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"Wonderboy" by Henrik Langeland, a norwegian version of "Bonfire of the Vanities". Langeland is a big Wolfe-fan as well. It was OK.

 

Just finishing Wheel of Time (book 13) by Robert Jordan. I wish the man would just get this shit over and done with, as I want to know the ending already. I'm just a sucker for good fantasy, anybody have any pointers?

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"Wonderboy" by Henrik Langeland, a norwegian version of "Bonfire of the Vanities". Langeland is a big Wolfe-fan as well. It was OK.

 

Just finishing Wheel of Time (book 13) by Robert Jordan. I wish the man would just get this shit over and done with, as I want to know the ending already. I'm just a sucker for good fantasy, anybody have any pointers?

Could I lend book 12 and 13 from you? Especially since book 11 is the last one out.

click

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Shake Hands With The Devil by General Romeo Dallaire. Details the failed response to the Rwandan genocide. Agonizing read.

 

Rise and Fall of the Third Reich is a good shout, as are William Manchester's two volumes on Winston. Never got through Martin Gilbert's Churchill books.

 

Jon Krakeur books are always worth a second read. Especially Into the Wild aboot a upper-middle class American kid who sells dispouses American society and ends up in dead in the Alaskan wilderness. Into Thin Air was good as well, although at the crucial part of the Everest disaster he was suffering from hypoxic altitude sickness.

 

Not a big reader of fiction, but remember reading The Beach (whilst on a beach in the Dominican Republic) and thought it was good. Movie was shite beyond belief.

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Could I lend book 12 and 13 from you? Especially since book 11 is the last one out.

click

 

My apologies. Meant no.11.

 

You've read them? What do you think of the latest to come out?

 

I think Crossroads of Twilight is a fucking disgrace, did ANYTHING of note actually happen? It's like it was a stop-gap solution so he could it drag out to 13 books. Knife of Dreams is pretty decent so far, though it's getting pretty tiresome to read descriptions of the clothing and degree of bosom-revelation on every fucking woman who enters the story (and by god there are many).

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My apologies. Meant no.11.

 

You've read them? What do you think of the latest to come out?

It is defo way better than Crossroads of Twilight, not bad actually.

 

I think Crossroads of Twilight is a fucking disgrace, did ANYTHING of note actually happen? It's like it was a stop-gap solution so he could it drag out to 13 books. Knife of Dreams is pretty decent so far, though it's getting pretty tiresome to read descriptions of the clothing and degree of bosom-revelation on every fucking woman who enters the story (and by god there are many).

 

My biggest gripe by far with these books, are that the series has now gone on for over 10 years, get fucking typing and finish this series. I really like the series as a whole, but started reading them when the second book came out, and each time there goes about a year to the next one, so not to miss out on anything, I read the entire series so far in the couple of months leading up to the next book. Must have read the first book, The Eye of the World about 10 times....

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Apparently the new bainks book is dull beyond words.

 

The Occupation, Guy Walters

and The Leader Guy Walters again. Flew through those in a very short time, I think anyone who likes Fatherland will like the leader.

 

Currently on Black Dahlia, James Ellroy, seems very good so far.

 

It's been awhile since i read any sci fi, but Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card is fucking ace.

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Survivor by Chuck Pahluniuk. Just finished, didn't take long but really good, usual Chuck stuff - a mad story full of crazy fuckheads and enough plot holes to fill the Albert Hall. Seems written more as a vehicle for his social commentary, digs at organised religion and US decadence than as an excuse to spin a yarn. Not as good as Choke or Fight Club but well worth the $26 I shelled out for it. Read in tandem with Gangs by Tony Thompson which I bought at the airport cos I had $30 Aus left in me wallet. Investigative insight into some of Britain's most mentallist bastards you'd hope you're never unfortunate enough to come across (especially the Ruskies and Balkans). Seems there's some serious wedge to made from drugs tho, wish I was hard

:whatever:

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James Ellroy is a great writer and I've read most if not all of his books.I don't think he's written anything for a while and I remember some interview he gave when he said he was taking a break from writing.

If anyone hasn't read any of his stuff - try American Tabloid but stick with it for the first 50 pages while you get used to his unique style.After that you'll be hooked.

I was told to start with American Tabloid by a mate, but really struggled to get into it. I then switched to LA Confidential because I'd seen the film, and that gave me the breathing space to get my head around his terse, clipped, jargon-heavy style. I've since read everything and he's one of my favourite authors. Have you read The Cold Six Thousand, which is the sequel to American Tabloid? Needless to say, it's fucking ace.

 

On other books that are initially a struggle, Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh is amazing. However, unless you can hear the characters' voices in your head as you read, it's very hard to get into. The sequel, Porno, is even better, in my view.

 

Captain, I last read Hemmingway for my degree; The Old Man and The Sea being the one I remember the best. I like his very macho prose with short sentences that have their echoes in Ellroy's writing.

