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Keir Starmer

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1 minute ago, Numero said:

Phillips is already a front bencher but a promotion… I don’t get it. Maybe they think she can be the female Johnson?

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4 minutes ago, Numero said:

Phillips is already a front bencher but a promotion… I don’t get it. Maybe they think she can be the female Johnson?

That's what she thinks she is or hopes she's going to be and she's partially right. It's all about having a big gob and no morals, and getting on the celeb train.

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1 minute ago, Numero said:

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Yeah, I wasn’t impressed with the casting for Brad and Janet in the Rocky Horror Picture Show remake either.

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BTW apart from the Rayner sacking, is everything else we're losing our shit over just Twitter rumour at the minute?

 

Just want to make sure I'm shaking my head in disbelief over actual happenings rather than Twitter mischief. Don't like wasting emotional energy, that's all 

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3 minutes ago, skend04 said:

BTW apart from the Rayner sacking, is everything else we're losing our shit over just Twitter rumour at the minute?

 

Just want to make sure I'm shaking my head in disbelief over actual happenings rather than Twitter mischief. Don't like wasting emotional energy, that's all 

I ditched Twitter two months ago.  Have found time for 3 more wanks a month and my phone battery lasts twice as long now.  No negatives.  Zero. 

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Quote

Labour may not be in government but its ideas are already reshaping Britain. This week’s Budget resembled a raid on the party’s manifesto: higher spending on the NHS, higher government borrowing (rather than seeking a budget surplus), a digital services tax and the abolition of PFIs.

 

And beyond Westminster, Corbynomics is already being implemented. There is no more successful example than Preston. The Lancashire city, which I reported from earlier this year, has been named the UK’s most improved urban area in a study by PricewaterhouseCoopers and Demos (Preston was ranked 14th overall, ahead of London in 15th place).


When a planned £700m redevelopment of the city centre collapsed in 2011, the Labour-led authority resolved that Preston would chart its own course. Rather than chasing inward investment from large multinationals, as it previously had, the city forged an alternative growth model (council leader Matthew Brown cited research showing that “big supermarkets cost jobs”).


Before 2013, major public bodies, such as the University of Central Lancashire and Lancashire Constabulary, had a combined annual budget of £1bn, but startlingly little of this money was spent locally. Inspired by the “Mondragon model” in the Basque Country and the “Cleveland model” in the US, Brown’s team persuaded six of these “anchor institutions” to procure more goods and services from Preston-based firms (such as local builders, printers and farmers), rather than relying on outsourcing companies often headquartered in London. The council also became the first northern employer to pay the full living wage.

 

Since then, the share of the public procurement budget spent in the city has risen from 5 per cent in 2013 to 18 per cent (a gain of £75m), while across Lancashire it has risen from 39 per cent to 79 per cent (a gain of £200m). Unemployment has fallen from 6.5 per cent in 2014 to 3.1 per cent and, as the Demos study notes, Preston has also achieved above-average improvements for health, transport, work-life balance, and youth and adult skills.

 

Worker-owned co-operatives are promoted through the recently-established Preston Co-operative Network, a credit union combats avaricious payday lenders and a not-for-profit energy firm Fairerpower Red Rose has saved consumers more than £2m.

 

“We needed to do something that was more resilient but also, crucially, put more democracy and ownership in the Preston economy,” Brown, the left-leaning council leader, told me when we met in September.

 

Long before the latest study, Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell cited Preston as an example of the potential for economic transformation. “This kind of radicalism is exactly what we need across the whole country,” said McDonnell when he visited in 2016. The following year, Corbyn praised the city’s “inspiring innovation”.

 

In February, McDonnell established a Community Wealth Building Unit to export the Preston model to other areas of the UK. On 9 September, he announced that Labour would require all private companies employing more than 250 people to establisher worker “ownership funds”. Like Brown, McDonnell recognises the flaws of past nationalised industries, characterised by a management he described as “often too distant, too bureaucratic and too removed from the reality of those at the forefront of delivering services”.

 

Brown acknowledged that “there are lots of critiques emerging saying this is a form of protectionism”. However, he added, “they are very easy to deal with because we’ve got social value and European regulations. If there’s a much better bid on price, quality, social value from outside it would have to go to that outside supplier.”

 

The council leader is now heightening his ambitions. He aims to establish a Lancashire-wide community bank to provide loans to small businesses and Preston is pioneering the use of drone technology in public services and urban construction.

 

The city exemplifies what Neil McInroy, the head of the Centre for Local Economic Strategies, calls the “new municipalism”. Rather than a narrow commitment to the state, this model encourages a plurality of forms: co-operatives, mutuals and trusts, as well as government ownership. In Spain, the Mondragon Corporation, the world’s largest worker owned co-operative, encompasses 260 individual co-ops, employs 75,000 people and has annual revenues of over €12bn.


Crucially, as Brown argues, Preston’s approach makes socialism more resilient to attack. “One of the reasons that Thatcher found it so easy to privatise a lot of the public assets was that working people didn’t have a huge amount of affinity with them. If they had been on the board, sharing the profits and had a real ownership stake then she wouldn’t have been able to do it, they would have been hugely popular.”

 

 

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1 hour ago, Captain Turdseye said:

Not sure I want to be ‘led’ by a shadow cabinet that has Jess Phillips front and centre. 

She put on even more weight ?

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26 minutes ago, Duff Man said:

 

 

 

Everything I’ve been saying Liverpool should have been doing for years. 
 

Instead, all it takes to get voted in here is to do absolutely fuck all and blame it on the tories. 

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1 hour ago, A Red said:

I want to like Starmer. I want Labour to be a party I can vote for.

 

There must be millions like me

I want to, too. Unfortunately...

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1 hour ago, Red74 said:

Everything I’ve been saying Liverpool should have been doing for years. 
 

Instead, all it takes to get voted in here is to do absolutely fuck all and blame it on the tories. 

Chippy Tits and his gang were too busy lining their pockets.  Let's see if Joanne Anderson can switch to something like the Preston model.

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Hadn't realised that if Tracy Brabin wins the West Yorkshire mayoralty announced today , Batley and Spen will need a by-election in a vulnerable area. Depressing situation to hear journalists suggesting that the Labour leadership would cheer loudest if she lost today.

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What were these terrible lines? Do we just take it as a fact they were terrible because Owen Jones said a source said they were terrible? I mean, this entire thing is a cluster fuck. It's a lot of 'quick, let's overreact before we lose our opportunity' stuff on Twitter at the moment. 

 

Has political discourse in the UK every been in a worse state? I could write a basic program that spits out all of this nonsense. You know how people are going to reply based on a set of known variables. They're reduced to unthinking drones, drip-fed by a twitter collective consciousness. It's actually quite disturbing. 

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12 hours ago, Moo said:

Are you going to be specific, or was it just a needless comment?

Not needled over me taking the piss out of a politician are you? If you want my opinion on Nandy i think she blows with the wind, didn't she promise to break Corbyn? Voted for Brexit, probably only  because she knew she was in Brexit majority seat with a slender majority. All said and done though I don't really hold any of that against her, she's smart and fleet footed and she is after all a politician. I suppose Nandys the opposite of Diane Abbott who tries to act all principled but is unfortunately for her/us/Labour completely fucking useless. Nandys competent, always well briefed and is a good media operator, which is more than can be said for most of them.

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