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Bjornebye

Boxing 2021

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Also, “melt” is the fucking worst word going. Where did it come from? Sprung up from nowhere and I hate it. He’d have won me over a bit with “blert” like pricey, or better yet if he’d called him a texan.

 

Melt? Fuck off

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8 minutes ago, Belarus said:

In fact, Davies Jr is a bell. Reminded myself why I don’t like him with that video. Still have the love if he’s fighting most, but ritson is sound. And shit

I briefly spoke to Robbie Davis a few years ago at Total Fitness, he came across as a prick.

 

Didn't say it to his face like.

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5 minutes ago, Bjornebye said:

Didn't Paul Smith kick off on someone off here on the Kop? Was it @DanDanShaw ? Where have you gone anyway 

Wasn’t that because DanDan was slating him for being shit years ago?

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I think DanDan was in that Joe Gallagher gym circle, so knew most of his fighters. So I don't think it was a case of Paul Smith just picking on a random person, he knew him and it's not a great idea to openly criticise a bloke who's as hard as nails who sees you about.

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5 hours ago, Elite said:

I think DanDan was in that Joe Gallagher gym circle, so knew most of his fighters. So I don't think it was a case of Paul Smith just picking on a random person, he knew him and it's not a great idea to openly criticise a bloke who's as hard as nails who sees you about.

Yeah he's mates with Crolla. 

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6 hours ago, Belarus said:

Also, “melt” is the fucking worst word going. Where did it come from? Sprung up from nowhere and I hate it. He’d have won me over a bit with “blert” like pricey, or better yet if he’d called him a texan.

 

Melt? Fuck off

Melt has been around for all my life time!

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18 minutes ago, Barrington Womble said:

Melt has been around for all my life time!

I’ve heard it before, but it’s rife now in its usage and it’s shite

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9 minutes ago, Barrington Womble said:

Like all words, I think it has its time and place. They can all be over used. 

Over used - that’s probably it. Hardly noticed it before

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1 hour ago, Belarus said:

Not surprised like!

 

Was it DanDan who loved a £500? Or was that @Brownie?

Smith buttonholed Dan Dan at Anfield and offered him out in the Kemlyn car park. Dan Dan didn't want to bust him up before his upcoming fight so politely declined before asking the Paddy Power girl if he could put a monkey on Del Boy Chisora's next fight.

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11 minutes ago, sir roger said:

Smith buttonholed Dan Dan at Anfield and offered him out in the Kemlyn car park. Dan Dan didn't want to bust him up before his upcoming fight so politely declined before asking the Paddy Power girl if he could put a monkey on Del Boy Chisora's next fight.

 

Just now, Captain Turdseye said:


Yeah, that was DanDan, £500 on Chisora to win a fight he obviously went on to lose. 

Nice one both - yeah, it’s all coming back to me now

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6 hours ago, Remmie said:

It was £500 to beat Fury in the rematch as well, haha

Yeah, I thought there was more than one.

 

Whatever happened to Craig Glover? Did he just decide to jib it after the Billam Smith loss? Really liked him - seemed a nice lad.

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Sugar Hill: "Just jab this motherfucker god damn it!"

 

Summoning Emmanuel right there.

 

"I don't give a fuck if it lands or not, just let your punches go! Shit!"

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BOXING - THE LONELIEST SPORT

 

'In the first round when Dempsey hit me with a left hook, I tried hard to continue but I was rapidly losing my strength. My eye closed at the end of the third round and I realised it would be useless for me to continue, as I could hardly see. It was hard to admit defeat, but Dempsey is the hardest puncher I ever faced.' - Jess Willard

 

4th July 1919 - Bay View Park Arena, Toledo.

 

'The Manassa Mauler,' Jack Dempsey pummels Jess 'The Pottawatomie Giant,' Willard to capture the Heavyweight World Championship.

 

Willard, who towered over Dempsey at a whopping 6ft 6½in was making his 2nd title defence since scoring a 26th round knockout over the legendary Jack Johnson 4 years earlier in Havana, Cuba.

 

The fight began shortly after 4pm in the baking 110°F (43.3°C) heat. Timekeeper, William Warren Barber attempted to ring the bell to start the opening round but when he tugged on the bell rope, it came off in his hand. Moments later, the fight began when Barber blew a whistle instead.

