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General Election 2019

Who are you voting for?   

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  1. 1. Who are you voting for?



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I haven't even got a clue who my local Labour candidate will be. Or what selection process will now follow. Talk of an NEC led selection and election process now being adopted given the tight time frame.

 

Anybody has to be better than the last deceitful, racist, right wing, uber-nationalist, war crime appeasing candidate. 

 

I'm made up that I can once again vote for my party and without the previous sense of "holding one's nose" that came with voting for Ellman. 

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Always lived in relatively strong Labour seats but had felt I would support the Lib Dems if my vote would be wasted on Labour , but since the coalition & Swinson's election I wouldn't see much point as they are only a fag packet width from the Tories.

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3 minutes ago, Lee909 said:

 

She's a tory that doesn't want Brexit so wears a yellow ribbon 

Whilst I agree with your assessment of Swinson, and the Lib Dems in general, they are the only party in my constituency with even a tiny chance of getting rid of Mel Snide.

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1 minute ago, Jairzinho said:

Whilst I agree with your assessment of Swinson, and the Lib Dems in general, they are the only party in my constituency with even a tiny chance of getting rid of Mel Snide.

Yeah I get that in some areas.

 

 

Cant see anything but a tory-lib dem shitfest. 

 

Even if 16/17 year old can vote the local governments will take a age to process their voting forms, especially in non tory strongholds

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7 minutes ago, Nelly-Torres said:

I'm made up that I can once again vote for my party and without the previous sense of "holding one's nose" that came with voting for Ellman. 

That's blatant anti-semitism, I'm reporting you to the Daily Mail, Margaret Hodge, Tracy Ann Oberman, Rachel Riley, and more importantly Stronts!

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14 minutes ago, Lee909 said:

Big risk in voting for the lib dems tactically when it's led by a woman that will happily prop up the tories and do their dirty work like the last time she was in a coalition. 

 

I for one can't wait to enjoy another six weeks of this bollocks.

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4 minutes ago, Strontium Dog™ said:

 

I for one can't wait to enjoy another six weeks of this bollocks.


She’s a proven worse voting record than even Michael fucking Gove during the coalition. 
 

That’s a fact mate, not bollocks. 

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8 minutes ago, Nelly-Torres said:

I haven't even got a clue who my local Labour candidate will be. Or what selection process will now follow. Talk of an NEC led selection and election process now being adopted given the tight time frame.

 

Anybody has to be better than the last deceitful, racist, right wing, uber-nationalist, war crime appeasing candidate. 

 

I'm made up that I can once again vote for my party and without the previous sense of "holding one's nose" that came with voting for Ellman. 

 

We voted on ours last week. Huge turnout of 23, including my lad who’s only 15. 19 of us voted for a woman on the left who’s very active in the CLP. Shame she’s got no chance of winning like because I’d have a direct link to her if I had something to say. She’s a good candidate though. Not sure about the timing now because it hasn’t been confirmed by the NEC yet. Maybe they’ll overturn our 19 votes and parachute someone in. 

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9 minutes ago, Captain Turdseye said:

 

We voted on ours last week. Huge turnout of 23, including my lad who’s only 15. 19 of us voted for a woman on the left who’s very active in the CLP. Shame she’s got no chance of winning like because I’d have a direct link to her if I had something to say. She’s a good candidate though. Not sure about the timing now because it hasn’t been confirmed by the NEC yet. Maybe they’ll overturn our 19 votes and parachute someone in. 

Cronyism ?  Typical. 

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13 minutes ago, Strontium Dog™ said:

 

I for one can't wait to enjoy another six weeks of this bollocks.

Looks back to check if the Lib Dems propped up a tory government for years, helped rise tuition fees, Austerity, looks to see if Jo Swinson was a member of Cameron cabinet or if its all part of some bad dream. 

 

 

 

 

No I can confirm this did happen. 

But I'm sure it wasn't her fault and she was forced to vote the way she did. 

 

 

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55 minutes ago, SasaS said:

I know but he is supposed to be some kind of Republican.

I didn't see any point in adding them. I nearly only put 5 parties down

 

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I think arguably the biggest factor in this election will be what the Brexit Party decide to do.

 

So far they've stood strong on a no deal brexit, and being prepared to go head to head with the torys. If this changes though and they form a pact with them, this could well be the difference. If the Brexit Party only stand in Labour Leave areas then this could have dire consequences for Labour.

 

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39 minutes ago, Strontium Dog™ said:

 

I for one can't wait to enjoy another six weeks of this bollocks.

 

34 minutes ago, lifetime fan said:


She’s a proven worse voting record than even Michael fucking Gove during the coalition. 
 

That’s a fact mate, not bollocks. 

 

16 minutes ago, Lee909 said:

Looks back to check if the Lib Dems propped up a tory government for years, helped rise tuition fees, Austerity, looks to see if Jo Swinson was a member of Cameron cabinet or if its all part of some bad dream. 

 

 

 

 

No I can confirm this did happen. 

But I'm sure it wasn't her fault and she was forced to vote the way she did. 

 

 

Facts don't count when it doesn't suit the agenda remember. 

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I just don't get why opposition party's are handing Boris a chance at a majority. Should of let the fucker stew impotent until even his brexit meffs got fed up with his failures his bluster and bullshit. This feels like a gift. Here you go Boris shape Britain's future in your image, your fucking fat! burst sheep, bullingdon boy dripping with privilege and elitist bullshit image. He's a joke of a character and we out trumped America. 