 

Finally, I have to give a very strong recommendation to the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman. Austensibly it's written for children, but you'd never know it except for the fact that the main characters are kids. However, it's the most original and imaginative story I've ever read, and his prose is phenomenal. Also it's full of literary allusions and ends up becoming an exploration of the evil of religion, ending with a finale that basically urges aetheism. Fucking mind-blowing - and a genuine page-turner.

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Black Dahlia is the first one i've read. Style seems quite easy to read. Elmore Leonard is good to.

I think it was his first and, as such, his style isn't fully developed in it.

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American Tabloid is an ace book, The Algebraist's not too bad, not as good as I expected though...

 

For anyone into their non-geeky Sci-Fi, may I recommend the Night's Dawn Trilogy and the Commonwealth Saga by Peter F. Hamilton - massive books, fucking brilliantly realised, mostly brilliant writing and some amazing, film-usurping set-pieces. Some tasty shagging in them too.

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Most recently I've been reading two non-fiction books about the history of football in Europe. I've probably mentioned them before but they are both excellent. "Morbo" by Phill Ball disects Spanish culture and rivalries and enlightens you on so many little details. Then there is a similar book about German football and culture which blows away many of the traditional German myths which is called "Tor!"

 

Fiction wise the most recent thing I read was The Dice Man which I thought was very good indeed and really gets you thinking about right and wrong and the values which society places upon these two words.

 

When it comes to reccomendations I would have to say that anyone who hasn't read Naomi Klein's "No Logo" really should and that anyone who hasn't ventured into the fictional worlds created by John King is missing out of some enjoyable and different writing. "The football factory", "England Away" and especially "Headhunters" were all very good reads.

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I think we mentioned it before but I've read Morbo as well. Well written book by Phil Ball, who is also a regular contributer to When Saturday Comes magazine. Liked the authors take on Sevilla/Betis rivalry especially in light of their great fans behaviour earlier this season.

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Any fans of comics or graphic novels out there? I've subscribed to 2000AD and Judge Dredd Megazine since I was a kid and I loved Crisis when that was around. I don't buy any other comics, but I do buy graphic novels - although it's only about two or three a year. Can anyone recommend any? I'm into Preacher, Alan Moore and New X-men.

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*Sighs*

I'm only adding to my geek factor now. The Frank Miller penned 'The Dark Knight Returns', 'Batman:Year One' and the Alan Moore written 'The Killing Joke' Batman graphic novels are genre defining.

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*Sighs*

I'm only adding to my geek factor now. The Frank Miller penned 'The Dark Knight Returns', 'Batman:Year One' and the Alan Moore written 'The Killing Joke' Batman graphic novels are genre defining.

The Dark Knight Returns, along with Watchmen, basically revived the comic industry. I haven't read Batman: Year One, though.

 

On Frank Miller, have you read any of the Sin City series? I loved the film, but haven't read any of the comics. Another big name in graphic novels is Neil Gaiman, but his stuff doesn't really appeal. It seems too up its own arse and the art work is indecipherable sometimes.

 

I've also read a few Constantine graphic novels, which are OK.

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The Dark Knight Returns, along with Watchmen, basically revived the comic industry. I haven't read Batman: Year One, though.

 

On Frank Miller, have you read any of the Sin City series? I loved the film, but haven't read any of the comics. Another big name in graphic novels is Neil Gaiman, but his stuff doesn't really appeal. It seems too up its own arse and the art work is indecipherable sometimes.

 

I've also read a few Constantine graphic novels, which are OK.

 

Batman: Year One is basically the blueprint/inspiration for Batman Begins.

 

I haven't read any of Sin City, so I couldn't comment. It has never had any appeal for me. Neil Gaiman is responsible for Sandman? Again, I don't know enough to pass informed judgement.

 

I wanted to read some more Hellblazer before the movie was released but never got the chance. The John Constantine character has real weight in print form but not the limp Keanu Reeves version(not that it's his fault).

 

I've also read some Marvel Max stuff. More precisely The Punisher Max. Seeing him let loose in a blaze of violence and profanity is a massive release. There was something to sterile about the regular version although I did enjoy it.

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Batman: Year One is basically the blueprint/inspiration for Batman Begins.

 

I haven't read any of Sin City, so I couldn't comment. It has never had any appeal for me. Neil Gaiman is responsible for Sandman? Again, I don't know enough to pass informed judgement.

 

I wanted to read some more Hellblazer before the movie was released but never got the chance. The John Constantine character has real weight in print form but not the limp Keanu Reeves version(not that it's his fault).

 

I've also read some Marvel Max stuff. More precisely The Punisher Max. Seeing him let loose in a blaze of violence and profanity is a massive release. There was something to sterile about the regular version although I did enjoy it.

Have you read Preacher by Garth Ennis? It's Tarantino to the power of ten in comic form. If you haven't, I guarantee you'll love it.

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Have you read Preacher by Garth Ennis? It's Tarantino to the power of ten in comic form. If you haven't, I guarantee you'll love it.

 

I have thought about it. The question is where to start? Recommendations would be welcome.

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I have thought about it. The question is where to start? Recommendations would be welcome.

Buy the first graphic novel (there are nine in total and then the story ends). You will not regret it.

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