to introduce him in any other way though. If he's a prominent figure of power, without having dealings with the Don, then his presence would've raised suspicion. A bit like the big name in an episode of Midsummer Murders.

 

If, however, he was more benevolent and friendly, then it would mirror - and take away from -Tessio's betrayal too much. The fact Barzini seems to emerge from the shadows underlines the unseen enemies who could be amassing against the family. It's also a nice bookend to the killing of Appolonia, which the movie leaves unanswered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I believe in America."

 

Aye, pal. That was your first mistake.

 

What could possibly go wrong believing in slave traders getting arsey over taxes?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 25/07/2021 at 11:39, Babb'sBurstNad said:

Fair point. I think it would've been hard to introduce him in any other way though. If he's a prominent figure of power, without having dealings with the Don, then his presence would've raised suspicion. A bit like the big name in an episode of Midsummer Murders.

 

If, however, he was more benevolent and friendly, then it would mirror - and take away from -Tessio's betrayal too much. The fact Barzini seems to emerge from the shadows underlines the unseen enemies who could be amassing against the family. It's also a nice bookend to the killing of Appolonia, which the movie leaves unanswered.

David Chase seems to be a fan of leaving some things unanswered(ie The Czechoslovakian Interior Decorator) and obviously picked this up from Coppolla.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After just watching Goodfellas, and before I start this most excellent of movies, I would like to quote Edward John Hearn:  "Oh, Hearn, you ain't putting that on - oh I am."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Kevin D said:

After just watching Goodfellas, and before I start this most excellent of movies, I would like to quote Edward John Hearn:  "Oh, Hearn, you ain't putting that on - oh I am."

Thinking about investing in this:

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×