 

As a result of the confusion, the round ended 10 seconds early with referee, Ollie Pecord forgetting to reset his stopwatch after the delay at the beginning of the round. When the fight was finally underway, it saw the Champion completely and utterly dominated by Dempsey, who relentlessly pummeled Willard and knocking him down no less than 7 times.

 

The confusion continued when Dempsey floored Willard for the 7th time in the neutral corner and Pecord's count reached seven before Barber blew his whistle to signal the end of the round. The crowd's cheers were so loud however, that Pecord failed to hear the whistle and declared Dempsey the winner via 1st round knockout.

 

Dempsey was making his way back to the dressing room when he was called back to the ring once Pecord had been informed of the discrepancy and the fight continued.

 

The 2nd and 3rd rounds saw a brave Willard defiantly remain on his feet, but he endured a sustained and savage beating at the hands of Dempsey. Willard made his way back to his corner, battered and bleeding and could be heard repeatedly sobbing the words; 'I have $100,000 and a farm in Kansas' over and over.

 

His corner decided Willard had suffered enough and pulled him out of the fight. Dempsey was the new Heavyweight Champion of the World.

 

Willard would later dismiss reports of him suffering a savage beating, claiming he only suffered a deep cut over his eye and a bad cut inside his mouth. It's claimed by some sources however that he sustained a broken jaw, multiple facial fractures, several broken ribs, permanent hearing loss in one ear as well as numerous cuts.

 

Almost immediately after the fight, rumours began to circulate about the possibility of foul play, due to the the ease in which Dempsey demolished Willard.

 

Further fuel was added to the fire in January 1964, when Sports Illustrated's January issue included and article entitled 'He didn't know the gloves were loaded,' where Dempsey's former manager, Jack Kearns admitted to loading Dempsey's gloves by disguising plaster of paris as talculm powder - something he claimed to have done without Dempsey being aware.

 

Kearns claimed his motivation stemmed from his placing a $10,000 bet on Dempsey winning via 1st round knockout at 10-1 odds. 

 

Nat Fleischer, founder of Ring Magazine, was at the fight and dismissed Kearns' story however by saying;

 

'Jack Dempsey had no loaded gloves, and no plaster of Paris over his bandages. I watched the proceedings, and the only person who had anything to do with the taping of Jack's hands was Deforest. Kearns had nothing to do with it, so his plaster of Paris story is simply not true. Deforest himself said that he regarded the stories of Dempsey's gloves being loaded as libel, calling them 'trash' and said he did not apply any foreign substance to them, which I can verify since I watched the taping.'

 

Upon being made aware of the article, Dempsey was outraged and sued the publication for $3 million, although the matter was later settled out of court for an undisclosed amount along with a statement from Sports Illustrated 'wholeheartedly accepting Dempsey's denial of the charge of the late Jack Kearns.'

 

Retrospective scientific analysis later concluded that plaster of paris would've been ineffective had it been applied to the gloves due to the 110°f (43.3°c) heat on the afternoon of the fight - which would've caused the plaster to crumble.

 

Willard also claimed in an interview with Harry Carpenter that Dempsey had hidden a metal bolt in the palm of his glove and had used it to inflict damage on him. He also showed the supposed bolt to Carpenter, claiming that it had been found inside the ring.

 

Regardless of the rumours of foul play - which most experts and historians consider to be untrue - the epic contest is widely considered as one of the most exciting and brutal Heavyweight title fights of all time.

 

 

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He talks some absolute nonsense Joshua. His media persona is like a glitchy algorithm. Reminds me of a character from Westworld.

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Just got round to watching the US bill from the weekend.

 

Shaking Stevenson looks a fantastic prospect , did a real demolition job on a decent champion In Herring.

 

Ali's grandson doesn't look too special , his mum is tidy though.

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Boxing - The Loneliest Sport.

 

On this day... 'If a man can hit hard enough, he can fight anybody in the world, and I can hit hard enough.' - Ted 'Kid' Lewis

 

 On this day in 1894, one of the finest boxers to ever hail from the British Isles was born. That man was none other than two-time Welterweight World Champion and International Boxing Hall of Fame Inductee, Ted 'Kid' Lewis.

 

Although today is widely recognised as Lewis' date of birth, his actual birthday is often debated, with some sources believing it to be the 28th October 1893 or the 24th October 1894.

