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I'm after some recommendations and thought I'd throw a few into the mix:

 

"Altered Carbon" by Richard Morgan. I first read this in the summer and was blown away by it and am now on my second go. It's very gritty, noir-ish SF about this insanely hard bloke on the lam in a future where your consciousness can be stored, or transferred into new "sleeves" (bodies). Fucking ace.

 

I've read a few of the "Eagle" novels by Simon Scarrow set in Britain during Caesar's day. They're nowt special, but are an entertaining diversion.

 

"Wall & Piece" by Banksy was a Christmas book and it's absolutely addictive. Everyone who enters our bog seems to get lost for about half an hour because they start reading it. For those of you not in the know, he's a grafitti artist from Bristol who likes making anti-establishment artistic statements that look very nice on public walls.

 

Just about to start "The Algebraist" by Iain M. Banks. I've read all his others and not got round to this yet.

 

I'm also desperate for a new James Ellroy. Any other fans out there?

Edited by Paul

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I really wish I had the time to read leisurely. I just seem to spend all my time reading for uni work. Although I did manage to fit in Raymond Loewy's autobiography 'Never Leave Well Enough Alone' which is a fascinating read for anyone interested in design.

 

Recently saw Memoires of a Geisha and it is a far better book than a film, having read it a few years back I can say its a great read. I was also flicking through my housemates copy of 'Is It Just Me or Is Everything Shit?: The Encyclopedia of Modern Life' which is very funny for a bit of light reading.

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I really wish I had the time to read leisurely. I just seem to spend all my time reading for uni work. Although I did manage to fit in Raymond Loewy's autobiography 'Never Leave Well Enough Alone' which is a fascinating read for anyone interested in design.

 

Recently saw Memoires of a Geisha and it is a far better book than a film, having read it a few years back I can say its a great read. I was also flicking through my housemates copy of 'Is It Just Me or Is Everything Shit?: The Encyclopedia of Modern Life' which is very funny for a bit of light reading.

Is it very literary, or do the pages actually get turning? I can't stand literary fiction; it bores the arse off me.

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No its a damn good narrative, but it can be appreciated as just that without looking at its literary merits in any depth.

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Mario Puzo's The Godfather... The Lost Years.. Mark Winegardner

 

Also been getting into Lee Child's series of Jack Reacher novels.

 

 

I`ve got all the Jack Reacher novels and they`re the dogs bollocks.And Reacher is cool as Fuck.

State of fear by Michael Crichton is a very worthy read also as is `The Lincoln lawyer`by James Patterson and also his latest in the long running `Alex Cross` series of which the name escapes me.

`Fiddlers`by the legendary Ed Mcbain is the latest and continually excellant in the even longer running `87 precinct` saga.

I am currently reading `Forever Odd` by Dean Koontz which is the sequal to `Odd Thomas.

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I've read Iain Banks' Dead Air and thought it was a good read although I'm not quite sure what it was he wanted to say. Maybe you can enlighten me, Paul?

 

I have only the warmest recommendations of Alice Sebold's The Lovely Bones.

 

I found it very hard to put down. It was very emotional.

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I've read Iain Banks' Dead Air and thought it was a good read although I'm not quite sure what it was he wanted to say. Maybe you can enlighten me, Paul?

 

I have only the warmest recommendations of Alice Sebold's The Lovely Bones.

 

I found it very hard to put down. It was very emotional.

Is Dead Air the one set around 9/11? With the bloke who's a radio show host who gets involved with gansters? If so, I didn't see any deep significance; just a tall tale. I've read a lot of his non-genre stuff, but it's his SF as Iain M. Banks that I eally like.

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James Ellroy is a great writer and I've read most if not all of his books.I don't think he's written anything for a while and I remember some interview he gave when he said he was taking a break from writing.

If anyone hasn't read any of his stuff - try American Tabloid but stick with it for the first 50 pages while you get used to his unique style.After that you'll be hooked.

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James Ellroy is a great writer and I've read most if not all of his books.I don't think he's written anything for a while and I remember some interview he gave when he said he was taking a break from writing.

If anyone hasn't read any of his stuff - try American Tabloid but stick with it for the first 50 pages while you get used to his unique style.After that you'll be hooked.

Yeah, American Tabloid is genius. I came VERY close to giving up on it after a few pages - the writing pace is very much an acquired taste - but am extremely glad I didn't.

