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12 minutes ago, Red_or_Dead said:

WHat were you flying over at about half past one which necessitated going up 2,000ft?  The clouds?

Old Trafford. 

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1 hour ago, Red_or_Dead said:

WHat were you flying over at about half past one which necessitated going up 2,000ft?  The clouds?

Yes, exactly. Clouds. I went up to have a look and see if I could get over the top. I could easily have done so BUT, I didn't know whether there was clear air beyond. I want to avoid clouds in cold weather flying. Trouble is, outside air temp (OAT) was varying between -2 and -6. Icing comes in anywhere from about +5 and below. Other than a heated pitot, the plane has no anti-icing kit. The minute I get involved in water vapour (clouds) and low temperatures, trouble beckons, so I steer well clear. I descended again fairly promptly because diverting around the clouds at that height would have put me inside controlled airspace for which I had no clearance. Descending and diverting avoided both clouds and controlled airspace penetration.

 

Some of the other height variations will be due to being warned of other aircraft at a similar altitude (either by ATC or PilotAware/SkyEcho) and knowing I'm safer just climbing or descending to maintain separation. Some will be sightseeing. Others may be controlled zone transiting where ATC have issued a height-specific clearance. Yet more will be rising terrain ahead and the need to maintain Minimum Safe Altitude.

 

51 minutes ago, Rico1304 said:

Old Trafford. 

Like I'd fly over that shit-tip. Severe turbulence.

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Pleasure. Don't get me wrong, I'd absolutely love to take control of a big (or little) jet, but that's never going to happen. And I'm very happy in my 1/6th share of the Cessna 182.

 

No, there's a book I read called something like "The Killing Zone". It talks about the statistical probability of crashing a light aircraft. Specifically the troubling time of the first 200 hours after getting your Private Pilot's License (PPL). The first 50 or so hours, you're under the guidance and watchful eye of your instructor. Then you qualify and, rather like 17 year old passing their driving test, there's a risk of "I'm now a proper driver" - or in this case "pilot". Standards can drop, safety margins narrow. Perhaps checklists are treated with less caution. Relatively dangerous, low-level, steep banked turns over the pilot's mate's house to wave at mum and dad become par for the course. And with all that, and much more, incompetence, inexperience, or plain (plane?) bravado lead towards disaster. And the first 200 hours post- qualification are when this happens. 

 

The book goes on to point out what should be patently obvious. The way to avoid this is to continue learning. Increase skills by learning more; with proper instructors. As soon as I was allowed, I embarked on completing my Restricted Instrument Rating IR(R). This is a UK-specific rating that allows me to fly in bad weather. The overwhelming majority of private pilots are only permitted to fly in VFR (clear days) conditions. They must always be able to see the ground. The IR(R) rating means I don't have to. I can fly through and above clouds, and make instrument approaches into proper airports. It's a demanding course and it absolutely transformed my flying. The FAA PPL rating was just another course that means I could rent a plane in the USA if and when I go out there. My next stage is my Night Rating. And then my full Instrument Rating. Most pilots I know have ten times more hours in their logbooks, but say stuff like "I'd love to do my IR(R) but I've never actually got around to doing it". Their flying is therefore severely restricted. 

 

I'm only now, some 210+ hours in, beginning to feel like I'm ahead of the plane for most of the time. It's been a long hard journey and there is a lot more to do. And I still get stuff wrong. But honestly, there really is nothing like it. Early on, a pilot mate once told me "Flying a plane is easier than driving a car" and he was right. It really is. There are just a lot more rules and procedures in aviation. 

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6 hours ago, rb14 said:

Pleasure. Don't get me wrong, I'd absolutely love to take control of a big (or little) jet, but that's never going to happen. And I'm very happy in my 1/6th share of the Cessna 182.

 

No, there's a book I read called something like "The Killing Zone". It talks about the statistical probability of crashing a light aircraft. Specifically the troubling time of the first 200 hours after getting your Private Pilot's License (PPL). The first 50 or so hours, you're under the guidance and watchful eye of your instructor. Then you qualify and, rather like 17 year old passing their driving test, there's a risk of "I'm now a proper driver" - or in this case "pilot". Standards can drop, safety margins narrow. Perhaps checklists are treated with less caution. Relatively dangerous, low-level, steep banked turns over the pilot's mate's house to wave at mum and dad become par for the course. And with all that, and much more, incompetence, inexperience, or plain (plane?) bravado lead towards disaster. And the first 200 hours post- qualification are when this happens. 

