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Bjornebye

Stig Inge Bjornebye

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https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/third-liverpool-player-who-backed-15206088

 

 

But 21 years on it has been revealed how another Anfield favourite stood shoulder to shoulder with the striking dockers on the Seaforth picket line.

It's a beautifully crafted tale written by Mike Henson on The Set Pieces site .

And it highlights the unexpected social conscience displayed by Norwegian international Stig Inge Bjornebye who made 184 appearances for the Reds between 1992 and 1999.

Now Sporting director at Rosenborg, Bjornebye explained: “It was a small visit. I took them by surprise after training one day. I was curious about the strike and the reasons behind it, so I went there and stopped for a bit. We were very privileged to play professional football and you had a situation where people are out of a job.

 

“I was the one asking questions, because they were there every day. We had a good conversation. I remember it as a positive experience for me and for them.”

Mike Henson also spoke to Tony Nelson, one of those who met Bjørnebye that day.

 

And he added: “The thing we all liked was that there was nothing to Stig Inge’s visit. He just tagged himself to the end of the picket line of about 200 people. He never spoke to anyone beforehand or announced he was coming.

 

“People started recognising him straight away but he was a quiet man, very understated. He just wanted to offer his support – not as a footballer particularly, just as a human being.

 

“Other celebrities who came down would come right into the middle and speak to me or some of the other lads and ask about morale and the like, but not him. He wasn’t there to wear the shirt, or do this or that; he was there because he was Stig Inge Bjørnebye and he had a conscience.”

 

The popular full-back made his decision to visit the picket line after asking team-mate Fowler what the strike was all about.

“It’s always been important from my growing up to be aware of what’s going on around you,” Bjørnebye added. “Robbie was a local boy and when he did that gesture, I asked him a few questions about it. It was a bit of a discussion in the dressing room after the match if I remember right.

“Some players want to think football and breathe football all the time to get through the training and matches. I am a little bit the opposite. I needed other things to occupy my mind with.

 

“If I can contribute to people outside of football, and to political or cultural causes, that’s a thing I will do from time to time. I wouldn’t say I am an activist, but it’s important to care about other people as well.”

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10 hours ago, Bjornebye said:

https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/third-liverpool-player-who-backed-15206088

 

 

But 21 years on it has been revealed how another Anfield favourite stood shoulder to shoulder with the striking dockers on the Seaforth picket line.

It's a beautifully crafted tale written by Mike Henson on The Set Pieces site .

And it highlights the unexpected social conscience displayed by Norwegian international Stig Inge Bjornebye who made 184 appearances for the Reds between 1992 and 1999.

Now Sporting director at Rosenborg, Bjornebye explained: “It was a small visit. I took them by surprise after training one day. I was curious about the strike and the reasons behind it, so I went there and stopped for a bit. We were very privileged to play professional football and you had a situation where people are out of a job.

 

“I was the one asking questions, because they were there every day. We had a good conversation. I remember it as a positive experience for me and for them.”

Mike Henson also spoke to Tony Nelson, one of those who met Bjørnebye that day.

 

And he added: “The thing we all liked was that there was nothing to Stig Inge’s visit. He just tagged himself to the end of the picket line of about 200 people. He never spoke to anyone beforehand or announced he was coming.

 

“People started recognising him straight away but he was a quiet man, very understated. He just wanted to offer his support – not as a footballer particularly, just as a human being.

 

“Other celebrities who came down would come right into the middle and speak to me or some of the other lads and ask about morale and the like, but not him. He wasn’t there to wear the shirt, or do this or that; he was there because he was Stig Inge Bjørnebye and he had a conscience.”

 

The popular full-back made his decision to visit the picket line after asking team-mate Fowler what the strike was all about.

“It’s always been important from my growing up to be aware of what’s going on around you,” Bjørnebye added. “Robbie was a local boy and when he did that gesture, I asked him a few questions about it. It was a bit of a discussion in the dressing room after the match if I remember right.

“Some players want to think football and breathe football all the time to get through the training and matches. I am a little bit the opposite. I needed other things to occupy my mind with.

 

“If I can contribute to people outside of football, and to political or cultural causes, that’s a thing I will do from time to time. I wouldn’t say I am an activist, but it’s important to care about other people as well.”

 

 

Good lad and by the looks of it couldn't cross a ball and wouldn't cross a picket line 

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I can't recall him playing but any time I watch mid 90s highlights, he seems to be popping with beautiful crosses and assists yet he has a terrible reputation.

 

Was he just an awful defender or what?

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There was one season he was, briefly, the Premier League's top scorer.

 

(OK, we played the first game of the season and he scored the first goal, but the point still stands.)

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31 minutes ago, AngryOfTuebrook said:

There was one season he was, briefly, the Premier League's top scorer.

 

(OK, we played the first game of the season and he scored the first goal, but the point still stands.)


He got 16 assist one season. 

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Just now, Code said:


He got 16 assist one season. 

16 goals from a single cross is quite the bollocks. He deserved a spot in the all time left backs nominations. 

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Good player Bjornebye. There were some really talented Norwegians around at that time, who was that lad who was really good but was made of cornflakes?

 

EDIT: Vegard Heggem. He was a talent that lad

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7 hours ago, Captain Howdy said:

Good player Bjornebye. There were some really talented Norwegians around at that time, who was that lad who was really good but was made of cornflakes?

 

EDIT: Vegard Heggem. He was a talent that lad

Veggie was boss.

 

Rob Jones levels of "what if".

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8 hours ago, Captain Howdy said:

Good player Bjornebye. There were some really talented Norwegians around at that time, who was that lad who was really good but was made of cornflakes?

 

EDIT: Vegard Heggem. He was a talent that lad

Leeds had a Norwegian as well. If I recall he was good too.

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34 minutes ago, Shooter in the Motor said:

Leeds had a Norwegian as well. If I recall he was good too.

Erik Bakke? Think he was a bit younger. 

 

on Stig - reading the above and watching mid 90s highlights with him I kind of think he was better than I thought at the time. Kind of feel bad about always bombing him out of my CM teams.

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2 hours ago, JagSquared said:

Erik Bakke? Think he was a bit younger. 

 

on Stig - reading the above and watching mid 90s highlights with him I kind of think he was better than I thought at the time. Kind of feel bad about always bombing him out of my CM teams.

That's him, obviously Haaland as well but Bakke was who I thought of.

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2 hours ago, VladimirIlyich said:

He scored 13 goals one season. It was a Bakke's dozen.

Ffs I’ve repped that but it was borderline neggable. 
 

(Just more annoyed I didn’t come up with it)

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Stig had one good season. After that he was played as a left wing back with Jason McAteer on the right. Neither could cross to save their lives.

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Just now, Reckoner said:

Stig had one good season. After that he was played as a left wing back with Jason McAteer on the right. Neither could cross to save their lives.

I've read some shite on here in my life....... McAteer fine but Stig?! I'd go as far as to say he's arguably our best ever crosser of the ball! It was the only thing he really excelled at! 

 

 

 

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