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Section_31

The Space Thread

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Top idea for a thread Section. It puts arguments about transfers and forum behaviour in their place.

 

Cheers Neil.

 

 

Some othe favourites....

 

 

Mars pathfinder panorama

 

 

Europa fascinates me, the cracks are beleived to be cracks in ice with moving oceans beneath them generating heat, it also has a thin Oxygen atmosphere - the best hope for life in our solar system.

 

europa2_vgr_big.gif

Edited by Section_31

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Oh go on then some more...

 

Phobos, Martian moon

 

phobos.jpg

 

NGC1300 Spiral Barred Galaxy

 

ngc1300barredspiralgalaxy.jpg

 

LH95 Star forming region

 

LH95starformingregion.jpg

 

And now a real stunner, the Cats Eye Nebuale

 

catseyenebulae.jpg

 

Space Shuttle Atlantis docked with the ISS

 

atlantisdockedwithISS.jpg

 

M31 Andromeda Galaxy

 

andromedaM31.jpg

 

Insignificant aren't we?

 

Spacewalk

 

space_walk.jpg

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This is a Black Hole.

It's called a Black Hole cause it's full of colours.

 

414499aa.2.jpg

 

Here's another......just to illustrate the point.

 

169_BlackHole2.jpg

 

Interdimensiona; activity righ there.

 

Oh aye.

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Europa fascinates me, the cracks are beleived to be cracks in ice with moving oceans beneath them generating heat, it also has a thin Oxygen atmosphere - the best hope for life in our solar system.

 

All there worlds are yours to explore except Europa. Attempt no landing there.

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All there worlds are yours to explore except Europa. Attempt no landing there.

 

Quality 2010 quote!

 

Some more..

 

X-Ray image of The Sun

 

sun_big.gif

 

And again in ultraviolet

 

sun_euv19.gif

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People have a lot to say about space but, ultimately, it's just a large amount of nothing.

 

Oh I dunno, if you look at it from a different perspective, this particular part of space is where a greater than normal percentage of particles have grouped together due to gravity, whereas outer space, far from empty, is where particles are much farther apart... There's actual real 'space' between each atom in our bodies. Quite a cool and slightly scary way of looking at it, or it is as I see it in my head, shame I can't write for shit! Just you wait for the supra-universe toddler to pull the eraser across his exoscetch and it's wipeout baby!

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Anyone here into sci-fi books? Hard science fiction preferably - some amazing and far from outlandish ideas being formulated by authors in the field. The most famous has to be Arthur C Clarke's satellite prediction, but there's loads more amazing stuff out there. Kim Stanley Robinson's Red, Green, Blue Mars Trilogy is quite simply fucking outstanding - anyone with an interest in humanity escaping the clutches of earth has to read these.

 

To quote a review from Amazon:

"Red Mars" in particular, and the remainder of the trilogy as a whole are quite simply the best novels I have ever read. Ever. And I have read quite a few, s/f or otherwise. I recommend this to everybody, whether they like science-fiction or not.

 

and

 

The first volume of Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy is absolutely magnificent. This is a book for non-SciFi readers, as well as SciFi fans: the subject matter is wide-ranging and the book kept my interest throughout.

 

In some ways it struck me as a 21st Century version of what it must have been like for the early colonisers in the United States.

 

Greg Bear's Darwin's Radio is a quality story about the emergence of a new species of human - I've never had such a jolt of electricity run through me reading a book as when i got to the denouement (sp?) of that book. Forge of God, by the same author, about self replicating alien probes that bury into the earth, eventually resulting in its spectacular destruction, is a fucking outstanding read, and would make an amazing film.

 

Peter F Hamilton's Night's Dawn Trilogy is quite simply outstanding, if you've got it in you to get through 3000+ pages...

 

I wish I had found this trilogy in my twilight years because I could have died happy. I will never find another book(s) as absorbing as Night's Dawn Trilogy. As one of the other reviewers stated, it's not like reading a book it's like watching a film in your head. The way you are drawn into the book, the way you almost immediately start to have empathy for characters as they're introduced, the imagination of the author, the graphic literary style that makes it so easy to "see" the people/places/technology, the sheer scale - it all makes for a most enjoyable read.

 

That's actually a fairly crap review, but I've never read a book that's more visual mentally - I've got so many crystal clear mental images of hundreds of different scenes in the books - quality read.

 

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card is a classic - read it first when I was 15 and fucking loved it, has about 7 sequels too, mostly ace.

 

Twelve years before J.K.Rowling wrote about a boy called Harry Potter and his adventures at a school of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Orson Scott Card gave us the story of Ender Wiggins, a child prodigy who is torn away from his parents and entered into battle school, the often brutal training ground for Earth's next generation of military tacticians. Forget Quiddich, Slitherin and Griffindor, OSC gives us the Battle Room and teams Salamander and Dragon. Despite the comparison with Potter, this book is aimed at adults, though I am certain that it would have a massive appeal to teenagers.

 

This is classic sci-fi at its best: The battle room is brilliantly conceived; Ender is a character you just can't get enough of; and as for that surprise ending, well, you'll probably see it coming but it will be satisfying nonetheless.

 

There are so many more I could go on about - Sci Fi is a brilliant genre tainted by geekery-by-numbers but there are gems there that outstrip all but the best contemporary fiction, and some brilliant writers in their own right too.

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I love this shit. More space facts.

 

If we jumped on the fastest space rockety-type-thing we can currently build, it'll still take us 10,000 years to reach the edge of our own solar system.

 

De-tune your TV so it's got a snowy picture/hissing and about 5% of what you see and hear is back ground radiation from the start of the universe.

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HDF_extracts_showing_many_galaxies.jpg

 

That was one of my favourite pics when I did astronomy at Uni, it was in one of our books. It's almost unreal to think that you're looking back billions of years in time when you're looking at them as well.

 

'Earthrise' has to be the most amazing spectacle recorded by mankind, ever.

 

Except there really is no 'earthrise' on the Moon. This because of the simple fact our Moon doesn't rotate around its own axis like the Earth does, it only wobbles slightly back and forth. To get an 'earthrise' you have to fly by in a space craft.

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All there worlds are yours to explore except Europa. Attempt no landing there.

 

Quality 2010 quote!

 

Haha, as soon as I saw your post on the Downing thread I thought someone must have made that reference on here. I am such a geek.

 

2010 kicks ass, both the book and the film.

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On May 19th, 2005, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this stunning view as the Sun sank below the rim of Gusev crater on Mars. This Panoramic Camera mosaic was taken around 6:07 in the evening of the rover's 489th martian day, or sol. Spirit was commanded to stay awake briefly after sending that sol's data to the Mars Odyssey orbiter just before sunset.

 

mars15.jpg

 

Even higher in the Martian sky, the Earth and Moon hang in space, as seen from Mars.

 

mars17.jpg

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On May 19th, 2005, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this stunning view as the Sun sank below the rim of Gusev crater on Mars. This Panoramic Camera mosaic was taken around 6:07 in the evening of the rover's 489th martian day, or sol. Spirit was commanded to stay awake briefly after sending that sol's data to the Mars Odyssey orbiter just before sunset.

 

mars15.jpg

 

Even higher in the Martian sky, the Earth and Moon hang in space, as seen from Mars.

 

mars17.jpg

 

Its like I'm really on Tatooine.

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I have a book somecalled 'The Mars Mystery' which looks in detail at the Cydonia region of Mars as well as The Face and what happened to Mars. The images of Cydonia were fed into software designed to detect unusual geometric patterns The software concluded that the objects seen in Cydonia are too geometric too be natural formations.

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