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Should the UK remain a member of the EU

  

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  1. 1. Should the UK remain a member of the EU

    • Yes
      252
    • No
      58


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37 minutes ago, Section_31 said:

Nailed on there'll be a big drive to rejoin soon enough, that's how the British roll. 

 

It was all about the big bets they put on the UK leaving. Now that they've achieved that and as soon as their bets are paid out, they'll be clambering to rejoin like a dog in heat. 

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And so it begins, welcome to Brexitania...

 

The ink isn’t even dry and they looking to destroy hard fought workers rights.

 

Fuck you and your race to the bottom economy, cunts.

 

‘Worker protections enshrined in EU law — including the 48-hour week — would be ripped up under plans being drawn up by the government as part of a post-Brexit overhaul of UK labour markets. 


The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department (Beis) with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out on the plan.

The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders.

 

The move would potentially mark a cleardivergence from EU labour market standards but the UK would only face retaliation from Brussels under the terms of its new post-Brexit trade treaty if the EU could demonstrate the changes had a material impact on competition. The main areas of focus are on ending the 48-hour working week, tweaking the rules around rest breaks at work and not including overtime pay when calculating some holiday pay entitlements, according to people familiar with the plans. The government also wants to remove the requirement of businesses to log the detailed, daily reporting of working hours, saving an estimated £1bn. 


The government insisted that any reforms would be designed to help both companies and their employees — and put to a full consultation — saying it had no intention of “lowering” workers’ rights.  “The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world,” a government spokesperson said. “Leaving the EU allows us to continue to be a standard setter and protect and enhance UK workers’ rights.”

 

But Ed Miliband, Labour’s business secretary, said the proposals were a “disgrace” at a time when so many people were worried about their jobs.  “In the midst of the worst economic crisis in three centuries, ministers are preparing to tear up their promises to the British people and taking a sledgehammer to workers’ rights,” he said.  “Workers in the UK are the primary beneficiaries of the very positive judgments of the European courts,” said an official at the Trades Union Congress, adding that any attempt to “whittle down and narrow” the interpretation of European law “is a concern because it amounts to a diminution of rights”.  EU officials have said that decisions on whether to trigger tariffs and other “rebalancing measures” against the UK under the recently-signed post-Brexit trade deal would depend on the practical effects of policy decisions.

 

Brussels has often highlighted labour market standards as a core issue for the “level playing field” that the deal is meant to uphold, but regulation of working time at EU level is patchy, with Brussels seeking repeatedly to shore up how the directive is applied. Britain, along with many EU countries, opted out from enforcing the 48-hour limit on the working week as a member state. 


The government points out that the UK often “gold plates” EU minimum standards — such as offering 5.6 weeks of annual leave compared with the EU requirement of 4 weeks.  But in a call with 250 leading business figures earlier this month, prime minister Boris Johnson urged industry to get behind plans for future regulatory liberalisation after Brexit — to the delight of many free marketeers in his cabinet.


Matt Kilcoyne, deputy head of the free market Adam Smith Institute, welcomed the proposals — saying the current “one size fits all” 48-hour rule was a “straitjacket on the economy”. Yet there will be nerves at the top of government about how a shake-up of employment rights will be received among low-paid working class voterswho backed the Tories in northern “Red Wall” seats in the December 2019 general election. 

 

A change in the calculation of holiday pay could be “a significant monetary loss” for a low paid worker often forced into overtime to make ends meet, the TUC official said.  It is also not clear that business, which is already adjusting to Brexit and battling the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic, is currently clamouring for a fundamental overhaul of workers’ rights.’

 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.ft.com/content/55588f86-a4f8-4cf3-aecb-38723b787569

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10 minutes ago, Rick Sanchez C-137 said:

People voted for these cunts. How can they be so fucking dense?!

The only solace I take in it all is that they'll mostly be just as fucked as those that didn't. 

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1 hour ago, Section_31 said:

The only solace I take in it all is that they'll mostly be just as fucked as those that didn't. 

Yep and think how many arguments will happen when they try and lay the blame at Labour/Liberal/Human Being feet 

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32 minutes ago, Bjornebye said:

Yep and think how many arguments will happen when they try and lay the blame at Labour/Liberal/Human Being feet 

They already have. Apparently all the shit the Tories have been getting up to is Corbyn's fault for not being electable.

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4 minutes ago, Rushies tash said:

They already have. Apparently all the shit the Tories have been getting up to is Corbyn's fault for not being electable.

 

That argument makes me want to duct tape a fork to a drill and jam it in my own ear full tilt.

 

"Well the Torys track record is as clear as day but Jezzas a bit scruffy so we've decided to shoot ourselves in the foot again this election. Thankfully the NHS is still free for at least the next 6 months so they can stitch us up."

 

Stupid, stupid, stupid cunts.

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2 hours ago, Bruce Spanner said:

And so it begins, welcome to Brexitania...

 

The ink isn’t even dry and they looking to destroy hard fought workers rights.

 

Fuck you and your race to the bottom economy, cunts.

 

‘Worker protections enshrined in EU law — including the 48-hour week — would be ripped up under plans being drawn up by the government as part of a post-Brexit overhaul of UK labour markets. 


