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Dirk

YNWA

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This is such a sad story. It's from the offal. YNWA.

 

Liverpool Football Club are saddened to learn of the death of a fantatical supporter from Ireland who tragically passed away in the aftermath of the Reds' Champions League victory in Istanbul.

20 year old Patrick Robinson from Carlow is thought to have suffered a massive heart attack in the seconds following Jerzy Dudek's decisive penalty save from Andriy Shevchenko in the Ataturk Stadium.

 

Patrick was watching the game in a local pub and jumped for joy when his beloved Reds completed their tremendous comeback to win the dramatic penalty shoot-out.

 

But, tragically, he died soon after, just weeks before his 21st birthday.

 

His uncle, Michael Owens, wrote to Liverpoolfc.tv and said: "Patrick lived for Liverpool FC. He didn't get to see his favourite player Steven Gerrard lift the European Cup because he was sadly no longer of this world, but he saw the penalty shoot out and I know he died a happy and proud young man.

 

"Myself and my family would like to thank Steven Gerrard and everyone connected with LFC in the past and present for giving Patrick so many great memories."

 

Patrick's mother Denise said: "He was a beautiful child. He was really happy and he was so popular. He was very lively and he loved sport.

 

"He was fanatical about Liverpool and he has been since he was four years of age. He never missed a kit and every year he bought the home and away kits."

 

Everybody at Liverpool Football Club would like to extend their deepest sympathies to all the family and friends of Patrick at this extremely difficult time.

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I can see a case being made for singing YNWA when it's a tribute regarding one of our players or key figures, and it's at Anfield or possibly at a neutral venue. There are circumstances where singing it, is at best insensitive, and bordering on worse. 

 

To be clear though, I don't like any of the black armbands/minute's silence/minute's applause under any circumstances.

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5 minutes ago, rb14 said:

I can see a case being made for singing YNWA when it's a tribute regarding one of our players or key figures, and it's at Anfield or possibly at a neutral venue. There are circumstances where singing it, is at best insensitive, and bordering on worse. 

 

To be clear though, I don't like any of the black armbands/minute's silence/minute's applause under any circumstances.

Insensitive or worse?!

 

Personally, I think people should be free to express their grief, respects or whatever in any appropriate way accordance with the collective.

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7 minutes ago, rb14 said:

I can see a case being made for singing YNWA when it's a tribute regarding one of our players or key figures, and it's at Anfield or possibly at a neutral venue. There are circumstances where singing it, is at best insensitive, and bordering on worse. 

 

To be clear though, I don't like any of the black armbands/minute's silence/minute's applause under any circumstances.

I've repped your second paragraph there. There's far too much of this stuff nowadays.

 

I'm not sure when YNWA would be considered insensitive though, can you elaborate on that?

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The 'issue' with YNWA when we sing it in tribute/support/rememberance etc for others is that fans of other clubs don't get it and think we are singing for/about ourselves and worse trying to disrupt the tribute.

 

They don't have anthems like YNWA that can be applied in same way - so they just don't get it and what we are doing - hence the 'making it about themselves' 'disrespectful' blah blah blah shite they come out with about us when we do it.

 

Fuck them - we can and will express ourselves about things how we want - we don't need others permission or approval.

 

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3 hours ago, an tha said:

The 'issue' with YNWA when we sing it in tribute/support/rememberance etc for others is that fans of other clubs don't get it and think we are singing for/about ourselves and worse trying to disrupt the tribute.

 

They don't have anthems like YNWA that can be applied in same way - so they just don't get it and what we are doing - hence the 'making it about themselves' 'disrespectful' blah blah blah shite they come out with about us when we do it.

 

Fuck them - we can and will express ourselves about things how we want - we don't need others permission or approval.

 

Spot on.

 

When YNWA is sung on those occasions it's heartfelt and not just a football song or our anthem.

It becomes more of hymn.

It's beautiful and means more than any other song imaginable to us.

There is no other song that can stir such passion or emotion.

