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24 minutes ago, mattyq said:

No, mate

You're mistaken

We've been informed many times on here and elsewhere that we've now got herd immunity and t cells coming out of our arses

Soz, I forgot it was dying out and had run its natural course. 

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3 hours ago, Bruce Spanner said:

The truth will out...


The UK has the most excess deaths across Europe!

 

British exceptionalism at its fucking finest.

 

The United Kingdom suffered the highest rate of excess deaths during the Covid-19 pandemic in a comparison of 21 European countries, an analysis from Britain’s statistics office showed on Thursday.

Epidemiologists say excess mortality – deaths from all causes that exceed the five-year average for the time of year – is the best way of gauging deaths from a disease outbreak because it is internationally comparable.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) analysis confirmed the UK’s place as one of the countries worst hit by a pandemic that has killed more than 666,000 people worldwide.

About 65,000 more people than usual have died from all causes across the United Kingdom so far this year, the highest total in Europe.

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Analysis shows England had highest excess deaths across Europe in first half of 2020 

Analysis shows England had highest excess deaths across Europe in first half of 2020 

Edward Morgan, from the ONS’s health analysis and life events division, said the first half of 2020 saw “extraordinary increases” in mortality rates across Western Europe. Picture: PA 

 
THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2020 - 11:59 AM
PRESS ASSOCIATION

England had the highest levels of excess mortality in Europe across the first half of 2020, according to new analysis by the UK Office for National Statistics (ONS).

The country experienced the longest continuous period of excess deaths as well as the highest levels, a comparison of 23 European countries found.

It is the first time the ONS has compared mortality rates in different countries to measure the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

By the week ending May 29, England had a relative cumulative age-standardised mortality rate of 7.55% – meaning it was 7.55% higher than the average mortality rate between 2015 and 2019.

Spain ranked second at 6.65%, followed by Scotland (5.11%), Belgium (3.89%) and Wales (2.78%).

England still had the highest cumulative excess deaths rate two weeks later, by the week ending June 12, though at this point there was only data available on 17 other countries to compare it with.

From February 14 to the week ending June 12, England experienced the second highest peak of excess deaths, after Spain, out of 21 countries with data available.

 

 

Edward Morgan, from the ONS’s health analysis and life events division, said the first half of 2020 saw “extraordinary increases” in mortality rates across Western Europe, when compared with the average over the past five years.

He continued: “While none of the four UK nations had a peak mortality level as high as Spain or the worst-hit local areas of Spain and Italy, excess mortality was geographically widespread throughout the UK during the pandemic, whereas it was more geographically localised in most countries of Western Europe.

Combined with the relatively slow downward ‘tail’ of the pandemic in the UK, this meant that, by the end of May, England had seen the highest overall relative excess mortality out of all the European countries compared.

Using the measure of all-cause mortality to calculate the impact of the pandemic means results are not affected by the different ways countries record Covid-19 deaths.

It also considers the indirect impacts of the pandemic, such as reduced or delayed access to care.

The ONS used weekly death registration data published by Eurostat and ONS data for England and Wales, National Records Scotland (NRS) data for Scotland, and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) data for Northern Ireland.

It found little evidence of abnormal mortality rates in Eastern Europe.

Every local authority area in the UK experienced excess mortality between the weeks ending April 3 and May 8, while other countries in Western Europe experienced more localised excess deaths, the ONS said.

The ONS said that while Spain recorded the highest peak of excess mortality, England had higher levels of cumulative excess mortality thanks to longer periods of time with mortality rates above the average.

Looking at major cities, the highest peak excess mortality was in Madrid, which saw levels of excess mortality in the week ending March 27 that were more than five times higher (or 432.7% higher) than the average expected mortality rate in 2015 to 2019.

In the UK, Birmingham was the city with the highest peak excess mortality (249.7% in the week ending April 17), followed by London (226.7% in the week ending April 17) and Manchester (198.4% in the week ending April 17).

Regions in Spain, Italy and England made up the top 20 areas across Europe with the highest recorded peak mortality rates.