The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department (Beis) with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out on the plan.

The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders.

 

The move would potentially mark a cleardivergence from EU labour market standards but the UK would only face retaliation from Brussels under the terms of its new post-Brexit trade treaty if the EU could demonstrate the changes had a material impact on competition. The main areas of focus are on ending the 48-hour working week, tweaking the rules around rest breaks at work and not including overtime pay when calculating some holiday pay entitlements, according to people familiar with the plans. The government also wants to remove the requirement of businesses to log the detailed, daily reporting of working hours, saving an estimated £1bn. 


The government insisted that any reforms would be designed to help both companies and their employees — and put to a full consultation — saying it had no intention of “lowering” workers’ rights.  “The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world,” a government spokesperson said. “Leaving the EU allows us to continue to be a standard setter and protect and enhance UK workers’ rights.”

 

But Ed Miliband, Labour’s business secretary, said the proposals were a “disgrace” at a time when so many people were worried about their jobs.  “In the midst of the worst economic crisis in three centuries, ministers are preparing to tear up their promises to the British people and taking a sledgehammer to workers’ rights,” he said.  “Workers in the UK are the primary beneficiaries of the very positive judgments of the European courts,” said an official at the Trades Union Congress, adding that any attempt to “whittle down and narrow” the interpretation of European law “is a concern because it amounts to a diminution of rights”.  EU officials have said that decisions on whether to trigger tariffs and other “rebalancing measures” against the UK under the recently-signed post-Brexit trade deal would depend on the practical effects of policy decisions.

 

Brussels has often highlighted labour market standards as a core issue for the “level playing field” that the deal is meant to uphold, but regulation of working time at EU level is patchy, with Brussels seeking repeatedly to shore up how the directive is applied. Britain, along with many EU countries, opted out from enforcing the 48-hour limit on the working week as a member state. 


The government points out that the UK often “gold plates” EU minimum standards — such as offering 5.6 weeks of annual leave compared with the EU requirement of 4 weeks.  But in a call with 250 leading business figures earlier this month, prime minister Boris Johnson urged industry to get behind plans for future regulatory liberalisation after Brexit — to the delight of many free marketeers in his cabinet.


Matt Kilcoyne, deputy head of the free market Adam Smith Institute, welcomed the proposals — saying the current “one size fits all” 48-hour rule was a “straitjacket on the economy”. Yet there will be nerves at the top of government about how a shake-up of employment rights will be received among low-paid working class voterswho backed the Tories in northern “Red Wall” seats in the December 2019 general election. 

 

A change in the calculation of holiday pay could be “a significant monetary loss” for a low paid worker often forced into overtime to make ends meet, the TUC official said.  It is also not clear that business, which is already adjusting to Brexit and battling the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic, is currently clamouring for a fundamental overhaul of workers’ rights.’

 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.ft.com/content/55588f86-a4f8-4cf3-aecb-38723b787569

This is the point where Gnash reminds us that workers' rights weren't handed to us by the EU, but were won by the working class through centuries of struggle: therefore, we shouldn't worry about losing loads of rights, because we can just start a long struggle to regain them. Or something. 

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5 minutes ago, Rick Sanchez C-137 said:

 

That argument makes me want to duct tape a fork to a drill and jam it in my own ear full tilt.

 

"Well the Torys track record is as clear as day but Jezzas a bit scruffy so we've decided to shoot ourselves in the foot again this election. Thankfully the NHS is still free for at least the next 6 months so they can stitch us up."

 

Stupid, stupid, stupid cunts.

Well given my belief that you can't control the actions of others, just your response to it, I refuse to give two fucks about politics in this country. I'll always vote in opposition to the Tories, but I've learned that there is a plentiful supply of fuckwits who'll vote against their own interests because they saw a funny meme of Diane Abbott.

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1 hour ago, AngryofTuebrook said:

This is the point where Gnash reminds us that workers' rights weren't handed to us by the EU, but were won by the working class through centuries of struggle: therefore, we shouldn't worry about losing loads of rights, because we can just start a long struggle to regain them. Or something. 

But nearly all our rights were indeed won before we entered the eu Angry, not an opinion that's a fact. 

 

Working conditions in today's Britain are fucking awful now even in the eu, look at the conditions in the sweatshops in the Midlands, youngsters on zero hour contracts or overseas slaves picking vegetables. 

 

If a tory government wants to take away workers rights they should be made to understand by unions, workers, the labour party and the general public that their proposals will be opposed and they can use the excuse of blaming the European union. They are out in the open.

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4 minutes ago, Gnasher said:

But nearly all our rights were indeed won before we entered the eu Angry, not an opinion that's a fact. 

 

Working conditions in today's Britain are fucking awful now even in the eu, look at the conditions in the sweatshops in the Midlands, youngsters on zero hour contracts or overseas slaves picking vegetables. 

 

If a tory government wants to take away workers rights they should be made to understand by unions, workers, the labour party and the general public that their proposals will be opposed and they can use the excuse of blaming the European union. They are out in the open.

Handily for the government, there will be alot of people out of work, signing up to do their old job with a new contract. 

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