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Personally I think this fella has had an astute handle on where Brexit is at for some time now. I don’t think it can be stressed enough how crucial people working together likely is in hoping to stop this government getting back in. Across the house, across parties, across the country, this is not the time for endless division and one-upmanship, these are truly dark days.
 

It’s not going to be enough to continue the endless Liverpool/United fans level tribal pissing contests between Labour and the Lib Dems, over Corbyn and anti-semitism, etc etc, then each side just blame the other if Johnson wins a full term. A Cameron or May government would be better for the country, let alone a Corbyn or Swinson one. There’s a common enemy here, if the tiniest bit of mutual goodwill could be shown.

 

Election 2019: Remainers have one last chance 

 
Ian DuntBy Ian DuntFollow iandunt

It's on. Britain is going to the polls again. And there's a chance - just a chance - that this Brexit mess will be sorted one way or the other.

It was clear which way the wind was blowing once the government had come to terms with the SNP and Lib Dem bill from earlier in the week. It didn't really have any other options. It lost its Fixed-Terms Parliament Act attempt yesterday. That required a two-thirds majority, but allowed it to set the date - something which made opposition parties nervous. So Johnson dropped it and produced a short bill this morning with a December 12th date on it. It would have a slim majority with SNP and Lib Dem support. And once that happened, Labour had to come on board.

For a couple of moments, it still looked like it could run into trouble. The government put forward a programme motion - a plan for passing the bill quickly through the Commons - which allowed it to place amendments but not opposition parties. Standard-issue dirty tricks from an administration defined by them. Labour sounded like it might refuse to support that.

But then Labour MP Stella Creasy put down an amendment unlocking further amendments from opposition parties. It got through and the rest of the party then fell in behind it.

 

Even then there were potential problems. An amendment was put down to give votes to those aged 16-17 and another for EU citizens. If they had passed, the government would have pulled the bill. But the deputy Speaker did not select them, as they were considered outside the scope of the legisaltion - insufficiently connected to its purpose.

The final battle came down to a single amendment, which would have moved the date to December 9th. This got close. Just hours before it was voted on, ten Tory MPs who had lost the whip over the no-deal votes last month had it returned to them. It was a crucial move. In the end, the amendment was defeated with the votes of exactly ten MPs.

That was it. It was done. The election would be held on December 12th.

The next few weeks will be a brutal, no-holds-barred battle for the future of this country. It'll be ugly and it'll be harsh. But it is also necessary.

The reality is that Johnson's Brexit deal was on the verge of passing the House of Commons. It almost passed ten days ago, when MPs instead broke cover for Oliver Letwin's amendment. It nearly passed two days later, when it was narrowly saved by the rejection of the programme motion.

People seem to have forgotten how close these votes were. There were no safety nets left. If they'd gone through, Brexit would be happening right now. Remainers were at the point of absolute defeat. They were wobbling on the cliff edge. And then the government made a high-risk strategic decision. It gave up on the deal and decided to go for an election.

It is a quite mad thing to have done. They could have got that deal through if they'd had a bit of patience and then they could have held an election afterwards. But they made a different choice. And Remainers should breathe a sigh of relief that they did. They have nothing to lose from it and much to gain.

No matter what people say, the Commons was not on the verge of supporting a second referendum. It wasn't going to do it on Johnson's deal. If it did it at all, which was questionable, it would have done so if the deal was defeated. But the deal did not look like it would be defeated. It looked like it was going to pass.

And even if a vote had eventually gone through supporting another referendum, it wouldn't have been enough. It would have required a government to pass legislation to hold it. This government wouldn't have done it. So there would have had to be a vote of no confidence, then the opposition parties would have had to select a prime minister - something they hade so far utterly failed to do. Then they'd have had to get the full legislation enacting the referendum through via an unelected majority government. And then somehow win it. 

It simply wasn't going to happen. It's silly to pretend it would.

But then Johnson decided to go for an election.

He can be made to suffer extensively for that decision. Yes, he has a lead in the polls. Yes, Jeremy Corbyn is unpopular. Yes, Remain is more divided that Leave. But for all that, it is a fairly even contest.

There is a geographical split in the Remain vote which is to its advantage. Opposition parties have multiple coalition opportunities open to them while Johnson has none. It can be won. A minority Labour government relying on Lib Dem and SNP support is a perfectly likely outcome. And that outcome leads to a second referendum.

There are no guarantees. This will be the most uphill, fraught, emotional, gruelling political battle many Remainers will have ever faced. But now they have a chance. And they have been saved from the relentless, and increasingly inevitable, crunching momentum towards the deal passing.

It's a good day. Full of risk, but also full of potential. And more importantly: there were no other avenues open. This was the only one.

The fight is now on. For many of the people involved, it'll be the most important one of their lives.

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25 minutes ago, MegadriveMan said:

I think arguably the biggest factor in this election will be what the Brexit Party decide to do.

 

So far they've stood strong on a no deal brexit, and being prepared to go head to head with the torys. If this changes though and they form a pact with them, this could well be the difference. If the Brexit Party only stand in Labour Leave areas then this could have dire consequences for Labour.

 

I'm not convinced that the public are as obsessed about Brexit as the media are. I genuinely don’t see them taking many - if any - seats from Labour. 

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41 minutes ago, AngryofTuebrook said:

I'm not convinced that the public are as obsessed about Brexit as the media are. I genuinely don’t see them taking many - if any - seats from Labour. 

I hope your right mate. 

 

Hopefully they split the leave vote enough to get Labour in. 

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