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6 minutes ago, Spy Bee said:

As they are not releasing pillar two cases by locality, how did they know Leicester was experiencing a spike? 

 

I think there's an element of pour encourager les autres about all of this.

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4 minutes ago, Strontium Dog™ said:

 

I think there's an element of pour encourager les autres about all of this.

Sorry, I don't speak Italian.

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8 hours ago, Dougie Do'ins said:

Just wait and see the shit we get if a similar thing happens in Liverpool after the celebrations. 

 

There were rallies in lots of places though so you expect to see similar results in those places too.

 

Wouldn't surprise me if there was a dodgy batch of testing kits about.

There was a Leicester MP on the telly this morning indirectly blaming their disproportionate number of densely populated houses. 

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29 minutes ago, The Gaul said:

There was a Leicester MP on the telly this morning indirectly blaming their disproportionate number of densely populated houses. 

Well, "hot-bedding" and densely populated/multi-generational houses would certainly aid the transmission of the virus. I don't see why it's considered outrageous to suggest this?

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8 minutes ago, Spy Bee said:

Well, "hot-bedding" and densely populated/multi-generational houses would certainly aid the transmission of the virus. I don't see why it's considered outrageous to suggest this?

Did I say it was outrageous?

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Just now, The Gaul said:

Did I say it was outrageous?

If that's not what you were implying, then my bad. Many people have suggest that it's somehow racist to suggest this.

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1 minute ago, Spy Bee said:

If that's not what you were implying, then my bad. Many people have suggest that it's somehow racist to suggest this.

I was just saying what the MP said. 

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38 minutes ago, The Gaul said:

There was a Leicester MP on the telly this morning indirectly blaming their disproportionate number of densely populated houses. 

Why would Leicester be any worse than anywhere else ?

 

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3 minutes ago, Dougie Do'ins said:

Why would Leicester be any worse than anywhere else ?

 

According to the MP he said his constituency has a really high number of multi generational households in small houses and densely populated areas. I might be wrong, but I'm sure he said something like "it's not uncommon for 10 or more to live in a 3 bedroom house".  I was only half listening by then. 

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Wow, the last shreds of the US's reputation for not being utter cunts has gone- https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/30/us-buys-up-world-stock-of-key-covid-19-drug

 



US buys up world stock of key Covid-19 drug
No other country will be able to buy remdesivir, which can help recovery from Covid-19, for next three months at least


The US has bought up virtually all the stocks for the next three months of one of the two drugs proven to work against Covid-19, leaving none for the UK, Europe or most of the rest of the world.

Experts and campaigners are alarmed both by the US unilateral action on remdesivir and the wider implications, for instance in the event of a vaccine becoming available. The Trump administration has already shown that it is prepared to outbid and outmanoeuvre all other countries to secure the medical supplies it needs for the US.

“They’ve got access to most of the drug supply [of remdesivir], so there’s nothing for Europe,” said Dr Andrew Hill, senior visiting research fellow at Liverpool University.

Remdesivir, the first drug approved by licensing authorities in the US to treat Covid-19, is made by Gilead and has been shown to help people recover faster from the disease. The first 140,000 doses, supplied to drug trials around the world, have been used up. The Trump administration has now bought more than 500,000 doses, which is all of Gilead’s production for July and 90% of August and September.

“President Trump has struck an amazing deal to ensure Americans have access to the first authorised therapeutic for Covid-19,” said the US health and human services secretary, Alex Azar. “To the extent possible, we want to ensure that any American patient who needs remdesivir can get it. The Trump administration is doing everything in our power to learn more about life-saving therapeutics for Covid-19 and secure access to these options for the American people.”


The drug, which was invented for Ebola but failed to work, is under patent to Gilead, which means no other company in wealthy countries can make it. The cost is around $3,200 per treatment of six doses, according to the US government statement.


The deal was announced as it became clear that the pandemic in the US is spiralling out of control. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading public health expert and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told the Senate the US was sliding backwards.

“We are going in the wrong direction,” said Fauci. Last week the US saw a new daily record of 40,000 new coronavirus cases in one day. “I would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around,” he said. He could not provide an estimated death toll, but said: “It is going to be very disturbing, I guarantee you that.”

The US has recorded more than 2.5 million confirmed cases of Covid-19. Some states lifted restrictions only to have to clamp down again. On Monday, the governor of Arizona ordered bars, cinemas, gyms and water parks to shut down for a month, weeks after they reopened. Texas, Florida and California, all seeing rises in cases, have also reimposed restrictions.

Buying up the world’s supply of remdesivir is not just a reaction to the increasing spread and death toll. The US has taken an “America first” attitude throughout the global pandemic.