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I'm after some recommendations and thought I'd throw a few into the mix:

 

"Altered Carbon" by Richard Morgan. I first read this in the summer and was blown away by it and am now on my second go. It's very gritty, noir-ish SF about this insanely hard bloke on the lam in a future where your consciousness can be stored, or transferred into new "sleeves" (bodies). Fucking ace.

 

I've read a few of the "Eagle" novels by Simon Scarrow set in Britain during Caesar's day. They're nowt special, but are an entertaining diversion.

 

"Wall & Piece" by Banksy was a Christmas book and it's absolutely addictive. Everyone who enters our bog seems to get lost for about half an hour because they start reading it. For those of you not in the know, he's a grafitti artist from the smoke who likes making anti-establishment artistic statements that look very nice on public walls.

 

Just about to start "The Algebraist" by Iain M. Banks. I've read all his others and not got round to this yet.

 

I'm also desperate for a new James Ellroy. Any other fans out there?

 

I enjoyed "All quiet on the Orient Express" by Magnus Mills Amazon

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I've been reading a book on the Spanish Civil War. Good stuff it is too. Finished reading some of Ian Rankin's Rebus books as well. Liked the gritty, urban settings in those as well.

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I've been getting back into my Stephen King collection lately, with Rose Madder being the most recently finished, amongst The Stand, Green Mile, It and Graveyard Shift. I just like the texture of his writing. Atmospheric, colourful and ever so descriptive.

 

Jack Kerouacs "On the Road" is a good read in an "Amphetamine Psychosis" kind of fashion. Thats another one I intend on digging into soon...

 

Douglas Adams. Ahh. Who can possibly dislike the Dirk Gently books or the Hitchikers Guide collection. I just wish they had not have made that knob-arse film out of it. Talk about missing the point, the humour, the whole feckin' plot...

 

Whilst on the Sci-Fi/Fantasy thing, Robert Heinlein has never written a bad book, with Starship Troopers and Stranger in a Strange Land being particular favourites.

 

For sheer weirdness, Robert Anton Wilsons Illuminatus and Schrodingers Cat top the list.

 

 

Finally, a bit of light bedtime reading. The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, by William L Shirer, and The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes. Utterly fascinating.

 

 

Next week, I'll be reviewing music.. :D

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Am currently reading (on the non-fiction side) Soulsville USA: The story of stax records by Rob Bowman, which is fucking brilliant. Am also reading the Fourth Hand by John Irving, which whilst being no World According to Garp (one of my favourite novels ever - I defy anyone not to be moved by the way the death of their son - really not a spoiler by the way - is handled) is a pretty entertaining read.

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I've been getting back into my Stephen King collection lately, with Rose Madder being the most recently finished, amongst The Stand, Green Mile, It and Graveyard Shift. I just like the texture of his writing. Atmospheric, colourful and ever so descriptive.

 

I like him a lot too.Most people who haven't read his stuff assume it's just horror/gore fest but it's not like that at all.

Have you read any of his Dark Tower series?If not,try it - but it'll take you at least the next year or so to read all seven of them.Well worth it though.

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I'll go for an author instead of a book.

 

You being a man appreciative of language Paul, I would recommend Ernest Hemingway. He is a favourite of mine. Perhaps some of his short stories would be a place to start, although many of his novels are magnificent.

 

Or you could simply start with his first significant novel, The Sun Also Rises. A masterpiece in it's joy and sadness, lightheartedness and gravity.

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Last book I read Knife of Dreams, was from Robert Jordan, in his Wheel of the Time series. It is science fiction, ala LoTR, just much more thorough descriptions of the characters and the various subplots.

Be warned though, the series is 11 books so far, and still not finished...

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Have you read any David Peace, Paul? I'd give him a go if you like Ellroy - the same insanely cropped-down style and lack of sentiment, but his stuff's all set around the north in the late 70s and 80s.

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Colin Bateman is worth a read.

Perfume by Patrick Suskund is an amazing book. its very dark and imaginative and not like anything else I've read before or since.

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Reading is for gays.

 

 

 

Just kidding.

 

 

Last thing I read was "Motherless Brooklyn" by Jonathan Lethem. It's a detective novel in which the main character has tourette's. Bit of a gimmicky premise, but it's actually really good. Anyone who likes Noo Yock-based crime stuff should love it.

 

Another good one I read lately was "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley. Imagine if Nick Hornby was American and wrote like Charles Bukowski. Shit hot.

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