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Bjornebye

Everton (H) Premier League - 4/12/19 - 20:15

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7 minutes ago, Pidge said:

Not that bad a line-up, would've had Keita or AoC over Lallana and feels a bit of a risk throwing Shaq straight in after a long layoff, but otherwise it's fine.

I can’t decide if this post is full of optimism or opium 

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Just now, Bjornebye said:

I can’t decide if this post is full of optimism or opium 

Best defence available, Gini's first choice midfielder for the more advanced roles, Mane's our most in-form attacker.  Origi loves playig them (when he doesn't get assaulted). Even with Shaq and Lallana, two players actually capable of beating a man which we'll need to create openings.

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15 minutes ago, magicrat said:

Geography can be tricky 

I think it confused me because I'd heard he was an Everton fan growing up and everyone knows only real locals are Everton fans.

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4 minutes ago, Pidge said:

Best defence available, Gini's first choice midfielder for the more advanced roles, Mane's our most in-form attacker.  Origi loves playig them (when he doesn't get assaulted). Even with Shaq and Lallana, two players actually capable of beating a man which we'll need to create openings.

Text me your dealers number please.

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One missing link last year: Shaqiri. Put the ball near Origi and the goal and it’s going in. Too much talk of them somewhere else. 

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Just now, Captain said:

I was nervous before, mostly for statistical reasons, but now my arse has gone!

Yours and mine.

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So long as we don't go behind we have seen them hanging on late and concededing goals. Our extra PED influenced fitness and bench options can win it late

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3 minutes ago, Jairzinho said:

Anyone got the real starting line up?

The One Show

Coronations Street

Eastenders

999 Whats your Emergency

ITN

The Graham Norton Show 

The Weather in Norwegian

Topless Darts

Babestation

BBC News Breakfast 

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Just now, Bjornebye said:

The One Show

Coronations Street

Eastenders

999 Whats your Emergency

ITN

The Graham Norton Show 

Cheers, mate.

 

Is Salah on the Graham Norton show?

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2 minutes ago, Jairzinho said:

Cheers, mate.

 

Is Salah on the Graham Norton show?

Judi Dench, Trevor McDonald and Lou Diamond Phillips. Music from Elbow. 

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