 

The book goes on to point out what should be patently obvious. The way to avoid this is to continue learning. Increase skills by learning more; with proper instructors. As soon as I was allowed, I embarked on completing my Restricted Instrument Rating IR(R). This is a UK-specific rating that allows me to fly in bad weather. The overwhelming majority of private pilots are only permitted to fly in VFR (clear days) conditions. They must always be able to see the ground. The IR(R) rating means I don't have to. I can fly through and above clouds, and make instrument approaches into proper airports. It's a demanding course and it absolutely transformed my flying. The FAA PPL rating was just another course that means I could rent a plane in the USA if and when I go out there. My next stage is my Night Rating. And then my full Instrument Rating. Most pilots I know have ten times more hours in their logbooks, but say stuff like "I'd love to do my IR(R) but I've never actually got around to doing it". Their flying is therefore severely restricted. 

 

I'm only now, some 210+ hours in, beginning to feel like I'm ahead of the plane for most of the time. It's been a long hard journey and there is a lot more to do. And I still get stuff wrong. But honestly, there really is nothing like it. Early on, a pilot mate once told me "Flying a plane is easier than driving a car" and he was right. It really is. There are just a lot more rules and procedures in aviation. 

Those pics earlier are amazing. I'd be lying if I said I wasn't jealous of what you're able to do but fully appreciate everything you've had to go through to get where you are. Keep the piccies coming.

 

Sorry to ask a stupid question too, but are you cleared for flying over an air base on a weekend such as Coningsby? I only ask as there's been times I've been at Warton and light aircraft have used that as a place for touch and go practice.

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3 hours ago, Preston Red said:

Sorry to ask a stupid question too, but are you cleared for flying over an air base on a weekend such as Coningsby? I only ask as there's been times I've been at Warton and light aircraft have used that as a place for touch and go practice.

There are no stupid questions. So first of all, I'm no oracle in this regard. But there are a few different answers to your question. 

 

1. I can fly over most Military airbase as long as I stay out of their controlled airspace. Here is a screenshot of SkyDemon for Warton and its airspace....

 

Screenshot_20220115-103615.jpg

 

If you zoom in, you might be able to see that the controlled airspace never exceeds 3054 (feet). So I could fly at 3055 feet without even talking to them. Here's the specifics... 

 

Screenshot_20220115-103634.jpg

 

See down the left hand side of that box? There's a schematic of the restricted airspace for Warton. Compare that to Speke Airport (John Lennon my arse)... 

 

Screenshot_20220115-104724.jpg

 

You can see down the left hand side, all the airspace is controlled. And some of it is Class A - simply put, STAY THE FUCK OUT. One more thing, you might be wondering "Why 3054?" Warton airfield elevation is 54 feet above sea level. Add 3000 for landing traffic separation, and there's your 3054. Compare with Speke with 2081 restricted feet overhead the airfield. Airfield elevation? 81 feet. Why the 2000 and not 3000 feet? I don't know, but I'm guessing Speke doesn't frequently host Harrier jump jets? 

 

2. Going back to Warton, just because it has controlled airspace does not mean I can't go in it. I can, and frequently do, request a MATZ transit across their airspace. Unless they're busy, they'll usually grant it. 

 

3. Some military airspace is deactivated at the weekend. But that's not what you're seeing at Warton. 

 

4. What you're seeing at Warton is unusual in my experience. It's probably because there is so much restricted airspace in the vicinity, they need to be monitoring all the time. Here are the SkyDemon Pilot Notes for Warton... 

 

Screenshot_20220115-103539.jpg

 

You can see there are a few pilots saying how welcoming Warton is. It's great that Warton does that. It enables pilots to improve their skills, and keeps Warton's controllers occupied where otherwise they'd be sitting around, bored. And we're (all) paying their wages of course. 

 

5. One of our group members is ex-military. He takes out special insurance cover for the plane that enables us to land at military bases - with permission. That's very unusual, but not something that interests me because I can't foresee a reason I'd want to land at a military base. Unless of course I had an emergency and in that situation, nobody cares about the correct insurance! 

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10 hours ago, rb14 said:

There are no stupid questions. So first of all, I'm no oracle in this regard. But there are a few different answers to your question. 

 

1. I can fly over most Military airbase as long as I stay out of their controlled airspace. Here is a screenshot of SkyDemon for Warton and its airspace....

 

Screenshot_20220115-103615.jpg

 

If you zoom in, you might be able to see that the controlled airspace never exceeds 3054 (feet). So I could fly at 3055 feet without even talking to them. Here's the specifics... 

 

Screenshot_20220115-103634.jpg

 

See down the left hand side of that box? There's a schematic of the restricted airspace for Warton. Compare that to Speke Airport (John Lennon my arse)... 