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9 hours ago, Mook said:

I've repped your second paragraph there. There's far too much of this stuff nowadays.

 

I'm not sure when YNWA would be considered insensitive though, can you elaborate on that?

We've made YNWA our song. Our anthem. Yes of course it's more than that too, but for some fans of some other clubs it's anathema. It may well be that it's sung by our supporters as "heartfelt and not just a football song... ...more of hymn" as mentioned above, but that's not how other people perceive it. 

 

We can, of course, say "fuck them". I don't. 

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10 hours ago, an tha said:

The 'issue' with YNWA when we sing it in tribute/support/rememberance etc for others is that fans of other clubs don't get it and think we are singing for/about ourselves and worse trying to disrupt the tribute.

 

They don't have anthems like YNWA that can be applied in same way - so they just don't get it and what we are doing - hence the 'making it about themselves' 'disrespectful' blah blah blah shite they come out with about us when we do it.

 

Fuck them - we can and will express ourselves about things how we want - we don't need others permission or approval.

 

That's it.

 

It wasn't written as a football song and the lyrics have nothing to do with football. It's a song about hope, perseverance and solidarity; it's perfectly suited to occasions when those qualities are needed. 

 

Some pricks are too bitter to see past their hatred of us and understand the meaning of the song.

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31 minutes ago, rb14 said:

We've made YNWA our song. Our anthem. Yes of course it's more than that too, but for some fans of some other clubs it's anathema. It may well be that it's sung by our supporters as "heartfelt and not just a football song... ...more of hymn" as mentioned above, but that's not how other people perceive it. 

 

We can, of course, say "fuck them". I don't. 

You should. It's their problem.

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23 minutes ago, AngryOfTuebrook said:

That's it.

 

It wasn't written as a football song and the lyrics have nothing to do with football. It's a song about hope, perseverance and solidarity; it's perfectly suited to occasions when those qualities are needed. 

 

Some pricks are too bitter to see past their hatred of us and understand the meaning of the song.

I remember the fume from this. 

 

 

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I am tending towards rb's view on this. If it is a tribute organised by the opposition I think we should just go along with the silence / applause they request. I understand the YNWA is being sung with the finest of intentions , but it may not look like that from the other side. 

 

 

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Then the problem is definitely when other sides view it through a too narrow prism. So far as I've always been concerned, though it is of course first and foremost identified with our club, YNWA is not a clarion call to arms for Liverpool fans, its message applies to everyone.

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5 hours ago, sir roger said:

I am tending towards rb's view on this. If it is a tribute organised by the opposition I think we should just go along with the silence / applause they request. I understand the YNWA is being sung with the finest of intentions , but it may not look like that from the other side. 

 

 

Has this ever actually happened?

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Sure it's a song that we've made our own. It's about togetherness and hope, especially in the face of adversity but when we sing it for other clubs it shows our unity in the greater world outside football. The cunts should feel honoured that we sing it for them.

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I've always seen the song as a message of "we're here as one". Whether that's we're here as one (fans and team) or one as an acknowledgment of injustice, crisis, or sadness. The meaning is really simple: whatever may come, we'll be here with you until the end. 

 

If other fans don't understand that, that is none of our concern. It's our message, it's our emotion and it's our showcase of respect. It's what makes Anfield (and Liverpool as a city) what it is. Powerful, collective, and human. 

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Anyone and I mean anyone, who thinks, believes or says singing YNWA during any memorial to a tragic event or remberance can just royally fuck off as far as Im concerned.

 

Minute silences are impeccably observed with YNWA often sung at the end.

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On 18/04/2022 at 20:59, Jennings said:

YNWA is never sung disrespectfully by LFC fans.

Hang on sir, I'm not suggesting it's sung disrespectfully. If I've not been clear about that, apologies. I'm saying that other fans might (in fact, do) see it as disrespectful: "Why are you singing your anthem at our loss." Saying it's their problem if they don't understand, is frivolous and an oversimplification. 

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