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Section_31

The Space Thread

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Guest PaddyBerger15

Excellent work Soldier. This shit has always fascinated me, there are a few cracking programs about space and the Universe on one of those discovery channel type affairs...channel 529 on SLY I think it is, seems to be on most nights.

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Excellent work Soldier. This shit has always fascinated me, there are a few cracking programs about space and the Universe on one of those discovery channel type affairs...channel 529 on SLY I think it is, seems to be on most nights.

 

There are some stunning prints around from the Hubble Space telescope, If I had the room I'd have a load on my wall, nature at its most incredible.

 

Hubble composite image of the Helix Nebula, informally known as 'the eye of god'.

 

eye_of_god.jpg

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Guest PaddyBerger15

Thats an amazing picture that Eye of God...puts it all into perspective when you see something like that. We are small dots on a very small dot all running around like mad Mice trying to eek out an existence that means shit in the general scheme of things.

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What is interesting about space is this: They reckon that all of the universe is made up of three things; dark matter, dark energy and matter. I don't know the exact percentages, but dark energy is about 40%, dark matter is about 45% and matter is about 15%. The interesting thing about that, is that we don't know for sure that dark matter and dark energy exist.

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Anyone remember Space Night, on the german channel DFS I think it was. Used to (might still do..) get it on the old analogue satellite receivers. Used to be on from midnight to daft o'clock, and was just various space scenes, satellites view of Earth and so on all set to ambient music..

 

Man, I spent many a happy night ripped off my tits staring at that on the telly.

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530px-palebluedot.jpg

 

That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there - on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

 

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors, so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

 

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

 

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

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^^^ Awesome Phil, is that an infrared of the Orion Arm?

 

milky_way.jpg

 

 

 

EDIT - Fucking hell, did you know we're currently moving through a 'cloud'???

 

 

Localcloud.gif

 

 

The Local Interstellar Cloud, casually called the Local Fluff, is the interstellar cloud (roughly 30 light years across) through which our solar system is currently moving. The Solar System entered the Local Interstellar Cloud at some time between 44,000 and 150,000 years ago and is expected to remain within it for another 10 to 20,000 years. The cloud has a temperature of 6000° C, about the same temperature as the surface of the Sun. It is very thin, with 0.26 atoms per cubic centimeter; approximately one-fifth the density of the galactic interstellar medium and twice that of the gas in the Local Bubble. In comparison, Earth's atmosphere at STP has 2.7 × 1019 molecules per cubic centimeter.

 

The cloud is flowing outwards from the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, a stellar association that is a star-forming region.[1]

 

The cloud formed where the Local Bubble and the Loop I Bubble met. The Sun, with a few other local stars, is embedded in the Local Fluff. Notable nearby planetary systems include those of Alpha Centauri, Vega, Arcturus, and Fomalhaut.

 

The Local Interstellar Cloud's effects on Earth are effectively cancelled by the solar wind and the Sun's magnetic field.

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Horsehead Nebula

 

horsehead.jpg

 

Crab Nebula

 

crab_nebula_hubble.jpg

 

Eagle Nebula (I always think this looks a bit sinister)

 

Eagle%20Nebula%20M16.jpg

 

The Space Fairy, part of the Eagle Nebula

 

heic0506b_hst.jpg

 

 

Nebula-tastic mate.

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Isn't it right that as the expansion of the universe is accelerating exponentially, that this time now is the only time when astronomy is really possible? I'm sure I heard that on The Sky at Night.

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PIA08813.jpg?imgmax=512

 

The Victoria Crater, an impact crater at Meridiani Planum, near the equator of Mars. (apparently)

 

Nice picture this.

 

Have just set that as my desktop background at work. Aceness.

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Space facts

 

Saturn has such a low density that it would float if put in water!

 

The comet with the longest ever recorded tail is the Great Comet of 1843. Its tail stretched over 800 million kilometres! This is about the same distance the Earth is from Jupiter!

 

The Sun makes up 99.86% of the Solar System's mass! That means that all the planets put together (including Jupiter) as well as all the asteroids only make up about 0.14% of the Solar System's mass.

 

A Supernova explosion produces more energy in its first ten seconds than the Sun during the whole of its 10 billion year lifetime and that for a brief period, it creates more energy than the rest of a galaxy put together!!

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The edge of the universe, a Hubble 'ultra deep field' image showing the earliest galaxies at the edge of the universe - the starfields circled in green were the very first and are so far away that this is how they looked shortly after the univere itself came into existance.

 

This is where it all began.

 

Feeling small yet?

 

hudf.jpg

 

HDF_extracts_showing_many_galaxies.jpg

Edited by Section_31

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