In May, French manufacturer Sanofi said the US would get first access to its Covid vaccine if it works. Its CEO, Paul Hudson, was quoted as saying: “The US government has the right to the largest pre-order because it’s invested in taking the risk,” and, he added, the US expected that “if we’ve helped you manufacture the doses at risk, we expect to get the doses first”. Later it backtracked under pressure from the French government.

Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau warned there could be unintended negative consequences if the US continued to outbid its allies. “We know it is in both of our interests to work collaboratively and cooperatively to keep our citizens safe,” he said. The Trump administration has also invoked the Defense Production Act to block some medical goods made in the US from being sent abroad.


Nothing looks likely to prevent the US cornering the market in remdesivir, however. “This is the first major approved drug, and where is the mechanism for access?” said Dr Hill. “Once again we’re at the back of the queue.”

The drug has been watched eagerly for the last five months, said Hill, yet there was no mechanism to ensure a supply outside the US. “Imagine this was a vaccine,” he said. “That would be a firestorm. But perhaps this is a taste of things to come.”

Remdesivir would get people out of hospital more quickly, reducing the burden on the NHS, and might improve survival, said Hill, although that has not yet been shown in trials, as it has with the other successful treatment, the steroid dexamethasone. There has been no attempt to buy up the world’s stocks of dexamethasone because there is no need – the drug is 60 years old, cheap and easily available everywhere.

Hill said there was a way for the UK to secure supplies of this and other drugs during the pandemic, through what is known as a compulsory licence, which overrides the intellectual property rights of the company. That would allow the UK government to buy from generic companies in Bangladesh or India, where Gilead’s patent is not recognised.

The UK has always upheld patents, backing the argument of pharma companies that they need their 20-year monopoly to recoup the money they put into research and development. But other countries have shown an interest in compulsory licensing. “It is a question of what countries are prepared to do if this becomes a problem,” said Hill.

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12 minutes ago, Mudface said:

Wow, the last shreds of the US's reputation for not being utter cunts has gone- https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/30/us-buys-up-world-stock-of-key-covid-19-drug

 

 

 

But the government told us we had enough remdesivir for anyone who needed it? Are we suggesting here either the UK, US or both governments are not telling the truth? Shocked I am. Shocked. 

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2 hours ago, Sharp Shooter said:

Bojo knows, the public don't need to know. 

Tk would've known. He'd have definitely known more than boris, although that wouldn't be hard.

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13 hours ago, The Gaul said:

There was a Leicester MP on the telly this morning indirectly blaming their disproportionate number of densely populated houses. 

We had that over here due to the Tönnies outbreak in the Gütersloh area. Seeds being planted in the public mind that those affected are somehow to blame because of the cramped living conditions they live in due to being Eastern European workers. 

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27 minutes ago, Pistonbroke said:

We had that over here due to the Tönnies outbreak in the Gütersloh area. Seeds being planted in the public mind that those affected are somehow to blame because of the cramped living conditions they live in due to being Eastern European workers. 

I don't think there is any inference of blame, but it is a fact that those kind of living conditions will help the virus spread.

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1 minute ago, Spy Bee said:

I don't think there is any inference of blame, but it is a fact that those kind of living conditions will help the virus spread.

 

I was on about what certain people have said over here, and it was definitely an inference of blame. Thankfully most decent people realise that these conditions were purely down to the meat industry and their shit conditions. 

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My girlfriend got her notice yesterday. She used to work in a small cafe, but the social distancing rules will severely limit customer numbers meaning margins are tight. From August 1st, Employers have to pay National Insurance and Pension contributions so they are letting her go at the end of the month.

 

On the upside, I won't have to get up at 6am each day to drop her off at work........

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3 minutes ago, M_B said:

My girlfriend got her notice yesterday. She used to work in a small cafe, but the social distancing rules will severely limit customer numbers meaning margins are tight. From August 1st, Employers have to pay National Insurance and Pension contributions so they are letting her go at the end of the month.

 

On the upside, I won't have to get up at 6am each day to drop her off at work........

Sorry to hear that pal. I think sadly the hospitality and leisure industries are going to be hit hard. By definition they're where people go to unwind and relax and you simply can't do that while the person serving you is dressed in a hazmat suit and shouting at you to get behind the red line. I got moaned at in Costa the other day and nearly went medieval on the motherfucker.

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4 minutes ago, M_B said:

My girlfriend got her notice yesterday. She used to work in a small cafe, but the social distancing rules will severely limit customer numbers meaning margins are tight. From August 1st, Employers have to pay National Insurance and Pension contributions so they are letting her go at the end of the month.

 

On the upside, I won't have to get up at 6am each day to drop her off at work........

Sad news but I think this is going to be a pretty familiar scenario. There's no chance a lot of pubs, cafés and restaurants can survive on hugely reduced numbers. 

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