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Shooter in the Motor

Volts and Amps

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Is there a difference in between for example a 5 volt 0.5 amp compared to a 5 volt 1 amp? Could a device which requires a 5 volt 1 amp power supply work if you used a 5 volt 0.5 amp power supply? Or vice versa?

 

I'd never actually noticed that different plugs have different voltage and ampage and I actually don't really know the difference.

 

Want to educate an electro-idiot?

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47 minutes ago, Shooter in the Motor said:

Could a device which requires a 5 volt 1 amp power supply work if you used a 5 volt 0.5 amp power supply?

No

 

 
Quote

Could a device which requires a 5 volt 0.5 amp power supply work if you used a 5 volt 1 amp power supply?

wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

Yes. A device which requires a 5 volt 0.5 amp power supply will work if you used a 5 volt 1 amp power supply?

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Voltage has to be the same . As for amperage you need the same or more. The device will pull the amps it requires so if amperage is rated lower than original it will not work. So provided connectors the same you looking for same voltage and same amperage or greater than original and it should work.

 

Just seen Jennings has explained it better 

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3 minutes ago, clockspeed said:

Voltage has to be the same . As for amperage you need the same or more. The device will pull the amps it requires so if amperage is rated lower than original it will not work. So provided connectors the same you looking for same voltage and same amperage or greater than original and it should work.

Thanks for your Input

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28 minutes ago, Jennings said:

No

 

 
wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

Yes. A device which requires a 5 volt 0.5 amp power supply will work if you used a 5 volt 1 amp power supply?

This explains why my device doesn't work. I'll be sure to buy a 5 volt 1 amp plug.

 

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8 minutes ago, Shooter in the Motor said:

I most certainly didn't, I also have no idea what it means.

It means don't do whatever you were about to. 

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I have absolutely no clue what an amp or a volt is or what they measure, electricity might as well be a form of witchcraft for all it means to me. We've got solar panels and i have no idea what they do or how or even why, we just get some money every 3 months and that does me.

 

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Simple explanation here- https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/amps-to-watts-calculator/

 

What are Amps, Volts and Watts?

Amps

Amps measure the flow of electricity as an electric current. You should think of electric current as the flow of water through a hosepipe. The more water flowing through the hosepipe, the stronger the current is.

Volts

Volts are the measurement used to determine how much force is needed to cause the electric current to flow. In keeping with the earlier example, you could think of volts as the water pressure in the hosepipe, which makes the water flow.

Watts

Amps multiplied by Volts equals Watts, which is the measurement used to determine the amount of energy. The higher the wattage is, the more power and output from the appliance. In terms of the hosepipe example, this would refer to the amount of water being released.

AC and DC power systems

The labels ‘AC’ and ‘DC’ are used to describe the types of current flow in a circuit. For direct current (DC) the electric current flows only in one direction. However, in alternating current (AC) the electric current changes direction at 50 times per second (50 Hz or hertz) in the UK supply.

An example of direct current would be a battery powered torch. Alternating current (AC) is used to supply things like houses, buildings and mains connected appliances.

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6 minutes ago, Mudface said:

Simple explanation here- https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/amps-to-watts-calculator/

 

What are Amps, Volts and Watts?

Amps

Amps measure the flow of electricity as an electric current. You should think of electric current as the flow of water through a hosepipe. The more water flowing through the hosepipe, the stronger the current is.

Volts

Volts are the measurement used to determine how much force is needed to cause the electric current to flow. In keeping with the earlier example, you could think of volts as the water pressure in the hosepipe, which makes the water flow.

Watts

Amps multiplied by Volts equals Watts, which is the measurement used to determine the amount of energy. The higher the wattage is, the more power and output from the appliance. In terms of the hosepipe example, this would refer to the amount of water being released.

AC and DC power systems

The labels ‘AC’ and ‘DC’ are used to describe the types of current flow in a circuit. For direct current (DC) the electric current flows only in one direction. However, in alternating current (AC) the electric current changes direction at 50 times per second (50 Hz or hertz) in the UK supply.

An example of direct current would be a battery powered torch. Alternating current (AC) is used to supply things like houses, buildings and mains connected appliances.

Where does polarity fit into this?

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13 minutes ago, Mudface said:

Simple explanation here- https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/amps-to-watts-calculator/

 

What are Amps, Volts and Watts?

Amps

Amps measure the flow of electricity as an electric current. You should think of electric current as the flow of water through a hosepipe. The more water flowing through the hosepipe, the stronger the current is.

Volts

Volts are the measurement used to determine how much force is needed to cause the electric current to flow. In keeping with the earlier example, you could think of volts as the water pressure in the hosepipe, which makes the water flow.

Watts

Amps multiplied by Volts equals Watts, which is the measurement used to determine the amount of energy. The higher the wattage is, the more power and output from the appliance. In terms of the hosepipe example, this would refer to the amount of water being released.

AC and DC power systems

The labels ‘AC’ and ‘DC’ are used to describe the types of current flow in a circuit. For direct current (DC) the electric current flows only in one direction. However, in alternating current (AC) the electric current changes direction at 50 times per second (50 Hz or hertz) in the UK supply.

An example of direct current would be a battery powered torch. Alternating current (AC) is used to supply things like houses, buildings and mains connected appliances.

Thanks for that. It was going well, hosepipes etc then it got to AC/DC and my mind drifted and it became a blur.

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7 minutes ago, Shooter in the Motor said:

Where does polarity fit into this?

The polarity on the adapter should match whatever it is you're charging- it'll either be positive or negative (think of popping a battery in the right way round).

 

There are some details here- https://www.groovypost.com/howto/choose-right-power-adapter-charger-phone-laptop/

 

Reading an AC/DC Adapter Label

dc adapter label

If the manufacturer was smart enough (or compelled by law) to include the DC output on the label, you are in luck. Look at the “brick” part of the adapter for the word OUTPUT. Here, you’ll see the volts followed by the direct current symbol and then the current.

The DC symbol looks like this: image

To check the polarity, look for a + or – sign next to the voltage. Or, look for a diagram showing the polarity. It will usually consist of three circles, with a plus or minus on either side and a solid circle or C in the middle. If the + sign is on the right, then the adapter has positive polarity:

dc center positive polarity

If there is a – sign on the right, then it has negative polarity:

dc center negative polarity

Next, you want to look at your device for the DC input. You’ll usually see at least the voltage near the DC plug receptacle. But you also want to make sure the current matches, too.

You might find both the voltage and the current elsewhere on the device, on the bottom or inside a battery compartment cover or in the manual. Again, look for the polarity, by either noting a + or – symbol or the polarity diagram.

Remember: the input of the device should be the same as the output of the adapter. This includes polarity. If the device has a DC input of +12V / 5.4A, get an adapter that has a DC output of +12V / 5.4A. If you have a universal adapter, make sure it has the proper current rating and that you choose the correct voltage and polarity.

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3 minutes ago, A Red said:

Thanks for that. It was going well, hosepipes etc then it got to AC/DC and my mind drifted and it became a blur.

Yeah, I always hated learning about electricity in Physics at school, it's a really difficult concept to get your head around.

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