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Harry's Lad

Shipwrecks.

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I've always been fascinated by shipwrecks whether ocean going liners like the Titanic or the Lusitania, warships or ancient ships.

 

One of the most famous ships lost at sea was Shackletons ship, Endurance which was crushed by ice in the Weddell Sea during his Antarctic expedition in 1915, which been found 107 years later and on the 100th anniversary of Shackletons death.

 

https://news.sky.com/story/shackletons-lost-ship-endurance-found-in-antarctica-in-milestone-of-polar-history-12561406

 

This thread is for images and discussion of shipwrecks, famous, infamous or otherwise.

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Someone recommended this on the Documentary Thread ages ago. 
 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt13175494/

 

About the MS Estonia cruise ferry which sank in 1994. It’s a five part documentary and it’s totally gripping. I think I watched it in two sittings, because it was late. I got up the next morning and put it straight on again. My missus watched it in one go. Extraordinary stuff. 
 

It’s on Amazon Prime. 

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At School they parked us in the Library one afternoon to watch the Mary Rose being rescued from the sea.

 

The televisions was a black and white portable.

 

The ship was lifted at a speed virtually impossible to register with the naked eye.

 

Fascinating stuff. 

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21 minutes ago, YorkshireRed said:

At School they parked us in the Library one afternoon to watch the Mary Rose being rescued from the sea.

 

The televisions was a black and white portable.

 

The ship was lifted at a speed virtually impossible to register with the naked eye.

 

Fascinating stuff. 

You can (or could) see the wreck in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. It's unreal considering how old it is. They have to constantly spray the wood apparently to keep it moist and stop it from rotting. 

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On 09/03/2022 at 18:03, Bjornebye said:

You can (or could) see the wreck in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. It's unreal considering how old it is. They have to constantly spray the wood apparently to keep it moist and stop it from rotting. 

 

There is similar awsome one Stockholm museum from early 1600's called Vasa, recovered from Sholm harbour. They say it is world's best preserved 17th century ship and the recoved alot of artifacts from her has she sank on made voyge and didn't even make it out to open sea.

 

They actually salvaged guns from it using a diving bell shortly after it sank. I know diving bells century's old, everytime I read about them being used back then though I find amazing that is was successful given construction techniques.

 

Anyway Vasa: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasa_(ship)

 

I also used to do quite a bit of scuba diving before I had a massive ear problem, used to find wreks amazing. Although sadly this happened fairly early on for me, so never really managed to get too in to it. There are quite a few round and about always wanted to go up to Scapa Flow, as you can imagine it is wreck divers dream, with all sorts of ww2 and ww1 ships as shallow as 12m: https://www.scapaflowwrecks.com/wrecks/

 

If you learn to dive around the North West like I did, they tend to take you to quarries where they have sunk various boats, helicopters, small planes etc. for divers.

 

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3 minutes ago, Anubis said:

 

Thats superb. Weird how far down the Titanic sunk but the two pieces stayed only 600 metres apart. They must have completely broken up not long before hitting the sea-bed. 

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