 

Screenshot_20220115-104724.jpg

 

You can see down the left hand side, all the airspace is controlled. And some of it is Class A - simply put, STAY THE FUCK OUT. One more thing, you might be wondering "Why 3054?" Warton airfield elevation is 54 feet above sea level. Add 3000 for landing traffic separation, and there's your 3054. Compare with Speke with 2081 restricted feet overhead the airfield. Airfield elevation? 81 feet. Why the 2000 and not 3000 feet? I don't know, but I'm guessing Speke doesn't frequently host Harrier jump jets? 

 

2. Going back to Warton, just because it has controlled airspace does not mean I can't go in it. I can, and frequently do, request a MATZ transit across their airspace. Unless they're busy, they'll usually grant it. 

 

3. Some military airspace is deactivated at the weekend. But that's not what you're seeing at Warton. 

 

4. What you're seeing at Warton is unusual in my experience. It's probably because there is so much restricted airspace in the vicinity, they need to be monitoring all the time. Here are the SkyDemon Pilot Notes for Warton... 

 

Screenshot_20220115-103539.jpg

 

You can see there are a few pilots saying how welcoming Warton is. It's great that Warton does that. It enables pilots to improve their skills, and keeps Warton's controllers occupied where otherwise they'd be sitting around, bored. And we're (all) paying their wages of course. 

 

5. One of our group members is ex-military. He takes out special insurance cover for the plane that enables us to land at military bases - with permission. That's very unusual, but not something that interests me because I can't foresee a reason I'd want to land at a military base. Unless of course I had an emergency and in that situation, nobody cares about the correct insurance! 

Amazing answers and fantastic to have someone like yourself around to break it down into layman's terms. Many thanks for that.

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I hate flying so for Christmas 2 years ago my Mrs bought me a flight experience on one of these flight simulators to see if it would help by understanding what goes on during a flight. Got cancelled a few times  due to covid but finally got to do in November. The flight deck was a Boeing 737, did an auto take off from Manchester airport and this is me attempting to land at Kefalonia in Greece with a lot of help from the instructor who is a Ryanair pilot on a zero hours contract and does the instructing when he’s not flying. I was shitting it desperately hoping not to crash. 

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24 minutes ago, Atticus Finch said:

I hate flying so for Christmas 2 years ago my Mrs bought me a flight experience on one of these flight simulators to see if it would help by understanding what goes on during a flight. Got cancelled a few times  due to covid but finally got to do in November. The flight deck was a Boeing 737, did an auto take off from Manchester airport and this is me attempting to land at Kefalonia in Greece with a lot of help from the instructor who is a Ryanair pilot on a zero hours contract and does the instructing when he’s not flying. I was shitting it desperately hoping not to crash. 

Superb mate I feared for the passengers towards the end like 

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*Presses 'call cabin crew' button... "Excuse me, I need something to cut this in-flight chicken?" 

 

"Coming right up".

 

sa_airlink_js41-zk-nrj_venetia_220103_1.jpgsa_airlink_js41-zk-nrj_venetia_220103_2.jpgsa_airlink_js41-zk-nrj_venetia_220103_3.jpg

 

From The Aviation Herald

 

Accident: SA Airlink JS41 at Venetia Mine on Jan 3rd 2022, bird strike disintegrates propeller, cabin punctured


A SA Airlink Jetstream JS-41, registration ZS-NRJ performing a charter flight from Johannesburg to Venetia Mine (South Africa), was on approach to Venetia Mine when a bird impacted the right hand propeller causing one of the blades to separate and penetrate the cabin. The aircraft continued for a safe landing.

The airline confirmed the incident on Jan 4th 2022 stating: "Yesterday an Airlink Jetstream 41 aircraft operating a private charter flight struck a large bird upon landing at Venetia airfield. None of the passengers or crew were injured although the aircraft sustained substantial damage."

Venetia Mine is located at Coordinates S22.4481 E29.3377.

 

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On 15/01/2022 at 21:35, Atticus Finch said:

I hate flying so for Christmas 2 years ago my Mrs bought me a flight experience on one of these flight simulators to see if it would help by understanding what goes on during a flight. Got cancelled a few times  due to covid but finally got to do in November. The flight deck was a Boeing 737, did an auto take off from Manchester airport and this is me attempting to land at Kefalonia in Greece with a lot of help from the instructor who is a Ryanair pilot on a zero hours contract and does the instructing when he’s not flying. I was shitting it desperately hoping not to crash. 

Well done!

 

D1C2E9DC-CD26-470D-A26D-7E97627F78F9.jpeg4C9781A2-3C86-4D73-8E26-10AC665661D0.jpeg

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6 minutes ago, Preston Red said:

Should have built Harrier 2.0 instead of that F35 junk.

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