Areas in England included Brent, Enfield and Ealing, in greater London, and Thurrock in Essex.

Brent was the worst affected area in England, experiencing the highest peak excess mortality – 357.5% in the week ending April 17.

The area with the highest peak mortality rate in Europe was Bergamo in Italy – 847.7% in the week ending March 20.

2.54781731.jpg?w=640

(PA Graphics)

Dr Veena Raleigh, senior fellow at The King’s Fund, said the pandemic has exposed “the wide and widening health divide” in the UK population.

She said: “Over the past decade, life expectancy improvements in the UK have lagged behind our European peers.

With the worst coronavirus death toll in Europe, there is a very real risk that the UK will slide even further down the life expectancy league tables.

“The priority for the UK is to control the pandemic and learn lessons ahead of a potential second wave, but it is also essential to tackle the underlying reasons for stalling life expectancy in recent years – many of which contribute to poor Covid-19 outcomes.”

Jonathan Ashworth, Labour’s shadow health secretary, said the statistics are devastating, adding: “We can no longer hide from the fact the Government has not handled this crisis well and needs to urgently learn lessons from its mistakes.”

 

from here: https://www.irishexaminer.com/world/arid-40024550.html

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1 hour ago, Rico1304 said:

Yes Lewis, we’re all in this together. 
 

 

Fucking hell.  He could have chosen a less wealth displaying photo to attach to that message.

  • Upvote 1

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3 hours ago, mattyq said:

Haha, it was terrifying as a kid but looks quite tame there

Don't remember all those balls, either

Wonder if it's still open?

It got burnt down years ago, probably an insurance job. 

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2 hours ago, DJLJ said:

Analysis shows England had highest excess deaths across Europe in first half of 2020 

Analysis shows England had highest excess deaths across Europe in first half of 2020 

Edward Morgan, from the ONS’s health analysis and life events division, said the first half of 2020 saw “extraordinary increases” in mortality rates across Western Europe. Picture: PA 

 
THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2020 - 11:59 AM
PRESS ASSOCIATION

England had the highest levels of excess mortality in Europe across the first half of 2020, according to new analysis by the UK Office for National Statistics (ONS).

The country experienced the longest continuous period of excess deaths as well as the highest levels, a comparison of 23 European countries found.

It is the first time the ONS has compared mortality rates in different countries to measure the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

By the week ending May 29, England had a relative cumulative age-standardised mortality rate of 7.55% – meaning it was 7.55% higher than the average mortality rate between 2015 and 2019.

Spain ranked second at 6.65%, followed by Scotland (5.11%), Belgium (3.89%) and Wales (2.78%).

England still had the highest cumulative excess deaths rate two weeks later, by the week ending June 12, though at this point there was only data available on 17 other countries to compare it with.

From February 14 to the week ending June 12, England experienced the second highest peak of excess deaths, after Spain, out of 21 countries with data available.

 

 

Edward Morgan, from the ONS’s health analysis and life events division, said the first half of 2020 saw “extraordinary increases” in mortality rates across Western Europe, when compared with the average over the past five years.

He continued: “While none of the four UK nations had a peak mortality level as high as Spain or the worst-hit local areas of Spain and Italy, excess mortality was geographically widespread throughout the UK during the pandemic, whereas it was more geographically localised in most countries of Western Europe.

Combined with the relatively slow downward ‘tail’ of the pandemic in the UK, this meant that, by the end of May, England had seen the highest overall relative excess mortality out of all the European countries compared.

Using the measure of all-cause mortality to calculate the impact of the pandemic means results are not affected by the different ways countries record Covid-19 deaths.

It also considers the indirect impacts of the pandemic, such as reduced or delayed access to care.

The ONS used weekly death registration data published by Eurostat and ONS data for England and Wales, National Records Scotland (NRS) data for Scotland, and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) data for Northern Ireland.

It found little evidence of abnormal mortality rates in Eastern Europe.