 

Lewis, whose real name was Gershon Mendeloff, was born and raised in the slums of London's East End - a breeding ground of durable and gifted boxers - and was urged to take up boxing by a policeman who had witnessed Lewis' ferocity during a street fight.

 

Thankfully, Lewis took the officer's advice on board and embarked on a journey that would see his name etched into the record books throughout the ages.

 

He made his professional debut in 1909 and despite getting off to a losing start, he eventually found his rhythm, fighting numerous times each month in an era when it wasn't unheard of for a boxer to fight on an almost weekly basis. In the year of 1911 alone, Lewis fought an incredible 58 bouts - a figure that most modern day professionals fail to reach throughout their entire careers.

 

Lewis', or 'The Aldgate Sphinx' as he was then known by his admirers, had his first taste of Championship success on the 6th October 1913 when he scored a 17th round knockout over Alec Lambert to capture the vacant British and European Featherweight titles.

 

The following year saw Lewis travel to Australia, winning 4 out of 5 contests before arriving in the United States in the hope of achieving his dream of winning a world title. Lewis' opportunity came on the 31st August 1915 when he faced Jack Britton in the Boston Arena for the Welterweight World Championship.

 

Lewis' challenge was a successful one, seeing him defeat Britton via 12 round points decision to claim the title. Lewis, who was just 21 at the time of winning the title, had already fought an incredible 160 times prior to making his challenge. The two men fought again the following month but the outcome was the same as their first encounter; a points win for Lewis.

 

Lewis went on to successfully defend his title against the likes of Joe Mandot, Willie Ritchie and Kid Graves before facing Britton for the 3rd time, this time losing via 10th round Newspaper decision. The two rivals fought on 14 further occasions, with Lewis losing seven, winning five and drawing twice.

 

In 1919, Lewis then made his move up to the Middleweight division to face the World Champion of the day, Mike O'Dowd. Lewis would eventually go on to lose over 10 rounds via newspaper decision but considering he'd started his career as a Featherweight, his ambitions were worthy of praise.

 

Lewis did however capture the vacant British Middleweight Title the following year with a 4th round knockout of Johnny Bee. Lewis then dropped back down to Welterweight to reclaim the British and Welterweight titles by defeating Johnny Basham in a brace of 20 round contests.

 

The two men squared off once again for the Middleweight versions of the British and European titles, with Basham ultimately unable to go the distance with his adversary. In his very next outing, Lewis won the British Light-Heavyweight title - the 4th weight class in which he captured the British crown - with a punishing victory over Boy McCormick.

 

In 1922, Lewis made his challenge for the World Light-Heavyweight and European Heavyweight titles simultaneously when he faced the legendary Frenchman, Georges Carpentier. Unfortunately for Lewis, the brutal power and natural strength of Carpentier proved a step too far for the former Featherweight and he was knocked out in the 1st round.

 

Lewis continued his professional campaign for a further seven years, enjoying British, Commonwealth and European title success in both the Welterweight and Middleweight divisions before finally hanging up his gloves in 1929 with a final professional record of 191-32-14 (77 wins by KO) according to BoxRec, although this doesn't include newspaper decisions.

 

After his retirement from boxing, Lewis briefly became a bodyguard for Oswald Mosley but after Mosley's movement; The British Union of Fascists, announced themselves as an Anti-Semitic movement, Lewis parted ways with Mosley.

 

Lewis also embarked in various business ventures which included working as a boxing trainer and manager, a travel agent, a haberdasher, a bookmaker and a celebrity guest speaker.

 

He also found himself two admirers in the notorious East End Gangsters, Ronnie and Reggie Kray who would often be seen with Lewis out on the town. The Kray twins also used Lewis as a decoy when organising an escape of an associate of theirs from Dartmoor Prison.

 

Lewis spent his final years living in Nightingale House in Clapham, London - a retirement home for the Jewish Elderly. Lewis' health gradually deteriorated, seeing him suffer from Parkinson's disease and poor eyesight before his death in 1970, aged 76.

 

Regardless of his actual date of birth, Lewis' contribution to the sport is definitely worthy of the highest level of praise and recognition - on any date one cares to choose. Happy Heavenly Birthday Champ, Rest in Peace.

 

 

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