Every local authority area in the UK experienced excess mortality between the weeks ending April 3 and May 8, while other countries in Western Europe experienced more localised excess deaths, the ONS said.

The ONS said that while Spain recorded the highest peak of excess mortality, England had higher levels of cumulative excess mortality thanks to longer periods of time with mortality rates above the average.

Looking at major cities, the highest peak excess mortality was in Madrid, which saw levels of excess mortality in the week ending March 27 that were more than five times higher (or 432.7% higher) than the average expected mortality rate in 2015 to 2019.

In the UK, Birmingham was the city with the highest peak excess mortality (249.7% in the week ending April 17), followed by London (226.7% in the week ending April 17) and Manchester (198.4% in the week ending April 17).

Regions in Spain, Italy and England made up the top 20 areas across Europe with the highest recorded peak mortality rates.

Areas in England included Brent, Enfield and Ealing, in greater London, and Thurrock in Essex.

Brent was the worst affected area in England, experiencing the highest peak excess mortality – 357.5% in the week ending April 17.

The area with the highest peak mortality rate in Europe was Bergamo in Italy – 847.7% in the week ending March 20.

2.54781731.jpg?w=640

(PA Graphics)

Dr Veena Raleigh, senior fellow at The King’s Fund, said the pandemic has exposed “the wide and widening health divide” in the UK population.

She said: “Over the past decade, life expectancy improvements in the UK have lagged behind our European peers.

With the worst coronavirus death toll in Europe, there is a very real risk that the UK will slide even further down the life expectancy league tables.

“The priority for the UK is to control the pandemic and learn lessons ahead of a potential second wave, but it is also essential to tackle the underlying reasons for stalling life expectancy in recent years – many of which contribute to poor Covid-19 outcomes.”

Jonathan Ashworth, Labour’s shadow health secretary, said the statistics are devastating, adding: “We can no longer hide from the fact the Government has not handled this crisis well and needs to urgently learn lessons from its mistakes.”

 

from here: https://www.irishexaminer.com/world/arid-40024550.html

Or as the BBC will report it; 

 

Analysis shows Spain had the highest excess deaths across European Union.

  • Upvote 2

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Herman Cain, the former presidential candidate and former CEO of Godfather’s Pizza, has died from coronavirus, according to an obituary sent from his verified Twitter account and Newsmax, where he was launching a television show.

Cain, as a co-chair of Black Voices for Trump, tested positive for Covid 19 on June 29 and was hospitalized on July 1 after developing symptoms serious enough to be hospitalized, according to the statement posted on Twitter. 

Cain's last public appearance was as one of the surrogates at President Trump's June 20 rally in Tulsa OK.

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Has anyone been on to say theme Statistics are a lie yet? I mean only the other day someone posted stats to say it’s dying away.... I mean surely they can’t have been wrong ???? 

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26 minutes ago, TheHowieLama said:

Herman Cain, the former presidential candidate and former CEO of Godfather’s Pizza, has died from coronavirus, according to an obituary sent from his verified Twitter account and Newsmax, where he was launching a television show.

Cain, as a co-chair of Black Voices for Trump, tested positive for Covid 19 on June 29 and was hospitalized on July 1 after developing symptoms serious enough to be hospitalized, according to the statement posted on Twitter. 

Cain's last public appearance was as one of the surrogates at President Trump's June 20 rally in Tulsa OK.

 

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2 hours ago, Rico1304 said:

Yes Lewis, we’re all in this together. 
 

 

That's class, the lack of self awareness is outstanding. Princess Anne was on telly the other day talking about watching her kids cope with the pressures of home schooling her grandkids.

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45 minutes ago, littletedwest said:

Makes no fucking sense, I can meet my mum and sister tomorrow in a pub with 50 others but not in my mums flat

They've now said it applies to pubs as well. You know there will be loads of people "accidentally" meeting in pubs

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7 hours ago, johnsusername said:

It's weird seeing people bunching together like that now. 

That brings back some memories. 

 

That wheel burned my 90s synthetic LFC shorts to a crisp and did worse to my legs.

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